• urine
  • it is when atrophy of tubule epithelium is "pinched off," creating eosinophilic, proteinaceous hyaline casts in the urine. (brainscape.com)
  • 2 o Cushing s disease or the use of steroids can cause mild increases in the amount of protein in the urine. (docplayer.net)
  • Urinalysis: This examines the urine for increases in white blood cells, red blood cells, and other sediment that indicates disease of the urinary tract or of the kidneys. (docplayer.net)
  • Urine protein/ creatinine ratio: This test looks to see if protein is being excreted by the kidneys in quantities higher than creatinine, a metabolic product that is normally filtered and excreted by the kidneys. (docplayer.net)
  • Proteins such as albumin appear in urine when the kidneys are damaged. (reference.com)
  • In overflow aminoaciduria, abnormally high concentrations of amino acids in the blood plasma overwhelm the resorptive capacity of the renal tubules, resulting in high concentrations of amino acids in the urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In renal aminoaciduria, the renal tubules are unable to reabsorb the filtered amino acids back into the blood, causing high concentrations of amino acids in the urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is one cause of Fanconi syndrome, and is characterized by tubular proteinuria, excess calcium in the urine, formation of calcium kidney stones, nephrocalcinosis, and chronic kidney failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • A combination of 25 mg of chlorthalidone plus 5 mg of amiloride daily led to a substantial reduction in urine calcium in Dent's patients, but urine pH was "significantly higher in patients with Dent's disease than in those with idiopathic hypercalciuria (P (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of its rather rare occurrence, Dent's disease is often diagnosed as idiopathic hypercalciuria, i.e., excess calcium in urine with undetermined causes. (wikipedia.org)
  • may result in a decrease in kidney blood flow, resulting in a decrease in the production of urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Minimal change disease typically presents with edema, an increase in proteins passed from urine and decrease in blood protein levels, and an increase in circulating lipids (i.e., nephrotic syndrome) and is the most common cause of the nephrotic syndrome in children. (wikipedia.org)
  • The failure of amino-acid transport was reported in 1960 from the increased presence of indoles (bacterial metabolites of tryptophan) and tryptophan in the urine of patients as part of a generalized aminoaciduria of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the increased uric acid levels in urine can contribute to kidney stones. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to the glomerulopathy described above, kidney complications of sickle cell disease include cortical infarcts leading to loss of function, persistent bloody urine, and perinephric hematomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disorders
  • See also Introduction to Disorders of Kidney Tubules . (merckmanuals.com)
  • Absent in patients suffering with peroxisomal disorders such as Zellweger syndrome, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy and infantile Refsum disease. (genecards.org)
  • This may be caused by congenital disorders of amino acid metabolism, for example, phenylketonuria, or may be secondary to liver disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dent's disease" is often used to describe an entire group of familial disorders, including X-linked recessive nephrolithiasis with kidney failure, X-linked recessive hypophosphatemic rickets, and both Japanese and idiopathic low-molecular-weight proteinuria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Causes for these disorders include congenital anomalies, infectious diseases, trauma, or conditions that secondarily involve the urinary structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, medical disorders of the kidneys are generally within the expertise of renal pathologists. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plasma cell dyscrasias (also termed plasma cell disorders and plasma cell proliferative diseases) are a spectrum of progressively more severe monoclonal gammopathies in which a clone or multiple clones of pre-malignant or malignant plasma cells (sometimes in association with lymphoplasmacytoid cells or B lymphocytes) over-produce and secrete into the blood stream a myeloma protein, i.e. an abnormal monoclonal antibody or portion thereof. (wikipedia.org)
  • tubular
  • This happens because of a defect in the tubular cells of the kidneys that decreases the reabsorption of glucose. (merckmanuals.com)
  • The expression of cluster of differentiation 36 (CD36) involved in the transport of FA is induced by high glucose in proximal tubular cells and causes palmitate-induced apoptosis only in human kidneys with diabetic tubular epithelial degeneration ( 11 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Recessive mutations in XPNPEP3 gene has been identified as a cause of an nephronophthisis-like disease, characterized by renal interstitial infiltration with fibrosis, tubular atrophy with basement membrane disruption, and cyst development at the corticomedullary renal border. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some lab tests on mice with CLC-5-related tubular damage showed a high-citrate diet preserved kidney function and delayed progress of kidney disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dent's disease was first described by Charles Enrique Dent and M. Friedman in 1964, when they reported two unrelated British boys with rickets associated with renal tubular damage characterized by hypercalciuria, hyperphosphaturia, proteinuria, and aminoaciduria. (wikipedia.org)
  • excretion
  • citation needed] Alcohol stimulates the kidneys' excretion of magnesium, which is also increased because of alcoholic and diabetic ketoacidosis, low blood phosphate levels, and hyperaldosteronism resulting from liver disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Hartnup disease, urinary excretion of proline, hydroxyproline, and arginine remains unchanged, differentiating it from other causes of generalized aminoaciduria, such as Fanconi syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proteins
  • We propose to study the contribution of cell division to the formation of renal tubules in normal and pathological conditions, by focusing on the following questions: (1) What are the non-ciliary roles of IFT proteins? (cnrs.fr)
  • Abnormalities
  • We can also evaluate the kidney to see if any obvious abnormalities are present 4 DX Test: This blood test evaluates 4 different blood borne diseases that are spread by biting insects. (docplayer.net)
  • Functional tubule abnormalities such as nephrogenic diabetes insipidus result from marked reduction in vasa recta blood flow, combined with ischemic tubule injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • glomerulonephritis
  • Treatment may involve corticosteroids, but up to half of people with focal segmental glomerulonephritis continue to have progressive deterioration of kidney function, ending in kidney failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • renal failure
  • Kidney is one of the vulnerable organs suffered from the high-intensity exercise or overload training, manifesting as cystorrhexis, hematuria, proteinuria, acute renal failure etc. (biomedcentral.com)
  • reabsorb
  • In the healthy kidney, the glomeruli filter all amino acids out of the blood, and the renal tubules then reabsorb over 95% of the filtered amino acids back into the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consequently, a person with Hartnup disease cannot absorb amino acids properly from the intestine and cannot reabsorb them properly from tubules in the kidneys. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathological
  • 0.01), and the pathological changes of kidney cell were much less compared with those of rats without EPO intervention. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The present study was designed to determine the histological and ultrastructural changes in kidney cell of the rats after relatively long exhaustive exercise, evaluate the preventive and therapeutic effects of EPO on such a pathological conditions to provide empirical evidence for the application of EPO clinically. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Our overall objective is to study the non-ciliary roles of these transport complexes, primarily during cell division, in order to identify the cellular mechanisms that contribute to kidney tube morphogenesis in normal and pathological conditions. (cnrs.fr)
  • Diabetes
  • The idea was to keep the focus on the key big risk factors that we could control and the major causes of death: heart disease, cancer and diabetes. (truth-out.org)
  • Increased fatty acid (FA) synthesis enzymes and triglyceride deposition correlated with increased profibrotic factors were found in the kidney in diabetes in rats ( 4 ) and mice ( 5 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Moreover, diabetes causes a decrease in kidney glucose oxidation due to the inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity ( 15 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • impairment
  • Viread Label Information, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)), 2008-04-11 Tenofovir (Viread) Associated with Mild Kidney Function Impairment, but not Clinically Relevant Renal Disease, hivandhepatitis.com, 2008-10-14 Irizarry-Alvarado, J. M. (wikipedia.org)
  • functional
  • Functional changes include high blood pressure, build up of toxins in the bloodstream and kidney failure. (reference.com)
  • Pathophysiology is the study of functional changes in an organ or body system that is exposed to disease. (reference.com)
  • Humans
  • Inhibition of lipid synthesis in humans ( 6 ) and amelioration of dyslipidemia ( 7 ) protect against diabetic renal disease. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Some of these diseases are unique to dogs or closely related species, while others are found in other animals, including humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rabies (hydrophobia) is a fatal viral disease that can affect any mammal, although the close relationship of dogs with humans makes canine rabies a zoonotic concern. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blastomycosis* is a fungal disease caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis that affects both dogs and humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Histoplasmosis* is a fungal disease caused by Histoplasma capsulatum that affects both dogs and humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sporotrichosis is a fungal disease caused by Sporothrix schenckii that affects both dogs and humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • sickle cell di
  • Sickle-cell trait, the heterozygous form of sickle-cell disease, presents with a normal hematological picture but is associated with isosthenuria. (wikipedia.org)
  • thyroid
  • A positive thyroid peroxidase antibody test indicates that a person's thyroid disease is likely caused by an autoimmune disorder, explains The Mayo Clinic. (reference.com)
  • Unlike in Grave's disease, however, this antibody's action results in less thyroid hormone being made. (encyclopedia.com)
  • fluid
  • Tubulointerstitial nephritis is a disease that inflames the spaces between the kidney tubules, the tubes that carry fluid for filtration inside the organ. (ahi.org)
  • Hartnup
  • Hartnup disease (also known as "pellagra-like dermatosis" and "Hartnup disorder") is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder affecting the absorption of nonpolar amino acids (particularly tryptophan that can be, in turn, converted into serotonin, melatonin, and niacin). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hartnup disease manifests during infancy with variable clinical presentation: failure to thrive, photosensitivity, intermittent ataxia, nystagmus, and tremor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hartnup disease is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait. (wikipedia.org)
  • liver
  • Gilbert's disease is a generally harmless and common liver condition that sometimes causes jaundice, a yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes, du. (reference.com)
  • Infectious canine hepatitis is a sometimes fatal infectious disease of the liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • physiology
  • Here we show that hPSC-KCs self-organize into kidney organoids that functionally recapitulate tissue-specific epithelial physiology, including disease phenotypes after genome editing. (harvard.edu)
  • He trained as a resident in Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore and as a postdoctoral investigator in kidney physiology at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. (yale.edu)
  • Finsen, Niels Ryberg Danish physician, founder of modern phototherapy (the treatment of disease by the influence of light), who received the 1903 Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for the application of light in the treatment of skin diseases. (britannica.com)
  • hereditary
  • In contrast, distinct early lesions of biallelic VHL inactivation in kidneys of the hereditary VHL syndrome show strong HIF-2α expression. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Other recognised causes are Wilson's disease (a genetically inherited condition of copper metabolism), Lowe syndrome, tyrosinemia (type I), galactosemia, glycogen storage diseases, and hereditary fructose intolerance. (wikipedia.org)
  • stones
  • 3 Abdominal Radiographs (x-rays): To look for signs of neoplasia (cancer) in the abdomen and to look for signs of urinary tract disease such as kidney stones and bladder stone. (docplayer.net)
  • urinary tract
  • We normally break these up into 4 major categories: benign, non-urinary tract related, urinary tract but not kidney related, and kidney related. (docplayer.net)
  • Urogenital malformations include: Hypospadias Epispadias Labial fusion Varicocele As a medical specialty, genitourinary pathology is the subspecialty of surgical pathology which deals with the diagnosis and characterization of neoplastic and non-neoplastic diseases of the urinary tract, male genital tract, and testes. (wikipedia.org)
  • transport
  • Tubules accumulate dextran and methotrexate transport cargoes, and express kidney injury molecule-1 after nephrotoxic chemical injury. (harvard.edu)
  • At Yale his research continued to focus on the structure and function of the kidney, with an emphasis on mechanisms of ion transport by kidney tubules in health and disease. (yale.edu)
  • The IntraFlagellar Transport machinery (IFT) in cellular functions and diseases. (cnrs.fr)
  • 90% of the kidney cortex) engage in active uptake and transepithelial transport of glucose, but only a small amount of glucose, if any, is used for ATP production ( 14 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • organs
  • Therefore, to prevent and treat the kidney and other organs injury resulted from overtraining are crucial tasks in sports medicine, modern military medicine and clinical medicine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Tubulointerstitial
  • The kidneys are the only body system that are directly affected by tubulointerstitial nephritis. (wikipedia.org)
  • In most cases of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, the function of the kidneys will return after the harmful drug is not taken anymore, or when the underlying disease is cured by treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • intestine
  • Nicotinamide is necessary for neutral amino acid transporter production in the proximal renal tubules found in the kidney, and intestinal mucosal cells found in the small intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • otherwise, the intestine and kidneys function normally, and the effects of the disease occur mainly in the brain and skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • SLC6A19 is a sodium-dependent and chloride-independent neutral amino acid transporter, expressed predominately in the kidneys and intestine. (wikipedia.org)
  • rickets
  • The loss of phosphate results in the bone diseases rickets and osteomalacia (even with adequate vitamin D and calcium levels), because phosphate is necessary for bone development in children and even for ongoing bone metabolism in adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • infectious diseases
  • When patients are diagnosed with infectious diseases, it's common for doctors to ask questions about their lifestyles and recent travel to help identify points of potential exposure. (ahi.org)
  • fatal
  • Hong Kong researchers discovered a virus, Feline morbillivirus, that may be one of the causes of a potentially fatal kidney disease in pet cats. (ahi.org)
  • Monsanto's Herbicide Linked to Fatal Kidney Disease Epidemic: Could It Topple the Company? (truth-out.org)
  • Monsanto's herbicide Roundup has been linked to a mysterious fatal kidney disease epidemic that has appeared in Central America, Sri Lanka and India. (truth-out.org)
  • Canine distemper is an often fatal infectious disease that mainly has respiratory and neurologic signs. (wikipedia.org)