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  • influenza
  • Illustration of an influenza virus attaching to a cell membrane: Professor Louise Ryan is working with CSIRO to distinguish cases of the flu from other disease events. (terradaily.com)
  • Using this technique, they were able to predict influenza outbreaks in the U.S., Poland, Japan and Thailand, the spread of dengue in Brazil, and a spike in the number of tuberculosis cases in Thailand. (ibtimes.com)
  • In the event of an influenza pandemic or other communicable disease situation, [Name of Company] may implement these social distancing guidelines to minimize the spread of the influenza and other communicable diseases among the staff. (shrm.org)
  • Country-specific totals of cases and deaths kept current by the WHO may be viewed by clicking through the links provided at http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/country/en/ Epidemic and Pandemic Alert and Response (EPR) Confirmed Human Cases of Avian Influenza A(H5N1) A strain of H5N1 killed chickens in 1959 in Scotland and turkeys in 1991 in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • The intermittent spread to humans will continue, and the virus will continue to evolve.Map As of the July 25, 2008 FAO Avian Influenza Disease Emergency Situation Update, H5N1 pathogenicity is continuing to gradually rise in endemic areas but the avian influenza disease situation in farmed birds is being held in check by vaccination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Influenza A (H1N1) virus is the subtype of influenza A virus that was the most common cause of human influenza (flu) in 2009, and is associated with the 1918 outbreak known as the Spanish Flu. (wikipedia.org)
  • Swine influenza (swine flu or pig flu) is a respiratory disease that occurs in pigs that is caused by the Influenza A virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Spanish flu, also known as la grippe, La Gripe Española, or La Pesadilla, was an unusually severe and deadly strain of swine influenza, a viral infectious disease, that killed some 50 to 100 million people worldwide over about a year in 1918 and 1919. (wikipedia.org)
  • dengue fever
  • BRAZZAVILLE, Republic of the Congo, June 20 (UPI) -- Health officials in the Congo have reported an outbreak of Chikungunya, a mosquito-borne disease similar to dengue fever, in parts of the capital Brazzaville. (upi.com)
  • No deaths have been reported in the outbreak, initially thought to be malaria, but health authorities have warned of elevated risks of an outbreak of dengue fever, an infection transmitted by mosquito vectors. (upi.com)
  • By the late 1990s, dengue was the most important mosquito-borne disease affecting humans after malaria, with around 40 million cases of dengue fever and several hundred thousand cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Significant outbreaks of dengue fever tend to occur every five or six months. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • In early 2016, we knew about outbreaks of C. auris infections on multiple continents, but we were not sure whether C. auris was in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • The West African Ebola virus epidemic (2013-2016) was the most widespread outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in history-causing major loss of life and socioeconomic disruption in the region, mainly in the countries of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 8 May 2016[update], the World Health Organization (WHO) and respective governments reported a total of 28,616 suspected cases and 11,310 deaths (39.5%), though the WHO believes that this substantially understates the magnitude of the outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • On 29 March 2016, the WHO terminated the Public Health Emergency of International Concern status of the outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • In December 2016, the WHO announced that a two-year trial of the rVSV-ZEBOV vaccine appeared to offer protection from the strain of Ebola responsible for the West Africa outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ebola had been discovered to be endemic to West Africa decades prior to the 2013-2016 outbreak, but this was not well understood in West Africa or by the international health community. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 2013-2016 outbreak was the first anywhere in the world to reach epidemic proportions. (wikipedia.org)
  • EPIDEMICS
  • Because the feds are now dumping illegals elsewhere, these outbreaks are spreading beyond the immediate area of Texas (bad as that is) and spreading potential epidemics. (americanthinker.com)
  • The first recognized dengue epidemics occurred almost simultaneously in Asia, Africa, and North America in the 1780s, shortly after the identification and naming of the disease in 1779. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • An outbreak of plague in Madagascar began in August 2017 and expanded rapidly, with about two-thirds of cases transmitted person-to-person as pneumonic plague, the most dangerous form of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak began in August 2017 with the death from pneumonic plague of a 31-year-old man who had been traveling in a crowded minibus toward the capital city of Antananarivo in the central highlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • H5N1
  • The first report, in the current wave of HPAI A(H5N1) outbreaks, was of an outbreak that began December 10, 2003 in the Republic of Korea and continued for fourteen weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eleven outbreaks of H5N1 were reported worldwide in June 2008 in five countries (China, Egypt, Indonesia, Pakistan and Vietnam) compared to 65 outbreaks in June 2006 and 55 in June 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • A highly pathogenic strain of H5N1 caused flu outbreaks with significant spread to numerous farms, resulting in great economic losses in 1959 in Scotland in chickens and in 1991 in England in turkeys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zika
  • French Polynesia In October 2013, an independent outbreak of the Zika virus occurred in the Society, Marquesas and Tuamotu Islands of French Polynesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak abated in October 2014, with 8,723 suspected cases of Zika reported. (wikipedia.org)
  • French Polynesia On 20 March, researchers discover that two mothers and their newborns test positive for Zika, perinatal transmission confirmed by polymerase chain reaction performed on serum collected within four days of birth during the outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Japan In December 2013, a Japanese tourist returning to Japan was diagnosed with Zika virus infection by the National Institute of Infectious Diseases after visiting the French Polynesian island of Bora Bora, becoming the first imported case of Zika fever in Japan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cook Islands In February 2014, an outbreak of Zika started in the Cook Islands. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak ended on 29 May, with 50 confirmed and 932 suspected cases of Zika virus infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Solomon Islands An outbreak of Zika begins on the Solomon Islands, with 302 cases reported by 3 May. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wikipedia
  • Wikipedia page views could, in the future, become an important tool in predicting disease outbreaks, according to the findings of a new study published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology. (ibtimes.com)
  • The research, carried out by a group of data scientists from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, argued that Wikipedia traffic data could also be used to estimate the current rates of disease outbreaks across the world. (ibtimes.com)
  • The team of scientists tracked the progress of seven diseases across 11 countries -- using language as an approximate measure for people's locations -- between 2010 and 2013, and compared page views on Wikipedia articles about those diseases with data obtained from health ministries. (ibtimes.com)
  • The researchers claimed that Wikipedia is the best bet to create an Internet-based model to predict outbreaks because data on Wikipedia page views are publicly available. (ibtimes.com)
  • However, the Wikipedia-based model was not successful in predicting the spread of slow-progressing diseases like HIV/AIDS, according to the paper. (ibtimes.com)
  • World Health Organ
  • The World Health Organization warned that there was a high risk the disease could spread to nine other countries in Africa and the Indian Ocean (Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, South Africa, Seychelles, Comoros, Reunion, and Mauritius) because of frequent trade and travel with Madagascar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flag icons denote the first announcements of confirmed cases by the respective nation-states, their first deaths (and other events such as their first reported cases of microcephaly and major public health announcements), and relevant sessions and announcements of the World Health Organization (WHO), and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), as well as relevant virological, epidemiological, and entomological studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • epidemic
  • Epidemic - when this disease is found to infect a significantly larger number of people at the same time than is common at that time, and among that population, and may spread through one or several communities. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is both epizootic (an epidemic in non-humans) and panzootic (a disease affecting animals of many species especially over a wide area). (wikipedia.org)
  • illness
  • The purpose of investigating and reporting these cases was to obtain information regarding the role of food, milk, and water in outbreaks of intestinal illness as the basis for public health action. (cdc.gov)
  • Beginning in 1925, the Public Health Service published summaries of outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness attributed to milk (1). (cdc.gov)
  • ebola
  • For issues like Ebola, I don't think people at the beginning of the outbreak in West Africa would have (been searching for it), because they wouldn't have had it (Ebola) before. (ibtimes.com)
  • The outbreak left about 17,000 survivors of the disease, many of whom report post-recovery symptoms termed post-Ebola syndrome, often severe enough to require medical care for months or even years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ebola virus disease (commonly known as "Ebola") was first described in 1976 in two simultaneous outbreaks in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and what is now South Sudan. (wikipedia.org)
  • pandemic
  • Japan has inoculated 6,000 health care workers with a pre-pandemic vaccine, and is planning how to proceed with widespread vaccinations, particularly workers who would provide utilities during an outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Legionella
  • Legionella isolation can be conducted using the method developed by the US Center for Disease Control using buffered charcoal yeast extract agar with antibiotics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Salmonella
  • For example, if Health Canada was trying to determine the cause of a Salmonella outbreak in humans, the database would specify any related outbreaks in farm or pet animals and related contaminated food products. (uoguelph.ca)
  • initially
  • The outbreak was initially recognized on 11 September by local authorities and confirmed by the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially called novel coronavirus 2012 or simply novel coronavirus, it was first reported in 2012 after genome sequencing of a virus isolated from sputum samples from a person who fell ill in a 2012 outbreak of a new flu. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially, the disease appears as small purple or red brown flecks with a faint chlorotic halo on the leaf surface, which coalesce to form bright yellow pustules. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • and parasites, 2% of outbreaks and 5% of cases. (cdc.gov)
  • Based on this comparison, the researchers found that, in eight out of 14 cases, there was a clear increase in page views nearly a month before an official declaration of an outbreak. (ibtimes.com)
  • To combat disease outbreaks, public health officials often use painstaking fieldwork to try to stay one step ahead of the infectious bugs, linking patients' symptoms to a source of infection to quickly identify the common culprit in related cases. (eurekalert.org)
  • According to the OIE, several cases of Newcastle disease have been recorded in different districts with high morbidity and mortality. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • According to the team, the newly released software program will enable health authorities at the site of an infectious disease outbreak quickly analyse data, speeding the detection of new cases and the implementation of effective interventions. (thaindian.com)
  • The disease is reported to begin as a skin rash, and in numerous cases appears to have led to the death of the sufferers through organ failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Four deaths were registered in the official adverse event register, and while in only two cases a clear causal link was considered to be in place, two other cases were diagnosed with a disease which in scientific peer-reviewed articles (case descriptions) have been mistakenly first made, and afterward have been noticed to be disseminated BCG infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak appeared to peak in Mid-October with the number of new cases declining. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak expanded rapidly, transmitted person-to-person in the pneumonic form of the disease, which accounted for more than 60 percent of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Authorities called the outbreak "quite worrisome" because the number of cases per day was growing rapidly, and many cases were in urban areas where there are more opportunities for contact between people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nearby Guadeloupe and Martinique, in the French Caribbean, were affected as well: over 40000 clinical cases in each island required medical assistance (the outbreak peaked in August 2010 and was practically over by October). (wikipedia.org)
  • Two linked cases of a rare infectious disease may be sufficient to constitute an outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak peaked in April, with the number of confirmed cases reaching 1,400 by 17 September. (wikipedia.org)
  • Small outbreaks occurred in Nigeria and Mali, and isolated cases were recorded in Senegal, the United Kingdom and Sardinia. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1990s
  • While avian flu has been a prominent public health issue since the 1990s, ongoing outbreaks have never been so widely spread around the world - something infectious disease experts put down to greater resilience of strains currently circulating, rather than improved detection or reporting. (perelandra-ltd.com)
  • pinpoint
  • Children's Hospital Boston, said in a press release, said it can pinpoint outbreaks reported in the vicinity of a user and let them search for additional information by location or disease. (newsmax.com)
  • University of Guelph researchers have received a $375,000 Health Canada grant to develop a database program to help pinpoint causes of disease outbreaks. (uoguelph.ca)
  • authorities
  • The likelihood of an outbreak's coming to the attention of health authorities varies considerably from one locale to another and depends largely upon consumer awareness, physician interest, and disease surveillance activities of state and local health and environmental agencies. (cdc.gov)
  • BOTSWANA - The veterinary authorities in Botswana have reported five fresh outbreaks of Newcastle disease in Central Serowe, Kgatleng, South-east Ramotswa, Southern Kanye and Kweneng. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • viral
  • Agents are worrying about a viral outbreak. (americanthinker.com)
  • The country's Director General of Health, Alexis Elira Dokekias, said more than 900 people have been confirmed infected with the viral disease, AfricaNews reported Monday. (upi.com)
  • investigations
  • Since 1966, the quality of investigative reports has improved greatly, with more active participation by state and federal epidemiologists in outbreak investigations. (cdc.gov)
  • spread
  • THE Department of Homeland Security confirmed last week that the highly contagious foot-and-mouth virus had briefly spread within the Plum Island Animal Disease Center in two previously undisclosed incidents earlier this summer. (nytimes.com)
  • The program uses this information to statistically determine the probability that people contracted the disease from each other, a driving factor in the spread of infections. (thaindian.com)
  • By the 8th November, deaths had risen to 165 with infections totalling over 2000, however the rate of spread had slowed, raising hope that the outbreak was starting to come under control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Verify the diagnosis related to the outbreak Create a case definition to define who/what is included as a case Map the spread of the outbreak using Information technology as diagnosis is reported to insurance Develop a hypothesis (What appears to be causing the outbreak? (wikipedia.org)
  • later, the disease spread to neighboring Liberia and Sierra Leone, with minor outbreaks occurring elsewhere. (wikipedia.org)
  • officials
  • This paper addresses an important question - just how much information about an outbreak can we reliably derive from genomic data alone - and gives public health officials a new tool for their detective kits," according to authors Jennifer Gardy, Caroline Colijn, and Xavier Didelot. (eurekalert.org)
  • Following the Morrisania outbreak, city officials stated that they would be pursuing new regulations for cooling towers. (wikipedia.org)
  • detection
  • Serological evidence indicates additional human exposure and/or presence in some mosquito species between 1951 and 1981 in parts of Africa (Uganda and Tanzania having the first detection of antibody in humans, in 1952, followed by isolation of the virus from a young girl in Nigeria in 1954 during an outbreak of jaundice, and experimental infection in a human volunteer in 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • viruses
  • Many people in outbreaks are not virally tested, therefore their infections may also be due to chikungunya, a coinfection of both, or even other similar viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • hypothesis
  • Study hypotheses (collect data and perform analysis) Refine hypothesis and carry out further study Develop and implement control and prevention systems Release findings to greater communities The order of the above steps and relative amount of effort and resources used in each varies from outbreak to outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • HealthMap
  • We hope individuals will find the new app to be a useful source of outbreak information -- locally, nationally, and globally," said HealthMap co-founder John Brownstein, an assistant professor in the Children's Hospital Informatics Program. (newsmax.com)
  • The application also allows users to submit their own reports of outbreaks or photos to the HealthMap team. (newsmax.com)
  • As part of this work, he has built and maintains several patient facing public health systems, including HealthMap, an internet-based global infectious disease intelligence system. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • To cause disease, a microbe must enter a person's body. (illinois.gov)
  • While the main source of the outbreaks remains inconclusive, contact with wild species has been determined as the primary cause of the outbreaks. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • The cause of the outbreak was traced back to the Opera House Hotel on July 10, 2015 and was declared as over as of August 20. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the Center for Disease Control responded rapidly, as did the Pennsylvania Health Department, it wasn't until nearly a year later that Joseph McDade made the discovery that a previously identified bacterium was the cause of the outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cause of the outbreak is still unknown and no exposure to pigs was identified. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Common source - All victims acquire the infection from the same source (e.g. a contaminated water supply).Continuous source - Common source outbreak where the exposure occurs over multiple incubation periods Point source - Common source outbreak where the exposure occurs in less than one incubation period Propagated - Transmission occurs from person to person. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • Follow those guidelines and use the following focus: "Strengthening my flocks for potential exposure to bird flu and for dealing with the resulting disease. (perelandra-ltd.com)
  • laboratory
  • Also, a single case of chemical poisoning constitutes an outbreak if laboratory studies indicate that the water has been contaminated by the chemical. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, the Health Effects Research Laboratory of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) contacts all state water-supply agencies annually to obtain information about waterborne disease outbreaks. (cdc.gov)
  • Traditional disease surveillance techniques involve collecting data from laboratory tests and tracking the number of visits to health care facilities. (ibtimes.com)
  • Time is key in these events -- people can become very ill or die during disease outbreaks -- so speedy recognition and evaluation are critical," said Beverly McEwen, one of the project co-ordinators from the University's Animal Health Laboratory. (uoguelph.ca)
  • In outbreaks identified through notifiable disease surveillance, reports are often linked to laboratory results and verifying the diagnosis is straight forward. (wikipedia.org)
  • appears
  • It appears that many species are under an immense amount of stress, allowing opportunistic diseases to take hold," Rob Mies, executive director of the Organization for Bat Conservation, told Discovery News . (motherjones.com)
  • reports
  • A recent article in Discovery News reports that some experts have come to suspect that the diseases spurring these population declines may be linked. (motherjones.com)
  • The term "Spanish" flu was coined because Spain was at the time the only European country where the press were printing reports of the outbreak, which had killed thousands in the armies fighting World War I. Other countries suppressed the news in order to protect morale. (wikipedia.org)
  • cholera outbreak
  • At least 65 people are confirmed to have died in a nearly five-month-old cholera outbreak in Kenya, with infections also continuing to rise in the capital Nairobi, health officials said Wednesday…" (5/20). (kff.org)
  • One of the first examples of geographic methods being used for purposes other than to describe and theorize the physical properties of the earth is John Snow's map of the 1854 Broad Street cholera outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centers
  • In addition to administering Medicare and Medicaid, which together provide health insurance to one in four Americans, HHS also oversees the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, and the Centers for Disease Control. (wheelingjesuituniversity.com)
  • Address correspondence to Claire Y.-H. Huang, Arbovirus Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 3156 Rampart Rd., Fort Collins, CO 80521. (ajtmh.org)
  • To investigate characteristics of hepatitis E cases in the United States, we tested samples from persons seronegative for acute hepatitis A and B whose clinical specimens were referred to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during June 2005-March 2012 for hepatitis E virus (HEV) testing. (cdc.gov)
  • In December 2006, Taco Bell restaurants in four Northeastern states emerged as a common link among 71 sickened people across five states, 52 of whom were ultimately confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control to have tested positive the same E. coli strain. (wikipedia.org)
  • O157
  • Moreover, a large outbreak associated with E. coli O157:H45 EPEC was reported in Japan in 1998. (uzh.ch)
  • Cattle seem also to be a reservoir of O157:H45 EPEC strains, which are described in association with human diseases. (uzh.ch)
  • infectious disease
  • Jim Wilson , MD, a pediatrician and infectious disease expert with AscelBio and a SERMO correspondent, relating some of the breaking news to his peers comments on the expanded Ebola threat, "In this part of Africa , what we've noticed on satellite imagery is there's been a pattern of deforestation and encroachment of human beings on ecosystems that up until now has been fairly isolated. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever remains a serious and potentially life-threatening infectious disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • coli
  • Tainted green onions may have proven a ready culprit in part because of their involvement in at least one widely reported prior outbreak of E. coli. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though green onions were proven to not be the source of Taco Bell's E. coli outbreak, Taco Bell has no plans to put them back on the menu. (wikipedia.org)
  • Later in December 2006, Iowa and Minnesota health officials investigated an E. coli outbreak that was traced to foods served at Taco John's restaurants in Cedar Falls, Iowa and Albert Lea and Austin, Minnesota. (wikipedia.org)
  • On December 18, 2006, the Minnesota Department of Health reported that 37 probable E. coli cases had been reported in connection with the Taco John's E. coli outbreak, nine people were confirmed ill with E. coli, eight people were hospitalized, and one person had developed hemolytic-uremic syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Taco John's E. coli outbreak was traced to contaminated lettuce sold in foods at Taco John's restaurants that were supplied by a Minneapolis lettuce supplier. (wikipedia.org)
  • In response to the Taco John's E. coli outbreak, Taco John's agreed to reimburse ill individuals for medical expenses, and hired a new fresh produce supplier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Taco John's president and CEO Paul Fisherkeller stated in an open letter that their restaurant food was safe to eat in the wake of the E. coli outbreak that closed three of their restaurants in Iowa and Minnesota. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Symptoms and treatment guidelines, travel advisory, and daily outbreak updates. (dmoztools.net)
  • A comprehensive guide to SARS, with articles by a team of science journalists at the Australian Broadcasting Corp. It details what is known about the outbreak, the virus, the ensuing panic and known symptoms and treatments. (dmoztools.net)
  • Initial signs and symptoms of the disease include sudden onset of fever, headache, and muscle pain, followed by development of rash. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initial symptoms: Fever Nausea Emesis (vomiting) Severe headache Muscle pain Lack of appetite Parotitis in some cases (somewhat rare) Later signs and symptoms: Maculopapular rash Petechial rash Abdominal pain Joint pain Conjunctivitis Forgetfulness The classic triad of findings for this disease are fever, rash, and history of tick bite. (wikipedia.org)
  • genuine
  • I]n recent years genuine progress has been made in pushing back against this disease, with an estimated 4.3 million lives saved from malaria since 2001, thanks to a colossal global push. (kff.org)
  • underfunded health
  • Jon Gunnarsson of Médecins Sans Frontières], who works with refugees in Jordan, says that non-communicable diseases (NCDs) represent one of the most urgent yet underfunded health crises facing Syrian refugees displaced by the country's civil war. (kff.org)
  • initial
  • The initial outbreak occurred in September 2006 and its probable origin was an Angus cattle ranch that had leased land to spinach grower (growing under organic practices). (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • The places where the disease continues to be endemic, where people don't have preventative measures such as nets or treatment, are the hardest to reach. (kff.org)
  • In one outbreak at an international scout jamboree in the Netherlands, each person with gastroenteritis infected an average of 14 people before increased hygiene measures were put in place. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 21 April 2012[update], the disease was reported to have affected 170 people, and killed 19. (wikipedia.org)
  • virus
  • A mosquito sample collected in Glendale tested positive for West Nile virus, making it the first sign of the disease in the city this year. (glendalenewspress.com)
  • ON THE AGENDA The following items will be discussed at tonight's Crescenta Valley Town Council meeting: Following a July outbreak of West Nile Virus in La Crescenta, the council will officially notify the public about the mosquito-borne disease. (glendalenewspress.com)
  • You're going to see more outbreaks in the future where the virus has made its way into a highly urbanized environment plus or minus the presence of an international airport, so this is not the last time you're going to see this. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Camelpox is a disease of camels caused by a virus of the family Poxviridae, subfamily Chordopoxvirinae, and the genus Orthopoxvirus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subsequent research failed to confirm this hypothesis, with a group of experts in Britain reviewing a number of peer-reviewed studies in 1998 and concluding that the measles virus did not cause Crohn's disease, and that the MMR vaccine did not either. (wikipedia.org)
  • lethal
  • And the fear is that if global funding and attention turns to something else there will be a lethal resurgence of the disease…" (Leach, 5/20). (kff.org)
  • Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), also known as blue disease, is the most lethal and most frequently reported rickettsial illness in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • illness
  • The disease is usually self-limiting, and severe illness is rare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wakefield's study and his claim that the MMR vaccine might cause autism led to a decline in vaccination rates in the United States, United Kingdom and Ireland and a corresponding rise in measles and mumps, resulting in serious illness and deaths, and his continued claims that the vaccine is harmful have contributed to a climate of distrust of all vaccines and the reemergence of other previously controlled diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • fatal
  • At the end of four years, it was concluded that the disease was not encephalitis as so far believed but a fatal multi-system disease affecting liver, muscle and brain called, "acute hepatomyoencephalopathy (HME) syndrome" induced by a phytotoxin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease can be difficult to diagnose in the early stages, and without prompt and appropriate treatment it can be fatal. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • Global food requirement is increasing alarmingly and is further compounded by the challenges of climate change, stagnant wheat yields in many countries, outbreaks of new pathogen/pest races, and invasive weed species that delay progress and pose serious threats to world food security. (krishisewa.com)
  • countries
  • A comprehensive range of information is available from: Immediate notifications and follow-up reports submitted by Member Countries in response to exceptional disease events occurring in these countries as well as follow-up reports about these events, Six-monthly reports describing the OIE-listed disease situations in each country Annual reports providing further background information on animal health, on laboratory and vaccine production facilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Collected references on the disease and related topics, including general press, medical journals, and public health departments of affected countries. (dmoztools.net)
  • syndrome
  • South Korean health officials have confirmed the country's second case of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in a patient who nursed her infected husband before he was diagnosed with the disease after a trip to Bahrain…" (Cho, 5/20). (kff.org)
  • Acute hepatomyoencephalopathy (HME) syndrome is the name given to a multi-system disease affecting the liver, muscle and brain which is now known to be caused by phytotoxins. (wikipedia.org)
  • In many districts of western Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Odisha and Haryana, India, outbreaks of an acute "encephalopathy" syndrome, dubbed as a "mysterious disease", have been an annual feature for many years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vashishtha VM, Nayak NC, John TJ, Kumar A. Recurrent annual outbreaks of a hepatomyo-encephalopathy syndrome in children in Western Uttar Pradesh, India. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disappearance of a deadly disease acute hepatomyoencephalopathy syndrome from Saharanpur. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • Since then outbreaks have occurred at warm water fish hatcheries in NSW and Victoria. (wikipedia.org)
  • The source of waterborne outbreaks may include water from municipal supplies, wells, recreational lakes, swimming pools and ice machines. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • Available from: http://icmr.nic.in/ijmr/2009/july/0703.pdf Panwar RS, Kumar N. Cassia occidentalis toxicity causes recurrent outbreaks of brain disease in children in Saharanpur. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • Branham was considered an international expert on the strain of disease: due to her great contributions to the knowledge about it, Neisseria catarrhalis was renamed Branhamella caterrhalis in 1970, years after Branham's death. (wikipedia.org)
  • and two years later he published a paper in The Lancet proposing a link between the measles vaccine and Crohn's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • State
  • Between 1981 and 1996, the disease was reported from every state of the United States except for Hawaii, Vermont, Maine, and Alaska. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) is an intergovernmental organization coordinating, supporting and promoting animal disease control. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Information on the research program at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, US. (dmoztools.net)
  • Andrew Jeremy Wakefield (born 1957) is a British former gastroenterologist and medical researcher who was struck off the UK medical register for his fraudulent 1998 research paper and other misconduct in support of the now-discredited claim that there was a link between the administration of the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine, and the appearance of autism and bowel disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • In November 2011, another report in BMJ revealed original raw data indicating that, contrary to Wakefield's claims in The Lancet, children in his research did not have inflammatory bowel disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • international
  • The need to fight animal diseases at global level led to the creation of the Office International des Epizooties through the international Agreement signed on January 25, 1924. (wikipedia.org)
  • parts
  • Tuberculosis (TB) disease rates in some parts of London are as high as in Sub-Saharan Africa, and drug-resistant strains are becoming increasingly common. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • It is now recognized that the disease is broadly distributed throughout the contiguous United States and occurs as far north as Canada and as far south as Central America and parts of South America. (wikipedia.org)
  • recent
  • GLENDALE - The recent rise in foreclosed homes in Glendale and Burbank due to the recession has led to an increase in abandoned swimming pools, creating prime breeding grounds for disease-carrying mosquitoes and potential drowning hazards, authorities said. (glendalenewspress.com)
  • Early
  • Spotted fever can be very difficult to diagnose in its early stages, and even experienced doctors who are familiar with the disease find it hard to detect. (wikipedia.org)
  • The early clinical presentation of Rocky Mountain spotted fever is nonspecific and may resemble a variety of other infectious and non-infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • The disease is reported to begin as a skin rash, and in numerous cases appears to have led to the death of the sufferers through organ failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • public
  • A crow that dropped out of the sky into the driveway of Crescenta Valley Town Council Mayor Grace Andrus' home the evening of June 26 was infected with the disease, according to the Los Angeles County Public Health Department. (glendalenewspress.com)