• zinc fingers
  • Zinc finger inhibitors, or zinc ejectors, are substances or compounds that interact adversely with zinc fingers and cause them to release their zinc from its binding site, disrupting the conformation of the polypeptide chain and rendering the zinc fingers ineffective, thereby preventing them from performing their associated cellular functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • As zinc fingers are known to be involved in m-RNA regulation, reverse transcription, protection of synthesized viral DNA, transcription inhibition, and initial integration processes, prevention of zinc finger function can have drastic effects on the function of the cell or virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main drawback with this procedure is the specificities of individual zinc fingers can overlap and can depend on the context of the surrounding zinc fingers and DNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • This system combines pre-selected pools of individual zinc fingers that were each selected to bind a given triplet and then utilizes a second round of selection to obtain 3-finger arrays capable of binding a desired 9-bp sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • ZFNs
  • Zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) are artificial restriction enzymes generated by fusing a zinc finger DNA-binding domain to a DNA-cleavage domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The DNA-binding domains of individual ZFNs typically contain between three and six individual zinc finger repeats and can each recognize between 9 and 18 basepairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • This cleavage domain must dimerize in order to cleave DNA and thus a pair of ZFNs are required to target non-palindromic DNA sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • To let the two cleavage domains dimerize and cleave DNA, the two individual ZFNs must bind opposite strands of DNA with their C-termini a certain distance apart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several different protein engineering techniques have been employed to improve both the activity and specificity of the nuclease domain used in ZFNs. (wikipedia.org)
  • ZFNs can be used to disable dominant mutations in heterozygous individuals by producing double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the DNA (see Genetic recombination) in the mutant allele, which will, in the absence of a homologous template, be repaired by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). (wikipedia.org)
  • Scientists demonstrated efficient ZFN-mediated correction of a defective human Factor IX gene in a mouse model of hemophilia B by delivering ZFNs and a corrected donor DNA sequence directly into the animals. (bio-medicine.org)
  • site
  • The binding of zinc (II) in the CCHC binding site is necessary for the domain to be functional and for the stabilization of the conformation of the structure, allowing the NCp7 to carry out the processes required for HIV replication. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the CCHC binding site is mutation resistant and involved in the replication of HIV-1, it makes a prime candidate for the prevention of HIV through zinc ejectors. (wikipedia.org)
  • This electrophilic interaction destabilizes the zinc binding site making it easier for the zinc ion to be withdrawn due to the new arrangement of bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • The binding site then performs a disulfide exchange, forming new intermolecular disulfide bonds, and rearrangement occurs placing the zinc finger in a conformation that inhibits its function. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most commonly used linker sequences between the zinc finger domain and the cleavage domain requires the 5' edge of each binding site to be separated by 5 to 7 bp. (wikipedia.org)