• zero-tolerance
  • Ahead of the first special session of the United Nations General Assembly on global drug policy in nearly two decades health officials from around the world have formed a commission and authored a report to persuade officials to walk back the zero-tolerance policies of the past 50 years, which they say have harmed public health instead of protecting it. (vice.com)
  • The tolerance is even lower for commercial drivers (0.04 percent) and drivers under the age of 21, for whom "zero tolerance" is given (0.02 percent). (oklahoma-criminal-defense.com)
  • The amendment to 47 O.S. ยง 11-902 (a) adds a clause pertaining to zero tolerance for driving under the influence of drugs. (oklahoma-criminal-defense.com)
  • Some Swedish maintenance treatment programmes have 'zero tolerance' against lateral use, which means that a patient can be discharged from treatment after a single positive urine test (Heilig & Gunne, 2008). (drugwarfacts.org)
  • National Insti
  • The National Institute on Drug Abuse has said that an increase in prescription opioid abuse in the US has led to a corresponding increase in heroin use because heroin is a cheaper, readily available alternative. (vice.com)
  • Amphetamine
  • Tolerance is expected to develop with regular substituted amphetamine use. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is a prescription drug in many countries, and unauthorized possession and distribution of amphetamine are often tightly controlled due to the significant health risks associated with recreational use. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adderall, Adderall XR, and Mydayis are combination drugs containing four salts of the two enantiomers of amphetamine, a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant of the phenethylamine class. (wikipedia.org)
  • cross tolerance
  • In a study in rats cross-tolerance between the benzodiazepine drug chlordiazepoxide and bretazenil has been demonstrated. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a primate study bretazenil was found to be able to replace the full agonist diazepam in diazepam dependent primates without precipitating withdrawal effects, demonstrating cross tolerance between bretazenil and benzodiazepine agonists, whereas other partial agonists precipitated a withdrawal syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cross-tolerance has also been shown between bretazenil and full agonist benzodiazepines in rats. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amphetamines
  • When substituted amphetamines are abused, drug tolerance develops rapidly. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Cochrane Collaboration's reviews on the treatment of ADHD in children, adolescents, and adults with pharmaceutical amphetamines stated that while these drugs improve short-term symptoms, they have higher discontinuation rates than non-stimulant medications due to their adverse side effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Efficacy
  • It is thought that improving ethA expression will increase the efficacy of ethionamide and prompting interest by drug developers in EthR inhibitors as a co-drug. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is rarely prescribed due to concerns involving human neurotoxicity and potential for recreational use as an aphrodisiac and euphoriant, among other concerns, as well as the availability of safer substitute drugs with comparable treatment efficacy. (wikipedia.org)
  • substance
  • This type of tolerance is the brain actively working to mitigate the effect of a foreign substance. (recoveryfirst.org)
  • Nerve cells, transmission processes, reuptake and receptor sites can be adjusted by the brain to become desensitized to the drugs, effectively producing an antidote to the substance or increasing the amount of receptor sites in order to diffuse the chemical across a wider spread of sites and thereby lessen its effects. (recoveryfirst.org)
  • This type of tolerance is not well-understood, but refers to the fact that in some cases the brain will selectively mitigate some effects of a substance, but not others. (recoveryfirst.org)
  • doses
  • This reduces the effect of the drug and in general means that in order to achieve the same effects, addicts will need to increase their doses. (recoveryfirst.org)
  • alcohol
  • For example, heavy drinkers initially develop tolerance to alcohol (requiring them to drink larger amounts to achieve a similar effect) but excessive drinking can cause liver damage, which then puts them at risk of intoxication when drinking even very small amounts of alcohol. (wikipedia.org)
  • David Nutt from the University of Bristol has suggested bretazenil as a possible base from which to make a better social drug, as it displays several of the positive effects of alcohol intoxication such as relaxation and sociability, but without the bad effects such as aggression, amnesia, nausea, loss of coordination, liver disease and brain damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • cocaine
  • People who consume a lot of drugs, like caffeine or cocaine, eventually build up a kind of tolerance, and they need more and more to get the same effect. (physicsforums.com)
  • Part of the problem with many drugs - including cocaine , meth and heroin , is that the brain cannot dispose of the drugs on its own. (recoveryfirst.org)
  • potent
  • While dextromethamphetamine is a more potent drug, racemic methamphetamine is sometimes illicitly produced due to the relative ease of synthesis and limited availability of chemical precursors. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Methamphetamine (contracted from N-methylamphetamine) is a strong central nervous system (CNS) stimulant that is mainly used as a recreational drug and less commonly as a second-line treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obesity. (wikipedia.org)
  • marijuana
  • Q: My Company wants to institute a drug testing policy that would automatically disqualify an applicant for employment if they test positive for illegal drugs, including medically-prescribed marijuana. (hiringtofiring.law)
  • In that case, the employee was fired after her first day of work for failing a drug test, despite the fact that the employee had informed the company that her doctor has prescribed marijuana as a way to manage her Crohn's disease. (hiringtofiring.law)
  • That means that employers will not be able to rely on positive drug test results for marijuana for employees working in non-safety-related positions without engaging in the interactive process with the employee or applicant. (hiringtofiring.law)
  • refers
  • Inverse tolerance is effectively the same as the Kindling Effect , which refers to changes in the brain and central nervous system concerning the way chemicals are processed. (recoveryfirst.org)
  • interactions
  • In most cases the brain relies on the interactions between neurotransmitters and receptors, but drugs interrupt this process, leaving the brain helpless to respond. (recoveryfirst.org)
  • The easiest way to lookup drug information, identify pills, check interactions and set up your own personal medication records. (drugs.com)
  • opiates
  • It is entirely possible to build tolerance to some of the more positive effects of opiates VERY quickly, especially when taking them multiple times a day. (drugs-forum.com)
  • effects
  • Increasing its dosage may re-amplify the drug's effects, however this may accelerate tolerance, further reducing the drug's effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • I understand that tolerance can build up over time, but going from 30 mg. to 150 mg. in a week or two and not feeling the effects seems to be rather odd. (drugs-forum.com)
  • It may also be that You has built tolerance to the euphoria but not some of the painkilling effects, yet. (drugs-forum.com)
  • However, tolerance developed to the anticonvulsant effects of bretazenil partial agonist more quickly than they developed to imidazenil. (wikipedia.org)
  • effect
  • 1.0 mM).Combined treatment (Zn+DPA) showed a highly synergistic effect in KO cells as compared to single drug treatment (Fig. 5C). (nih.gov)
  • Would there be a tolerance effect there? (shroomery.org)
  • Much of drug rehabilitation consists of resisting and reversing the ramping effect. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diflunisal also has an antipyretic effect, but this is not a recommended use of the drug. (wikipedia.org)
  • In macaques, after BufferGel's effect on microflora and pH were measured by vaginal colposcopy and rectal lavage researchers determined that it fit the safety profile of a drug which could be tested on humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • substances
  • As methamphetamine is associated with a high potential for misuse, the drug is regulated under the Controlled Substances Act and is listed under Schedule II in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • increase
  • A medical intervention that has for objective to increase tolerance (e.g., allergen immunotherapy, in which one is exposed to larger and larger amounts of allergen to decrease one's allergic reactions) is called drug desensitization. (wikipedia.org)
  • This may be caused by an increase in induction of the enzymes required for degradation of the drug e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • state
  • He is not sure that they would return someone's serotonin receptors to a pre-drug state, which might be necessary to get a first time feeling. (drugs-forum.com)
  • Although tolerance is widely considered a passive state, there is evidence indicating it can be an energy-dependent process. (wikipedia.org)
  • dosage
  • Pharmaceutical dextroamphetamine sulfate is available as both a brand name and generic drug in a variety of dosage forms. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Flupirtine showed promise for fibromyalgia due to its different action than the three approved by U.S. FDA drugs: pregabalin, milnacipran, and duloxetine. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • Phase I trials have shown the drug to be well tolerated, with a small Phase II trial (double-blind, placebo-controlled, 130 patients for 2 years) in 2013 showing a reduced rate of disease progression and preserved quality of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multidrug tolerance is caused by a small subpopulation of microbial cells termed persisters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yeast persisters are triggered in a small subset of unperturbed exponentially growing cells by spontaneously occurring DNA damage, which leads to the activation of a general stress response and protection against a range of harsh drug and stress environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Ethionamide is well absorbed orally with or without food, but is often administered with food to improve tolerance. (wikipedia.org)