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  • innovation
  • Disruptive Innovation in context of the author's body of work in healthcare and rehabilitation relates to how development of a cloud-based converged infrastructure resource, similar to that conceived in a national (Danish) study titled Humanics, can act as an accessible data and knowledge repository, virtual consultancy, networking, and training resource to inform and support fields of researchers, practitioners and professionals. (springer.com)
  • To them, the problem Pollack describes is ho-hum and a recent Goldman Sachs report that he quotes -- "bioinformatics for genetic analysis will be one of the biggest areas of disruptive innovation in life science tools over the next few years" -- is the news they've been covering for a decade. (forbes.com)
  • Disruptive innovation is a term in the field of business administration which refers to an innovation that creates a new market and value network and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network, displacing established market leading firms, products, and alliances. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the first automobiles in the late 19th century were not a disruptive innovation, because early automobiles were expensive luxury items that did not disrupt the market for horse-drawn vehicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mass-produced automobile was a disruptive innovation, because it changed the transportation market, whereas the first thirty years of automobiles did not. (wikipedia.org)
  • The concept of disruptive technology continues a long tradition of identifying radical technical change in the study of innovation by economists, and the development of tools for its management at a firm or policy level. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term "disruptive innovation" is misleading when it is used to refer to a product or service at one fixed point, rather than to the evolution of that product or service over time. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disruptive solutions process (DSP) is a concept for innovation execution applied to the mishap prevention part of the combat operations process, often at tactical or operational level, primarily in Air National Guard applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorder
  • Disruptive Mood Dysregulation Disorder (DMDD) is a relatively new diagnosis in the field of mental health. (aacap.org)
  • Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD) is a mental disorder in children and adolescents characterized by a persistently irritable or angry mood and frequent temper outbursts that are disproportionate to the situation and significantly more severe than the typical reaction of same-aged peers. (wikipedia.org)
  • theoretical
  • Minimally Disruptive Medicine has a theoretical basis in Normalization Process Theory, which explains the processes by which treatment regimens and other ensembles of cognitive, behavioural and technical practices are routinely incorporated in everyday life. (wikipedia.org)
  • innovations
  • Not all innovations are disruptive, even if they are revolutionary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disruptive innovations tend to be produced by outsiders and entrepreneurs, rather than existing market-leading companies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The business environment of market leaders does not allow them to pursue disruptive innovations when they first arise, because they are not profitable enough at first and because their development can take scarce resources away from sustaining innovations (which are needed to compete against current competition). (wikipedia.org)
  • A disruptive process can take longer to develop than by the conventional approach and the risk associated to it is higher than the other more incremental or evolutionary forms of innovations, but once it is deployed in the market, it achieves a much faster penetration and higher degree of impact on the established markets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beyond business and economics disruptive innovations can also be considered to disrupt complex systems, including economic and business-related aspects. (wikipedia.org)
  • In keeping with the insight that what matters economically is the business model, not the technological sophistication itself, Christensen's theory explains why many disruptive innovations are not "advanced technologies", which the technology mudslide hypothesis would lead one to expect. (wikipedia.org)
  • pattern
  • He draws an analogy with a pickpocket who carefully distracts your attention, arguing that: The function of a disruptive pattern is to prevent, or to delay as long as possible, the first recognition of an object by sight. (wikipedia.org)
  • In his words: The disruptive value of a pattern lies in its tendency to hide the real form of an animal by suggesting a false form to the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • Officially named DPDU (Disruptive Pattern Desert Uniform), a DPCU variant designed for desert conditions using different colours, was first tested in 1998 at the Woomera Missile Test Site in South Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • New Zealand DPM is very similar to the British Disruptive Pattern Material. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ideas
  • The "process" is executed similar to a venture capitalist's portfolio of projects in that the team invests small amounts of resources in many disruptive ideas. (wikipedia.org)
  • impact
  • In my experience, the only thing that has had any impact on chronically disruptive students is to make some kind of personal connection with them. (nea.org)
  • book
  • Today on Edgewise Geoffrey Colon , author of the new AMACOM book Disruptive Marketing, joins us for a freewheeling conversation about music, technology, ethics, and taking the fear out of failure. (amanet.org)
  • include
  • Historical examples include: Bashar al-Assad Hastings Banda François "Papa Doc" Duvalier Félix Houphouët-Boigny Radovan Karadžić William Walker Bullying in medicine Doc Martin Medical drama Medical malpractice The No Asshole Rule Robert M. Wachter (May 22, 2012), Gregory House M.D.: RIP, USA Today "The Disruptive Physician", Professionalism in Psychiatry, American Psychiatric Pub. (wikipedia.org)
  • approach
  • Minimally Disruptive Medicine is an approach to patient care in chronic illness proposed by Carl R May, Victor Montori, and Frances Mair. (wikipedia.org)
  • Minimally Disruptive Medicine is an approach to designing patient care that seeks to consider the effects of treatment work, and in particular to prevent overburdening patients . (wikipedia.org)
  • Such a disruptive, iterative approach may not be appropriate in otherwise hardware-centric, large budget programs, such an aircraft procurement and production. (wikipedia.org)
  • To address the safety cultural issues associated with mishap prevention in a large bureaucracy, Air National Guard safety directorate pursued a disruptive approach in requirement definition, problem identification, solution vetting, funding, and procurement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Report
  • In this report, we'll explore some of the disruptive trends that are affecting pretty much everything over the next few yearsat least those that I'm following. (slideshare.net)
  • turn
  • When disruptive selection is based on intraspecific competition, it in turn promotes ecological niche diversification and polymorphisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • Hello [ColleagueName], I found this podcast titled Geoffrey Colon on Disruptive Marketing on the AMA Website that may help in professional development. (amanet.org)
  • employees
  • Generally, governmental employers, including law enforcement agencies, can fire or discipline employees for being disruptive and for complaining excessively. (shrm.org)