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  • receptor-mediated en
  • When a transferrin protein loaded with iron encounters a transferrin receptor on the surface of a cell , e.g., erythroid precursors in the bone marrow, it binds to it and is transported into the cell in a vesicle by receptor-mediated endocytosis . (wikipedia.org)
  • It imports iron by internalizing the transferrin-iron complex through receptor-mediated endocytosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • scanning electron m
  • Its cytoskeleton, the morphology of its hydrogenosomes, and endocytosis phenomena have been observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). (scielo.cl)
  • cells
  • Endocytosis is a key feature of virtually all eukaryotic cells. (indigo.ca)
  • There is evidence that endocytosis must have been present in cells as far back as the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) ( 3 , 4 ), but it has never been reported to occur in members of the domains Bacteria and Archaea. (pnas.org)
  • To investigate the possibility of an endocytosis-like mechanism in the planctomycete bacterium G. obscuriglobus , we incubated cells with GFP and examined them via confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). (pnas.org)
  • Most animal cells engage portions of their surface plasma membranes in a process called endocytosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Endocytosis by coated pits occurs, as in stationary cells, at random. (wikipedia.org)
  • dissociation
  • Because the activation of Rac strengthens cell-cell interactions, the authors plan to determine whether down-regulation of Rac at adhesion sites-and thus reactivation of endocytosis-is essential for HGF-induced cell dissociation. (rupress.org)
  • system
  • Occurrence of such ability in a bacterium is consistent with autogenous evolution of endocytosis and the endomembrane system in an ancestral noneukaryote cell. (pnas.org)
  • major
  • A major unsolved problem in biology is how the many unique characteristics of the eukaryote cell evolved, including endomembranes and their dynamic features, such as endocytosis ( 1 ). (pnas.org)