• functional
  • Fatigue and poor health, anxiety and depression (physiological, affective and cognitive factors) may have a major impact on patients with functional dysphonia (FD), leading to time off work, reduced activity, and social withdrawal, all of which could further perpetuate and/or cause anxiety, low mood, fatigue and reduced voice use, according to new research published in the June 2011 issue of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery . (scienceblog.com)
  • The majority of the patient population included patients with functional dysphonia from the Freeman Hospital in the United Kingdom. (scienceblog.com)
  • The mean fatigue score in patients with functional dysphonia was 17.0 and 14.4 for the controls. (scienceblog.com)
  • Using the bimodal scoring system, the mean fatigue scores in functional dysphonia (5.10) and controls (3.01) were also significantly different. (scienceblog.com)
  • The mean perfectionism scores were 98.9 for patients with functional dysphonia and 91.2 for controls. (scienceblog.com)
  • The evidence in the study suggests that patients with functional dysphonia are both more fatigued and perfectionist than healthy controls. (scienceblog.com)
  • Dysphonia can be categorized into two broad main types: organic and functional. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Multiple treatments have been developed to address organic and functional causes of dysphonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptomatic
  • We used positron emission tomography with the radioligand [ 11 C]raclopride (RAC) to study striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission at the resting state and during production of symptomatic sentences and asymptomatic finger tapping in spasmodic dysphonia patients. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • clinical
  • This FOA invites basic, translational and clinical studies to accelerate research into promising therapeutic approaches for spasmodic dysphonia and to stimulate progress in spasmodic dysphonia research through encouraging and facilitating transdisciplinary interactions. (nih.gov)
  • results
  • According to study results, the current literature on dysphonia has a tendency to paint a rather homogenous picture of distress plus repression as the main pathogenic factor in vocal dysfunction. (scienceblog.com)