• thalamus
  • Dilated perivascular spaces are categorized into three types: Type 1 are located on the lenticulostriate arteries projecting into the basal ganglia Type 2 are located in the cortex following the path of the medullary arteries Type 3 are located in the midbrain Perivascular spaces are most commonly located in the basal ganglia, thalamus, midbrain, cerebellum, hippocampus, insular cortex, the white matter of the cerebrum, and along the optic tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • cerebral
  • Cerebrovascular diseases include a group of brain dis- orders associated with cerebral vascularization. (covex.com)
  • These conditions are listed below: Perinatal (during birth) cerebral injury Kernicterus Cerebrovascular diseases Drug induced Central nervous system tumor Peripheral or central trauma Infectious or post infectious encephalopathies Toxins Metabolic Paraneoplastic syndromes Central pontine myelinolysis Secondary spasmodic torticollis is diagnosed when any of the following are present: history of exogenous insult or exposure, neurological abnormalities other than dystonia, abnormalities on brain imaging, particularly in the basal ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like the blood vessels around which they form, perivascular spaces are found in both the subarachnoid space and the subpial space.Perivascular spaces surrounding arteries in the cerebral cortex and the basal ganglia are separated from the subpial space by one or two layers of leptomeninges, respectively, as well as the pia mater. (wikipedia.org)
  • cortical
  • Initial hypodensity or loss of grey-white differentiation after 3-6hrs (grey becomes isodense to white esp cortical ribbon sign, loss of basal ganglia) due to reduced CBV, hence the earlier this occurs the worse the prognosis (profound perfusion defect). (radnotes.co.nz)
  • Symptoms
  • The National Institutes of Health recommend considering the evaluation of an underlying celiac disease in people with unexplained neurological symptoms, particularly peripheral neuropathy or ataxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • These intermediate breakdown products are particularly prone to affect the basal ganglia, causing many of the signs and symptoms of glutaric acidemia type 1. (wikipedia.org)
  • The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). (wikipedia.org)
  • Brain
  • The goal of treatment for moyamoya disease is reducing the risks of recurrent strokes by doing an arterial bypass or by forming a new blood supply to the affected parts of the brain. (naturalpedia.com)
  • The Illinois Brain Aneurysm Center offers the most comprehensive care from a highly experienced team dedicated to developing and implementing the best methods for treating this disease. (uic.edu)
  • A variety of conditions can cause brain injury, from external factors to diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • A neurological examination can to some extent assess the impact of neurological damage and disease on brain function in terms of behavior, memory or cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Excessive levels of their intermediate breakdown products (glutaric acid, glutaryl-CoA, 3-hydroxyglutaric acid, glutaconic acid) can accumulate and cause damage to the brain (and also other organs), but particularly the basal ganglia, which are regions that help regulate movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amnesia is a deficit in memory caused by brain damage, disease, or psychological trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • vascular diseases
  • This literature review outlines the lessons learned from studies demonstrating insomnia and OSA as risk factors for hypertension and vascular diseases to support the epidemiologic and physiologic evidence suggesting a similar increase in hypertension and vascular disease risk due to RLS. (springer.com)
  • abnormalities
  • Because of this, researchers think that the disease may be a result of inherited genetic abnormalities. (naturalpedia.com)
  • Because it tends to run in families, researchers think that Moyamoya disease is the result of inherited genetic abnormalities. (uic.edu)
  • infection
  • The disease is usually latent, occurring up to 6 months after the acute infection, but may occasionally be the presenting symptom of rheumatic fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • A major manifestation of acute rheumatic fever, Sydenham's chorea is a result of an autoimmune response that occurs following infection by group A β-hemolytic streptococci that destroys cells in the corpus striatum of the basal ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moyamoya
  • The cause of moyamoya disease is unclear. (naturalpedia.com)
  • However, about 10 percent of people suffering from Moyamoya disease have a close relative who is also affected. (naturalpedia.com)
  • There is no information on what foods or nutrients prevent moyamoya disease. (naturalpedia.com)
  • Moyamoya disease can be treated with surgery, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and speech therapy. (naturalpedia.com)
  • Moyamoya disease was first described in Japan in the 1960's and it has since been found in individuals in the United States, Europe, Australia, and Africa. (uic.edu)
  • examination
  • Linear measures of global and temporal atrophy and Mini-Mental State Examination scores were used to adjust for AD pathology and disease severity in logistic regression models with the BPSD items delusions, hallucinations, agitation, depression, anxiety, apathy and irritability. (karger.com)
  • accident
  • Marie described the case of a Frenchman who started speaking in an Alsatian accent after suffering from a cerebrovascular accident which caused right hemiplegia. (wikipedia.org)
  • type
  • Speaking in a foreign accent is only one type of dysprosody, as the disease can also manifest itself in other ways, such as changes in pitch, volume, and rhythm of speech. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Essentially, people diagnosed with the disease can comprehend language and vocalize what they intend to say, however, they are not able to control the way in which the words come out of their mouths. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Restless legs syndrome, or Willis-Ekbom Disease (RLS/WED), is a common sensorimotor disorder with a circadian rhythmicity defined by an uncontrollable urge to move the legs that worsens during periods of inactivity or at rest in the evening, often resulting in sleep disruptions. (springer.com)