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  • white distemper
  • Any pigment is added before the size (including a little indigo and ivory black to prevent yellowing with time in white distemper). (spab.org.uk)
  • Because ordinary camouflage patterns were worse than useless in the heavy snow conditions on the Eastern front, aircraft, tanks, and other military vehicles were hastily brush-painted with plain white distemper during the winter of 1941/1942. (wikipedia.org)
  • dogs
  • Everything Shelters Need to Know About Canine Distemper is part of an ongoing series of educational programs from Maddie's Institute, the academic division of Maddie's Fund ® , providing the most innovative animal welfare information to shelter staff, veterinarians, rescue groups and community members to increase the lifesaving of homeless dogs and cats community-wide. (maddiesfund.org)
  • Although dogs are the most commonly affected, Canine Distemper is also seen in foxes, ferrets, mink and many other carnivores. (petsblogs.com)
  • Canine Distemper was at one time the leading cause of deaths in domesticated dogs. (petsblogs.com)
  • It is a very serious illness and as many as 75% of all dogs who get distemper die from it. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Puppies should not be taken to dog parks or other places where many dogs visit until those puppies are fully vaccinated against distemper. (petwave.com)
  • Dogs who are properly vaccinated may still contract distemper under circumstances of extreme stress or when their immune systems are especially compromised, although that is uncommon. (petwave.com)
  • In dogs, signs of distemper vary widely from no signs, to mild respiratory signs indistinguishable from kennel cough, to severe pneumonia with vomiting, bloody diarrhea and death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dogs that have been infected with distemper tend to suffer a progressive deterioration of mental abilities and motor skills. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • It was long believed that animals in the family Felidae, including many species of large cat as well as domestic cats, were resistant to canine distemper, until some researchers reported the prevalence of CDV infection in large felids. (wikipedia.org)
  • colours
  • to give adhesion to the tints and colours in distemper painting, and to make them keep their place, they are variously mixed with the size of glue (prepared commonly by dissolving about four ounces of glue in a gallon of water). (wikipedia.org)
  • widely
  • The earliest paintings on canvas were mostly in distemper, which was (and is) also widely used in Asia, especially in Tibetan thankas. (wikipedia.org)
  • guide
  • Distemper Records) 2003: Путеводитель по русскому року (The Russian rock guide) (BRP Rec. (wikipedia.org)
  • paint
  • In the form of whiting, one of its uses is as an important constituent of soft distemper paint. (spab.org.uk)
  • Soft distemper is a water-based paint that primarily comprises a white base pigment (generally water-soaked whiting, ie pulverised chalk) bound with glue size (glue made from animal parts). (spab.org.uk)
  • Soft distemper is not to be confused with oil-bound or 'washable' distemper, an oil-based water paint that was the forerunner to modern emulsion. (spab.org.uk)
  • Drawbacks are that painters must work fast to maintain a 'wet edge', soft distemper will not withstand heavy wear, the finish is less wipeable than most and unused paint soon turns rancid! (spab.org.uk)
  • When colour matching, the old paint should be wetted or the new sample left to dry because soft distemper lightens as moisture evaporates. (spab.org.uk)
  • Clearcole (diluted size) is the normal primer, although a thinned oil-based undercoat can be preferable where oil paint is ultimately intended if soft distemper is being used temporarily to avoid saponification. (spab.org.uk)
  • If it's an old house you may find distemper which is an old form of paint made from whiting and glue. (diyfixit.co.uk)
  • Failure to deal with distemper will lead either to new paint flaking off, or to the new paper failing to adhere properly. (diyfixit.co.uk)
  • Distemper is a paint used in decorating and an historical medium for painting pictures, and contrasted with tempera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many Medieval and Renaissance painters used distemper painting rather than oil paint for some of their works. (wikipedia.org)
  • In modern practice, distemper painting is often employed for scenery painting in theatrical productions and other short-term applications, where it may be preferred to oil paint for reasons of economy. (wikipedia.org)
  • signs
  • A dog that survives distemper will continue to have both nonlife-threatening and life-threatening signs throughout its lifespan. (wikipedia.org)
  • show
  • Genetic studies of the canine distemper viruses in the U.S. may show strains that were previously undetected here, but it's almost impossible to determine if these strains are newly arrived or just newly detected because of improvements in testing. (petmd.com)
  • Homeopathic (natural/herbal) approaches have been show to be effective in treating and preventing distemper. (dog-health-guide.org)
  • Because distemper is water-soluble, photographs showing winter camouflage often show it badly eroded. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • If your dog is recovering from distemper and able to eat and drink on her own and get around reasonably well, it is likely that she will have at least this level of functioning for some time and should be able to live with a decent quality of life. (vetinfo.com)
  • word
  • The origin of the word distemper is from the Middle English distemperen, meaning to upset the balance of the humors, which is from the Old French destemprer, meaning to disturb, which is from the Vulgar Latin distemperare: Latin dis- and Latin temperare, meaning to not mix properly. (wikipedia.org)