• white distemper
  • Any pigment is added before the size (including a little indigo and ivory black to prevent yellowing with time in white distemper). (spab.org.uk)
  • Because ordinary camouflage patterns were worse than useless in the heavy snow conditions on the Eastern front, aircraft, tanks, and other military vehicles were hastily brush-painted with plain white distemper during the winter of 1941/1942. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • It was long believed that animals in the family Felidae, including many species of large cat as well as domestic cats, were resistant to canine distemper, until some researchers reported the prevalence of CDV infection in large felids. (wikipedia.org)
  • colours
  • to give adhesion to the tints and colours in distemper painting, and to make them keep their place, they are variously mixed with the size of glue (prepared commonly by dissolving about four ounces of glue in a gallon of water). (wikipedia.org)
  • Besides
  • Besides its visual characteristics and velvety feel, soft distemper can be identified by its solubility in water. (spab.org.uk)
  • Besides being cheap, distempers were also popular because they could be applied over newly plastered walls and ceilings. (monticello.org)
  • lime
  • Soft distemper allows the fabric to 'breathe' and does not react ('saponify') on new lime plaster. (spab.org.uk)
  • Therefore distempers, along with lime-based whitewashes, were virtually the only paints used on newly plastered walls in Jefferson's time. (monticello.org)
  • widely
  • The earliest paintings on canvas were mostly in distemper, which was (and is) also widely used in Asia, especially in Tibetan thankas. (wikipedia.org)
  • paint
  • In the form of whiting, one of its uses is as an important constituent of soft distemper paint. (spab.org.uk)
  • Soft distemper is a water-based paint that primarily comprises a white base pigment (generally water-soaked whiting, ie pulverised chalk) bound with glue size (glue made from animal parts). (spab.org.uk)
  • Soft distemper is not to be confused with oil-bound or 'washable' distemper, an oil-based water paint that was the forerunner to modern emulsion. (spab.org.uk)
  • Drawbacks are that painters must work fast to maintain a 'wet edge', soft distemper will not withstand heavy wear, the finish is less wipeable than most and unused paint soon turns rancid! (spab.org.uk)
  • When colour matching, the old paint should be wetted or the new sample left to dry because soft distemper lightens as moisture evaporates. (spab.org.uk)
  • Clearcole (diluted size) is the normal primer, although a thinned oil-based undercoat can be preferable where oil paint is ultimately intended if soft distemper is being used temporarily to avoid saponification. (spab.org.uk)
  • If it's an old house you may find distemper which is an old form of paint made from whiting and glue. (diyfixit.co.uk)
  • Failure to deal with distemper will lead either to new paint flaking off, or to the new paper failing to adhere properly. (diyfixit.co.uk)
  • In this case Buck's findings revealed that the first paint layer found on top of the plaster was a distemper paint. (monticello.org)
  • Earlier paint investigations have also revealed that Jefferson clearly liked distempers and used them for other rooms at Monticello, including bedrooms, stairwells, and the Dome Room. (monticello.org)
  • The next challenge, which will be detailed in a future blog post, was to develop and apply a historically accurate distemper paint using the color sample and pigment identification provided by Buck. (monticello.org)
  • Distemper is a paint used in decorating and an historical medium for painting pictures, and contrasted with tempera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many Medieval and Renaissance painters used distemper painting rather than oil paint for some of their works. (wikipedia.org)
  • In modern practice, distemper painting is often employed for scenery painting in theatrical productions and other short-term applications, where it may be preferred to oil paint for reasons of economy. (wikipedia.org)
  • chalk
  • Distempers are ancient paints made from water, ground chalk, hide glue, and, if a color other than white is desired, pigments such as ocher and lamp black. (monticello.org)
  • Soft distemper is not abrasion resistant and may include binders such as chalk, ground pigments, and animal glue. (wikipedia.org)