• Elastic
  • Most materials which possess elasticity in practice remain purely elastic only up to very small deformations. (wikipedia.org)
  • When describing the relative elasticities of two materials, both the modulus and the elastic limit have to be considered. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the material is isotropic, the linearized stress-strain relationship is called Hooke's law, which is often presumed to apply up to the elastic limit for most metals or crystalline materials whereas nonlinear elasticity is generally required to model large deformations of rubbery materials even in the elastic range. (wikipedia.org)
  • An elastic variable (with elasticity value greater than 1) is one which responds more than proportionally to changes in other variables. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, if a bar of iron, twelve inches long , and of one square inch area of cross-section, could be made so elastic as to stretch to twice its length, the force required to stretch it until it were twenty-four inches long would be its modulus of elasticity in weight per square inch. (chestofbooks.com)
  • This implies any control mechanism designed for elastic applications must consider in its decision process the time needed for the elasticity actions to take effect, such as provisioning another VM for a specific application component. (wikipedia.org)
  • Equation
  • If v = V max S K m + S {\displaystyle v={\frac {V_{\max }S}{K_{m}+S}}} then it can be easily shown than ε S v = K m K m + S {\displaystyle \varepsilon _{S}^{v}={\frac {K_{m}}{K_{m}+S}}} This equation illustrates the idea that elasticities need not be constants (as with mass-action laws) but can be a function of the reactant concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • physics
  • In physics, elasticity (from Greek ἐλαστός "ductible") is the ability of a body to resist a distorting influence and to return to its original size and shape when that influence or force is removed. (wikipedia.org)
  • modulus
  • The modulus of elasticity of a given material is the force required to elongate a piece of the material (whose area of cross-section is equal to one square inch) through space a distance equal to its primary length. (chestofbooks.com)
  • plasticity
  • But their most characteristic, though not perhaps their most general, property is that they combine in themselves the apparently incompatible properties of elasticity and rigidity on the one hand and plasticity on the other. (yourdictionary.com)
  • biochemical
  • The fact that different groups independently introduced the same concept implies that elasticities, or their equivalent, kinetic orders, are most likely a fundamental concept in the analysis of complex biochemical or chemical systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Income
  • On the long term, the provider's income will decrease, which also reduces the profit One potential problem is that elasticity takes time. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the elasticity is high then large changes in consumption are not very costly to consumers and as a result if the real interest rate is high they will save a large portion of their income. (wikipedia.org)
  • Commuting has also a very low elasticity as this category of movements is related to a fundamental economic activity that provides income. (hofstra.edu)
  • unity
  • In this case the elasticity approaches unity at low reactant concentration (S) and zero at high reactant concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • cloud
  • Elasticity is a defining characteristic that differentiates cloud computing from previously proposed computing paradigms, such as grid computing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Let us illustrate elasticity through a simple example of a service provider who wants to run a website on an IaaS cloud. (wikipedia.org)
  • When deploying applications in cloud infrastructures (IaaS/PaaS), requirements of the stakeholder need to be considered in order to ensure proper elasticity behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though traditionally one would try to find the optimal trade-off between cost and quality or performance, for real world cloud users requirements regarding the behavior are more complex and target multiple dimensions of elasticity (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • contrast
  • in contrast, calculation of the point elasticity requires detailed knowledge of the functional relationship and can be calculated wherever the function is defined. (wikipedia.org)
  • value
  • In general, a low value of theta (high intertemporal elasticity) means that consumption growth is very sensitive to changes in the real interest rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Where elasticity is a value between 0 and 1 (inclusive). (allegro.cc)
  • function
  • If the production function contains only one input, then the output elasticity is also an indicator of the degree of returns to scale. (wikipedia.org)
  • The arc elasticity is used when there is not a general function for the relationship of two variables, but two points on the relationship are known. (wikipedia.org)
  • measure
  • Energy elasticity is a top-line measure, as the commercial energy sources used by the country in question are normally further itemised as fossil, renewable, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Material
  • In engineering, the amount of elasticity of a material is determined by two types of material parameter. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because the elasticity of a material is described in terms of a stress-strain relation, it is essential that the terms stress and strain be defined without ambiguity. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • If the elasticity is low the consumption smoothing motive is very strong and because of this consumers will save a little and consume a lot if the real interest rate is high. (wikipedia.org)