• innovation
  • Disruptive innovation is a term in the field of business administration which refers to an innovation that creates a new market and value network and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network, displacing established market leading firms, products, and alliances. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the first automobiles in the late 19th century were not a disruptive innovation, because early automobiles were expensive luxury items that did not disrupt the market for horse-drawn vehicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mass-produced automobile was a disruptive innovation, because it changed the transportation market, whereas the first thirty years of automobiles did not. (wikipedia.org)
  • The concept of disruptive technology continues a long tradition of identifying radical technical change in the study of innovation by economists, and the development of tools for its management at a firm or policy level. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "disruptive innovation" is misleading when it is used to refer to a product or service at one fixed point, rather than to the evolution of that product or service over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • To them, the problem Pollack describes is ho-hum and a recent Goldman Sachs report that he quotes -- "bioinformatics for genetic analysis will be one of the biggest areas of disruptive innovation in life science tools over the next few years" -- is the news they've been covering for a decade. (forbes.com)
  • The disruptive solutions process (DSP) is a concept for innovation execution applied to the mishap prevention part of the combat operations process, often at tactical or operational level, primarily in Air National Guard applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • theoretical
  • Minimally Disruptive Medicine has a theoretical basis in Normalization Process Theory, which explains the processes by which treatment regimens and other ensembles of cognitive, behavioural and technical practices are routinely incorporated in everyday life. (wikipedia.org)
  • pattern
  • He draws an analogy with a pickpocket who carefully distracts your attention, arguing that: The function of a disruptive pattern is to prevent, or to delay as long as possible, the first recognition of an object by sight. (wikipedia.org)
  • In his words: The disruptive value of a pattern lies in its tendency to hide the real form of an animal by suggesting a false form to the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • Officially named DPDU (Disruptive Pattern Desert Uniform), a DPCU variant designed for desert conditions using different colours, was first tested in 1998 at the Woomera Missile Test Site in South Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • New Zealand DPM is very similar to the British Disruptive Pattern Material. (wikipedia.org)
  • episode
  • In this episode of Disruptive, Wyss Institute Founding Director Don Ingber and Senior Staff Scientist Mike Super discuss how their team developed a new therapeutic device inspired by the human spleen. (harvard.edu)
  • technology
  • Today on Edgewise Geoffrey Colon , author of the new AMACOM book Disruptive Marketing, joins us for a freewheeling conversation about music, technology, ethics, and taking the fear out of failure. (amanet.org)
  • rather, it is the business model that the technology enables that creates the disruptive impact. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cryptocurrencies could possibly be the single most disruptive technology to global financial and economic systems" by virtue of the fact that current financial and legal structures were designed with a completely different mindset and purpose, wrote Peter DeVries, a professor of information systems at the University of Houston in Texas, in an article published in September 2016 in the International Journal of Business Management and Commerce. (executive-magazine.com)
  • It is defined as a "disruptive technology" requiring a complete change in current manufacturing processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ideas
  • The "process" is executed similar to a venture capitalist's portfolio of projects in that the team invests small amounts of resources in many disruptive ideas. (wikipedia.org)
  • main
  • It is believed that disruptive selection is one of the main forces that drive sympatric speciation in natural populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • business
  • The business environment of market leaders does not allow them to pursue disruptive innovations when they first arise, because they are not profitable enough at first and because their development can take scarce resources away from sustaining innovations (which are needed to compete against current competition). (wikipedia.org)
  • Beyond business and economics disruptive innovations can also be considered to disrupt complex systems, including economic and business-related aspects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Where Business + Culture Collide Disruptive FM is sponsored by Microsoft and Branding Strategy Insider. (tunein.com)
  • impact
  • In my experience, the only thing that has had any impact on chronically disruptive students is to make some kind of personal connection with them. (nea.org)
  • A disruptive process can take longer to develop than by the conventional approach and the risk associated to it is higher than the other more incremental or evolutionary forms of innovations, but once it is deployed in the market, it achieves a much faster penetration and higher degree of impact on the established markets. (wikipedia.org)
  • approach
  • Minimally Disruptive Medicine is an approach to patient care in chronic illness proposed by Carl R May, Victor Montori, and Frances Mair. (wikipedia.org)
  • Minimally Disruptive Medicine is an approach to designing patient care that seeks to consider the effects of treatment work, and in particular to prevent overburdening patients . (wikipedia.org)
  • Such a disruptive, iterative approach may not be appropriate in otherwise hardware-centric, large budget programs, such an aircraft procurement and production. (wikipedia.org)
  • To address the safety cultural issues associated with mishap prevention in a large bureaucracy, Air National Guard safety directorate pursued a disruptive approach in requirement definition, problem identification, solution vetting, funding, and procurement. (wikipedia.org)
  • mind
  • It is important to keep in mind that disruptive selection does not always have to be based on intraspecific competition, so in some cases that step of the pathway can be eliminated. (wikipedia.org)
  • It's with this in mind that I've gone on a bit of a memory dig to come up with the most disruptive gadgets of the past decade. (thenextweb.com)
  • read
  • Check out more at http://blakeproject.com and read more at http://brandingstrategyinsider.com On the latest Disruptive FM we hope you enjoy our new imaging and podcast theme song! (tunein.com)
  • found
  • Hello [ColleagueName], I found this podcast titled Geoffrey Colon on Disruptive Marketing on the AMA Website that may help in professional development. (amanet.org)
  • employees
  • Generally, governmental employers, including law enforcement agencies, can fire or discipline employees for being disruptive and for complaining excessively. (shrm.org)