• thalamus
  • Dilated perivascular spaces are categorized into three types: Type 1 are located on the lenticulostriate arteries projecting into the basal ganglia Type 2 are located in the cortex following the path of the medullary arteries Type 3 are located in the midbrain Perivascular spaces are most commonly located in the basal ganglia, thalamus, midbrain, cerebellum, hippocampus, insular cortex, the white matter of the cerebrum, and along the optic tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • cerebral
  • Cerebrovascular diseases include a group of brain dis- orders associated with cerebral vascularization. (covex.com)
  • These conditions are listed below: Perinatal (during birth) cerebral injury Kernicterus Cerebrovascular diseases Drug induced Central nervous system tumor Peripheral or central trauma Infectious or post infectious encephalopathies Toxins Metabolic Paraneoplastic syndromes Central pontine myelinolysis Secondary spasmodic torticollis is diagnosed when any of the following are present: history of exogenous insult or exposure, neurological abnormalities other than dystonia, abnormalities on brain imaging, particularly in the basal ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like the blood vessels around which they form, perivascular spaces are found in both the subarachnoid space and the subpial space.Perivascular spaces surrounding arteries in the cerebral cortex and the basal ganglia are separated from the subpial space by one or two layers of leptomeninges, respectively, as well as the pia mater. (wikipedia.org)
  • cortical
  • Initial hypodensity or loss of grey-white differentiation after 3-6hrs (grey becomes isodense to white esp cortical ribbon sign, loss of basal ganglia) due to reduced CBV, hence the earlier this occurs the worse the prognosis (profound perfusion defect). (radnotes.co.nz)
  • Symptoms
  • The National Institutes of Health recommend considering the evaluation of an underlying celiac disease in people with unexplained neurological symptoms, particularly peripheral neuropathy or ataxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • These intermediate breakdown products are particularly prone to affect the basal ganglia, causing many of the signs and symptoms of glutaric acidemia type 1. (wikipedia.org)
  • The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). (wikipedia.org)
  • Movement
  • Excessive levels of their intermediate breakdown products (glutaric acid, glutaryl-CoA, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, glutaconic acid) can accumulate and cause damage to the brain (and also other organs), but particularly the basal ganglia, which are regions that help regulate movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • The disease is usually latent, occurring up to 6 months after the acute infection, but may occasionally be the presenting symptom of rheumatic fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • A major manifestation of acute rheumatic fever, Sydenham's chorea is a result of an autoimmune response that occurs following infection by group A β-hemolytic streptococci that destroys cells in the corpus striatum of the basal ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • examination
  • Linear measures of global and temporal atrophy and Mini-Mental State Examination scores were used to adjust for AD pathology and disease severity in logistic regression models with the BPSD items delusions, hallucinations, agitation, depression, anxiety, apathy and irritability. (karger.com)
  • A neurological examination can to some extent assess the impact of neurological damage and disease on brain function in terms of behavior, memory or cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment
  • The goal of treatment for moyamoya disease is reducing the risks of recurrent strokes by doing an arterial bypass or by forming a new blood supply to the affected parts of the brain. (naturalpedia.com)
  • type
  • Speaking in a foreign accent is only one type of dysprosody, as the disease can also manifest itself in other ways, such as changes in pitch, volume, and rhythm of speech. (wikipedia.org)
  • accident
  • Marie described the case of a Frenchman who started speaking in an Alsatian accent after suffering from a cerebrovascular accident which caused right hemiplegia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Strokes
  • The most common clinical manifestations are migraine headaches and transient ischemic attacks or strokes, which usually occur between 40 and 50 years of age, although MRI is able to detect signs of the disease years prior to clinical manifestation of disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • However, about 10 percent of people suffering from Moyamoya disease have a close relative who is also affected. (naturalpedia.com)
  • Essentially, people diagnosed with the disease can comprehend language and vocalize what they intend to say, however, they are not able to control the way in which the words come out of their mouths. (wikipedia.org)
  • thought
  • Molecular mimicry to streptococcal antigens leading to an autoantibody production against the basal ganglia has long been thought to be the main mechanism by which chorea occurs in this condition. (wikipedia.org)