• BIOETHICS
  • The views, opinions and positions expressed by these authors and blogs are theirs and do not necessarily represent that of the Bioethics Research Library and Kennedy Institute of Ethics or Georgetown University. (georgetown.edu)
  • In it's first major bioethics document in 20 years, the Vatican renewed and clarified it's position on stem cell research, gene therapy and other issues. (nbcnews.com)
  • But in a major new document on bioethics, it showed flexibility on some forms of gene therapy and left open questions surrounding embryo adoption. (nbcnews.com)
  • Dr. Edmund Pellegrino, emeritus professor of medicine and medical ethics at Georgetown University and the chairman of the President's Council on Bioethics, said that vagueness indicated that the question of embryo adoption "is still a little bit open. (nbcnews.com)
  • Helga Kuhse is Adjunct Research Fellow, Centre for Human Bioethics at Monash University. (wiley.com)
  • Udo Sch√ľklenk holds the Ontario Research Chair in Bioethics and Public Policy at Queen's University at Kingston in Canada. (wiley.com)
  • Macklin is a fellow of the Hastings Center, an independent bioethics research institution. (wikipedia.org)
  • The focus of her research is on issues of women's health and assisted reproductive technologies, but her research and publication record also extend to such topics as research involving humans (including human embryo research), gene editing, novel genetic technologies, public health, the role of bioethics consultants, and neuroethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1996 Baylis was hired on at Dalhousie University as an Associate Professor in the Office of Bioethics Education and Research (later the Department of Bioethics), and in 2004 became Professor and Canada Research Chair in Bioethics and Philosophy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Baylis is the founder and leader (since 2003) of Novel Tech Ethics, now renamed NTE Impact Ethics, an interdisciplinary research team based at Dalhousie University (with some international collaborators) that does research at the intersection of health, bioethics, and public policy. (wikipedia.org)
  • and Canada Research Chair (Tier 1) in Bioethics and Philosophy (2004-2018). (wikipedia.org)
  • He has published eight books and authored or co-authored over 100 journal articles and chapters on critical issues in bioethics including: genetics, stem cells, ethics of assisted reproductive technologies, neuroethics, HIV prevention, recreational drug use, research ethics, and doctor-patient relationships. (wikipedia.org)
  • somatic cell nuc
  • The language of the initiative disguises the impact of the proposal by using scientific terminology such as 'somatic cell nuclear transfer' (SCNT), without explanation to the voter who may not realize that this means human cloning. (freerepublic.com)
  • Stem cell treatments are a type of cell therapy that introduce new cells into adult bodies for possible treatment of cancer, somatic cell nuclear transfer, diabetes, and other medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • oocyte
  • A US study concluded that donating an embryo is approximately twice as cost-effective as oocyte donation in terms of cost per live birth, with a cost of $22,000 per live delivery compared to $41,000 for oocyte donation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Refinements in technology have increased pregnancy rates and it is estimated that in 2010 about 4 million children have been born by IVF, with approximately 170,000 coming from donated oocyte and embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • fertilisation
  • The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA), the governmental body that regulates fertility treatments in the U.K., looks set to approve the use of hybrid embryos for stem cell research at a meeting later on today. (scienceblogs.com)
  • Edwards developed human culture media to allow the fertilisation and early embryo culture, while Steptoe used laparoscopy to recover ovocytes from patients with tubal infertility. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2001, the British Parliament amended the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 (since amended by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 2008) to permit the destruction of embryos for hESC harvests but only if the research satisfies one of the following requirements: Increases knowledge about the development of embryos, Increases knowledge about serious disease, or Enables any such knowledge to be applied in developing treatments for serious disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • abortion
  • In the abortion debate, your judgment about that embryo stacks up against claims of a woman's right to choose. (washingtonian.com)
  • In the use of drugs such as RU-486, which causes the elimination of the embryo once it is implanted, the "sin of abortion" is committed, the document said, thus their use is "gravely immoral. (nbcnews.com)
  • Abortion rights advocates, advocates of embryonic stem cell research, and members of the fertility industry object to referring to the transfer as an "adoption" because they feel it gives an embryo the same status as a child. (wikipedia.org)
  • hESCs
  • In addition, hESCs may be generated from embryos with arrested 9 or otherwise abnormal growth that would render them unsuitable for implantation. (aappublications.org)
  • donors
  • The purpose of this article is to comment upon an interesting gap in the criticism heaped upon Woo Suk Hwang following the revelation that his apparently groundbreaking stem cell research involved both the falsification of data and the unethical recruitment of egg donors. (lse.ac.uk)
  • If the donors are not available to be screened, the embryos must be given a label that indicates that the required screening has not been done, and the recipients must agree to accept the associated risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • theoretically
  • For Parkinson's disease or spinal-cord injury, we could theoretically put in cells to replace those that are dead or damaged, but by the time someone is afflicted with Alzheimer's, new cells won't help. (washingtonian.com)
  • woman's
  • Where it is given for the purpose of implantation, the donation is followed by the placement of those embryos into the recipient woman's uterus to facilitate pregnancy and childbirth in the recipient. (wikipedia.org)
  • couples
  • Lawyers who assist couples who are trying to acquire an embryo state the term "embryo adoption" is a misnomer because the transfer of an embryo is handled as property transfer. (wikipedia.org)
  • neuroethics
  • Third Sector Publishing, 2004-present Who's Who in Black Canada, 2002-present Baylis has been the principal investigator on eleven Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) grants (totaling more than $2.4 million), including a New Emerging Team grant, States of Mind: Emerging Issues in Neuroethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • spare
  • The title of her PhD thesis is "The ethics of ex utero research on spare IVF human embryos" and was completed under the supervision of Benjamin Freedman. (wikipedia.org)
  • He reports that "Twenty-five per cent of patients want to donate their [spare] embryos - not as many as I'd like. (wikipedia.org)
  • electroporation
  • A number of alternative techniques are available, such as chemical sensitivation of cells, electroporation, optical injection and biolistics. (wikipedia.org)
  • translational
  • Under the common principles of research integrity, protection of patient's welfare, respect for the research subjects, transparency and social justice, the centrality of good clinical practice, and informed consent in research and translational medicine is supported. (hindawi.com)
  • Responding to advances in research and translational medicine, in May 2016, the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) published an update of the existing guidelines [ 1 , 2 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • therapies
  • 4 Although the fundamental principle of stem cell research remains the same (ie, the development of undifferentiated cells into committed cell lineages for the purpose of tissue renewal and repair), the science has evolved to encompass many new applications, including cell-based therapies 5 and drug screening. (aappublications.org)
  • Several studies on stem cells produced increasingly important findings, with considerable implications on the quality of human life, as in the case of the therapies for intractable diseases, the assessment of efficacy and toxicity of new drugs and transplants. (hindawi.com)
  • lines
  • Moreover, although a single cell biopsy may be performed in IVF cases to test for genetic diseases, it is unclear whether it would be appropriate to transfer to a uterus an embryo that underwent such biopsy for the creation of stem cell lines. (aappublications.org)
  • The Vatican did show flexibility in saying that parents could in good conscience use vaccines for their children that were prepared using cell lines derived from an "illicit origin. (nbcnews.com)
  • The case began almost two years ago when, in response to President Obama's March 9, 2009 Executive Order, the NIH published and noticed for public comment regulatory guidelines allowing federal funds to be used for the first time for the creation of new stem cell lines (hESC) requiring the destruction of living human embryos. (christiansunite.com)
  • Much of the criticism has been a result of religious beliefs, and in the most high-profile case, US President George W Bush signed an executive order banning the use of federal funding for any cell lines other than those already in existence, stating at the time, "My position on these issues is shaped by deeply held beliefs," and "I also believe human life is a sacred gift from our creator. (wikipedia.org)
  • Germany has restrictive policies for stem cell research, but a 2008 law authorizes "the use of imported stem cell lines produced before May 1, 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reproduction
  • She has more than 130 scholarly publications and books on AIDS, human reproduction, the ethics of human subjects in research, health policy, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embryo donation is a form of third party reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Others use the terms synonymously because regardless of whether the arrangement is open or anonymous, the donation of embryos and a clinical assisted reproduction procedure is involved, and the recipient couple is preparing to raise a child not genetically related to them. (wikipedia.org)
  • donation
  • Embryo donation can be handled on an anonymous basis (donor and recipient parties are not known to each other), or on an open basis (parties' identities are shared and the families agree to a relationship). (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus what was called gamete and embryo donation, came into being. (wikipedia.org)
  • A careful reading of the 1983 clinical report often cited as the first instance of embryo donation reveals that the donated embryo was actually created for the recipient at the same time that four embryos were made for the donor couple's own use. (wikipedia.org)
  • proposals
  • Charlie Cain, The Detroit News, "Medical marijuana passes, stem cell proposal leads" November 4, 2008 Statewide Ballot Proposals 2008 Archived 2008-10-28 at the Wayback Machine. (wikipedia.org)
  • California
  • This November voters will find the ' California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative ' on the ballot. (freerepublic.com)
  • Some of the members of this committee would be appointed by chancellors of the University of California, whose institutions would obviously have a clear financial interest in garnering such research projects. (freerepublic.com)
  • After a year as a postdoctoral research fellow at the California Institute of Technology he joined the scientific staff of the National Institute for Medical Research at Mill Hill. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethical
  • From its inception, however, it has raised ethical concerns based not on the use of stem cells themselves but on objections to the source of the cells-specifically, the destruction of preimplantation human embryos. (aappublications.org)
  • In the thesis she introduced (at the time) a "novel ethical distinction between viable and non-viable human embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • He has been widely cited as an authority on ethical issues concerning genetic testing for Huntington's disease, breast cancer, genetic discrimination, medical privacy, epidemics of HIV and prion diseases such as Kuru, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or "Mad Cow" disease), death and dying, stem cell research, and spirituality and medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • destroy
  • That, in turn, depends on whether you think that an embryo is a human being-at a very early stage of development, but nonetheless to be respected-or just a bag of cells, okay to destroy for some good that might come of it. (washingtonian.com)
  • Is it just to destroy an embryo cell if it has the potential to cure countless numbers of patients? (wikipedia.org)