• physics
  • In physics , elasticity (from Greek ἐλαστός "ductible") is the ability of a body to resist a distorting influence or deforming force and to return to its original size and shape when that influence or force is removed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Equation
  • If v = V max S K m + S {\displaystyle v={\frac {V_{\max }S}{K_{m}+S}}} then it can be easily shown than ε S v = K m K m + S {\displaystyle \varepsilon _{S}^{v}={\frac {K_{m}}{K_{m}+S}}} This equation illustrates the idea that elasticities need not be constants (as with mass-action laws) but can be a function of the reactant concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • partial
  • The partial derivative in the definition indicates that the elasticity is measured with respect to changes in a factor S while keeping all other factors constant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Given the definition of the elasticity in terms of a partial derivative it is possible for example to determine the elasticity of an arbitrary rate law by differentiating the rate law by the independent variable and scaling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the elasticity can be defined logarithmically, that is: ε S v = ∂ ln ⁡ v ∂ ln ⁡ S {\displaystyle \varepsilon _{S}^{v}={\frac {\partial \ln v}{\partial \ln S}}} differentiating in log space is an obvious approach. (wikipedia.org)
  • modulus
  • The modulus of elasticity of a given material is the force required to elongate a piece of the material (whose area of cross-section is equal to one square inch) through space a distance equal to its primary length. (chestofbooks.com)
  • plasticity
  • there are entire courses devoted to the theory of elasticity, viscoelasticity and plasticity, which you are no doubt looking forward to taking. (brown.edu)
  • But their most characteristic, though not perhaps their most general, property is that they combine in themselves the apparently incompatible properties of elasticity and rigidity on the one hand and plasticity on the other. (yourdictionary.com)
  • biochemical
  • The fact that different groups independently introduced the same concept implies that elasticities, or their equivalent, kinetic orders, are most likely a fundamental concept in the analysis of complex biochemical or chemical systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • theory
  • Elasticity theory" redirects here. (wikipedia.org)
  • Linear elasticity theory is thus the best known and most widely used branch of solid mechanics. (brown.edu)
  • The first third of the book contains the fundamentals of the theory of elasticity. (springer.com)
  • Fung, Y.C. Theory of elasticity of the lung. (springer.com)
  • Invoking the theory of rubber elasticity, one considers a polymer chain in a crosslinked network as an entropic spring. (wikipedia.org)
  • An Armington elasticity is an economic parameter commonly used in models of consumer theory and international trade. (wikipedia.org)
  • Elasticity is one of the most important concepts in neoclassical economic theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the linear theory of elasticity Clapeyron's theorem states that the potential energy of deformation of a body, which is in equilibrium under a given load, is equal to half the work done by the external forces computed assuming these forces had remained constant from the initial state to the final state. (wikipedia.org)
  • Love, A.E.H., "A Treatise on the Mathematical Theory of Elasticity", 4th ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • polymers
  • For rubbers and other polymers, elasticity is caused by the stretching of polymer chains when forces are applied. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rubber elasticity, a well-known example of hyperelasticity, describes the mechanical behavior of many polymers, especially those with cross-links. (wikipedia.org)
  • cloud
  • For the cloud computing term, see Elasticity (cloud computing) . (wikipedia.org)
  • Elasticity is a defining characteristic that differentiates cloud computing from previously proposed computing paradigms, such as grid computing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Let us illustrate elasticity through a simple example of a service provider who wants to run a website on an IaaS cloud. (wikipedia.org)
  • When deploying applications in cloud infrastructures (IaaS/PaaS), requirements of the stakeholder need to be considered in order to ensure proper elasticity behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though traditionally one would try to find the optimal trade-off between cost and quality or performance, for real world cloud users requirements regarding the behavior are more complex and target multiple dimensions of elasticity (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • unity
  • In this case the elasticity approaches unity at low reactant concentration (S) and zero at high reactant concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • fundamental
  • Commuting has also a very low elasticity as this category of movements is related to a fundamental economic activity that provides income. (hofstra.edu)
  • general
  • Before we discuss the elasticity of gasoline, let's take a look at elasticities in general. (brainmass.com)
  • The arc elasticity is used when there is not a general function for the relationship of two variables, but two points on the relationship are known. (wikipedia.org)
  • In general, a low value of theta (high intertemporal elasticity) means that consumption growth is very sensitive to changes in the real interest rate. (wikipedia.org)