• infectious disease
  • As people are equipped with more knowledge and awareness of infectious disease, the hope is that they will become more involved and proactive about public health," he said. (newsmax.com)
  • In our interconnected world we are all vulnerable" when countries lack the will or the ability to detect and contain infectious-disease outbreaks, Laura Holgate, senior director for Weapons of Mass Destruction Terrorism and Threat Reduction at the U.S. National Security Council, told reporters ahead of the Thursday meeting. (voanews.com)
  • While avian flu has been a prominent public health issue since the 1990s, ongoing outbreaks have never been so widely spread around the world - something infectious disease experts put down to greater resilience of strains currently circulating, rather than improved detection or reporting. (perelandra-ltd.com)
  • Coping with Stress During Infectious Disease Outbreaks This fact sheet provides tips for coping with stress during an infectious. (samhsa.gov)
  • Taking Care of Your Behavioral Health: Tips for Social Distancing, Quarantine, and Isolation During an Infectious Disease Outbreak (Spanish Version) Esta hoja de consejos explica algunas de las medidas de precauciĆ³n que pueden. (samhsa.gov)
  • Legionnaire's is a potentially fatal infectious disease caused by gram negative, aerobic bacteria belonging to the genus Legionella. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two linked cases of a rare infectious disease may be sufficient to constitute an outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • As part of this work, he has built and maintains several patient facing public health systems, including HealthMap, an internet-based global infectious disease intelligence system. (wikipedia.org)
  • influenza
  • Illustration of an influenza virus attaching to a cell membrane: Professor Louise Ryan is working with CSIRO to distinguish cases of the flu from other disease events. (terradaily.com)
  • Using this technique, they were able to predict influenza outbreaks in the U.S., Poland, Japan and Thailand, the spread of dengue in Brazil, and a spike in the number of tuberculosis cases in Thailand. (ibtimes.com)
  • Another goal is to detect threats early, such as by strengthening and linking disease-monitoring systems of individual countries, developing real-time electronic reporting systems, and promoting faster sharing of biological samples, such as throat swabs and blood samples from people with a new form of influenza. (voanews.com)
  • They included novel diseases, such as new strains of influenza and outbreaks of known threats such as Ebola. (voanews.com)
  • In the event of an influenza pandemic or other communicable disease situation, [Name of Company] may implement these social distancing guidelines to minimize the spread of the influenza and other communicable diseases among the staff. (shrm.org)
  • Country-specific totals of cases and deaths kept current by the WHO may be viewed by clicking through the links provided at http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/country/en/ Epidemic and Pandemic Alert and Response (EPR) Confirmed Human Cases of Avian Influenza A(H5N1) A strain of H5N1 killed chickens in 1959 in Scotland and turkeys in 1991 in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • The intermittent spread to humans will continue, and the virus will continue to evolve.Map As of the July 25, 2008 FAO Avian Influenza Disease Emergency Situation Update, H5N1 pathogenicity is continuing to gradually rise in endemic areas but the avian influenza disease situation in farmed birds is being held in check by vaccination. (wikipedia.org)
  • EPIDEMICS
  • The first recognized dengue epidemics occurred almost simultaneously in Asia, Africa, and North America in the 1780s, shortly after the identification and naming of the disease in 1779. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • An outbreak of plague in Madagascar began in August 2017 and expanded rapidly, with about two-thirds of cases transmitted person-to-person as pneumonic plague, the most dangerous form of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak began in August 2017 with the death from pneumonic plague of a 31-year-old man who had been traveling in a crowded minibus toward the capital city of Antananarivo in the central highlands. (wikipedia.org)
  • H5N1
  • The first report, in the current wave of HPAI A(H5N1) outbreaks, was of an outbreak that began December 10, 2003 in the Republic of Korea and continued for fourteen weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eleven outbreaks of H5N1 were reported worldwide in June 2008 in five countries (China, Egypt, Indonesia, Pakistan and Vietnam) compared to 65 outbreaks in June 2006 and 55 in June 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • A highly pathogenic strain of H5N1 caused flu outbreaks with significant spread to numerous farms, resulting in great economic losses in 1959 in Scotland in chickens and in 1991 in England in turkeys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zika
  • French Polynesia In October 2013, an independent outbreak of the Zika virus occurred in the Society, Marquesas and Tuamotu Islands of French Polynesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak abated in October 2014, with 8,723 suspected cases of Zika reported. (wikipedia.org)
  • French Polynesia On 20 March, researchers discover that two mothers and their newborns test positive for Zika, perinatal transmission confirmed by polymerase chain reaction performed on serum collected within four days of birth during the outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • Japan In December 2013, a Japanese tourist returning to Japan was diagnosed with Zika virus infection by the National Institute of Infectious Diseases after visiting the French Polynesian island of Bora Bora, becoming the first imported case of Zika fever in Japan. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cook Islands In February 2014, an outbreak of Zika started in the Cook Islands. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak ended on 29 May, with 50 confirmed and 932 suspected cases of Zika virus infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Solomon Islands An outbreak of Zika begins on the Solomon Islands, with 302 cases reported by 3 May. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • In early 2016, we knew about outbreaks of C. auris infections on multiple continents, but we were not sure whether C. auris was in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Wikipedia
  • Wikipedia page views could, in the future, become an important tool in predicting disease outbreaks, according to the findings of a new study published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology. (ibtimes.com)
  • The research, carried out by a group of data scientists from the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, argued that Wikipedia traffic data could also be used to estimate the current rates of disease outbreaks across the world. (ibtimes.com)
  • The team of scientists tracked the progress of seven diseases across 11 countries -- using language as an approximate measure for people's locations -- between 2010 and 2013, and compared page views on Wikipedia articles about those diseases with data obtained from health ministries. (ibtimes.com)
  • The researchers claimed that Wikipedia is the best bet to create an Internet-based model to predict outbreaks because data on Wikipedia page views are publicly available. (ibtimes.com)
  • However, the Wikipedia-based model was not successful in predicting the spread of slow-progressing diseases like HIV/AIDS, according to the paper. (ibtimes.com)
  • Ebola
  • For issues like Ebola, I don't think people at the beginning of the outbreak in West Africa would have (been searching for it), because they wouldn't have had it (Ebola) before. (ibtimes.com)
  • illness
  • The purpose of investigating and reporting these cases was to obtain information regarding the role of food, milk, and water in outbreaks of intestinal illness as the basis for public health action. (cdc.gov)
  • Beginning in 1925, the Public Health Service published summaries of outbreaks of gastrointestinal illness attributed to milk (1). (cdc.gov)
  • In 1961, CDC -- then the Communicable Disease Center -- assumed responsibility for publishing reports concerning foodborne illness. (cdc.gov)
  • spread
  • Disease threats spread faster than ever before," and "outbreaks anywhere in the world are only a plane ride away" from everyplace else. (voanews.com)
  • Agriculture Ministry official Kim Dae-gyun revealed that the step was taken to contain the spread of the disease, adding that more than 2,000 animals will be slaughtered in a half kilometer radius from the site of the outbreak. (medindia.net)
  • By the 8th November, deaths had risen to 165 with infections totalling over 2000, however the rate of spread had slowed, raising hope that the outbreak was starting to come under control. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization warned that there was a high risk the disease could spread to nine other countries in Africa and the Indian Ocean (Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania, Mozambique, South Africa, Seychelles, Comoros, Reunion, and Mauritius) because of frequent trade and travel with Madagascar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Verify the diagnosis related to the outbreak Create a case definition to define who/what is included as a case Map the spread of the outbreak using Information technology as diagnosis is reported to insurance Develop a hypothesis (What appears to be causing the outbreak? (wikipedia.org)
  • Epidemic - when this disease is found to infect a significantly larger number of people at the same time than is common at that time, and among that population, and may spread through one or several communities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plague is also known to spread to the lungs and become the disease known as the pneumonic plague. (wikipedia.org)
  • pandemic
  • Japan has inoculated 6,000 health care workers with a pre-pandemic vaccine, and is planning how to proceed with widespread vaccinations, particularly workers who would provide utilities during an outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • illnesses
  • Meeting in Washington, D.C., the countries include several that have been Ground Zero for recent outbreaks of potentially fatal contagious illnesses such as H7N9 bird flu, which was detected in China a year ago, and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, which was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. (voanews.com)
  • Nurses have always played a vital role in the response to outbreaks of deadly illnesses. (uleth.ca)
  • Emergencies
  • The EWARS project is an initiative to strengthen disease early warning, alert and response in emergencies. (who.int)
  • EWARS tries to catch disease outbreaks early on to help contain them in emergencies by providing technical support, training and field-based tools to Ministries of Health and other partners. (who.int)
  • Weekly Bulletin on Outbreaks and Other Emergencies" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • Legionella
  • Legionella isolation can be conducted using the method developed by the US Center for Disease Control using buffered charcoal yeast extract agar with antibiotics. (wikipedia.org)
  • epidemic
  • It is both epizootic (an epidemic in non-humans) and panzootic (a disease affecting animals of many species especially over a wide area). (wikipedia.org)
  • contagious
  • Public health officials could use social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook to track contagious diseases, according to research published Tuesday. (ibtimes.com)
  • Wildlife health experts from the Wildlife Conservation Society have published evidence which supports the conclusion that Mongolian gazelles-one of the most populous large land mammals on the planet-are not a reservoir of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), a highly contagious viral disease that threatens both wildlife and livestock in Asia. (innovations-report.com)
  • Salmonella
  • For example, if Health Canada was trying to determine the cause of a Salmonella outbreak in humans, the database would specify any related outbreaks in farm or pet animals and related contaminated food products. (uoguelph.ca)
  • Africa
  • Serological evidence indicates additional human exposure and/or presence in some mosquito species between 1951 and 1981 in parts of Africa (Uganda and Tanzania having the first detection of antibody in humans, in 1952, followed by isolation of the virus from a young girl in Nigeria in 1954 during an outbreak of jaundice, and experimental infection in a human volunteer in 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 21st century, the disease is most common in Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1990s
  • By the late 1990s, dengue was the most important mosquito-borne disease affecting humans after malaria, with around 40 million cases of dengue fever and several hundred thousand cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever each year. (wikipedia.org)
  • epidemiological
  • EWARS also tracks disease alerts and publishes automated epidemiological bulletins each week to support data analysis and interpretation. (who.int)
  • Flag icons denote the first announcements of confirmed cases by the respective nation-states, their first deaths (and other events such as their first reported cases of microcephaly and major public health announcements), and relevant sessions and announcements of the World Health Organization (WHO), and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), as well as relevant virological, epidemiological, and entomological studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • pinpoint
  • Children's Hospital Boston, said in a press release, said it can pinpoint outbreaks reported in the vicinity of a user and let them search for additional information by location or disease. (newsmax.com)
  • University of Guelph researchers have received a $375,000 Health Canada grant to develop a database program to help pinpoint causes of disease outbreaks. (uoguelph.ca)
  • cases
  • and parasites, 2% of outbreaks and 5% of cases. (cdc.gov)
  • Based on this comparison, the researchers found that, in eight out of 14 cases, there was a clear increase in page views nearly a month before an official declaration of an outbreak. (ibtimes.com)
  • According to the OIE, several cases of Newcastle disease have been recorded in different districts with high morbidity and mortality. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • The disease is reported to begin as a skin rash, and in numerous cases appears to have led to the death of the sufferers through organ failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Four deaths were registered in the official adverse event register, and while in only two cases a clear causal link was considered to be in place, two other cases were diagnosed with a disease which in scientific peer-reviewed articles (case descriptions) have been mistakenly first made, and afterward have been noticed to be disseminated BCG infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak appeared to peak in Mid-October with the number of new cases declining. (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak expanded rapidly, transmitted person-to-person in the pneumonic form of the disease, which accounted for more than 60 percent of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Authorities called the outbreak "quite worrisome" because the number of cases per day was growing rapidly, and many cases were in urban areas where there are more opportunities for contact between people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nearby Guadeloupe and Martinique, in the French Caribbean, were affected as well: over 40000 clinical cases in each island required medical assistance (the outbreak peaked in August 2010 and was practically over by October). (wikipedia.org)
  • The outbreak peaked in April, with the number of confirmed cases reaching 1,400 by 17 September. (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • Also, a single case of chemical poisoning constitutes an outbreak if laboratory studies indicate that the water has been contaminated by the chemical. (cdc.gov)
  • In addition, the Health Effects Research Laboratory of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) contacts all state water-supply agencies annually to obtain information about waterborne disease outbreaks. (cdc.gov)
  • Traditional disease surveillance techniques involve collecting data from laboratory tests and tracking the number of visits to health care facilities. (ibtimes.com)
  • Time is key in these events -- people can become very ill or die during disease outbreaks -- so speedy recognition and evaluation are critical," said Beverly McEwen, one of the project co-ordinators from the University's Animal Health Laboratory. (uoguelph.ca)
  • Claude Surena, president of the Haitian Medical Association, told AFP that laboratory analysis on the outbreak in Saint Marc, about 100 kilometers (60 miles) north of the capital Port-Au-Prince, showed it was cholera. (medindia.net)
  • In outbreaks identified through notifiable disease surveillance, reports are often linked to laboratory results and verifying the diagnosis is straight forward. (wikipedia.org)
  • detection
  • WHO has rapidly expanded and strengthened disease detection and response in support of the Government of Nigeria's response to the humanitarian crisis in north eastern Nigeria, where 3.7 million people are in need of health assistance. (who.int)
  • By mid-October, as access to some hard-to-reach areas improved, the number of disease detection sites tripled. (who.int)
  • hypothesis
  • Study hypotheses (collect data and perform analysis) Refine hypothesis and carry out further study Develop and implement control and prevention systems Release findings to greater communities The order of the above steps and relative amount of effort and resources used in each varies from outbreak to outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • poor sanitation
  • But officials in the country fear that an outbreak in densely-populated tent cities that have poor sanitation and meagre medical facilities has the potential of unleashing a public health disaster. (medindia.net)
  • HealthMap
  • We hope individuals will find the new app to be a useful source of outbreak information -- locally, nationally, and globally," said HealthMap co-founder John Brownstein, an assistant professor in the Children's Hospital Informatics Program. (newsmax.com)
  • authorities
  • The likelihood of an outbreak's coming to the attention of health authorities varies considerably from one locale to another and depends largely upon consumer awareness, physician interest, and disease surveillance activities of state and local health and environmental agencies. (cdc.gov)
  • BOTSWANA - The veterinary authorities in Botswana have reported five fresh outbreaks of Newcastle disease in Central Serowe, Kgatleng, South-east Ramotswa, Southern Kanye and Kweneng. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • The outbreak was initially recognized on 11 September by local authorities and confirmed by the Institut Pasteur de Madagascar. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • While the main source of the outbreaks remains inconclusive, contact with wild species has been determined as the primary cause of the outbreaks. (thepoultrysite.com)
  • In a country where roughly one-third of the human population relies directly on livestock production for their subsistence, outbreaks of FMD cause severe disruption of the rural economy. (innovations-report.com)
  • There have been previous such outbreaks in yesteryears and although they have been controlled, the disease does cause high mortality. (medindia.net)
  • The cause of the outbreak was traced back to the Opera House Hotel on July 10, 2015 and was declared as over as of August 20. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the Center for Disease Control responded rapidly, as did the Pennsylvania Health Department, it wasn't until nearly a year later that Joseph McDade made the discovery that a previously identified bacterium was the cause of the outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • officials
  • Haitian officials said on Thursday that 135 people had died and 1,500 people were taken ill with the disease. (medindia.net)
  • More than 150 cows were slaughtered in the South Korean town of Pocheon as health officials scrambled to prevent another outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease after six cows were tested positive for the disease. (medindia.net)
  • Following the Morrisania outbreak, city officials stated that they would be pursuing new regulations for cooling towers. (wikipedia.org)
  • cholera
  • The WHO has revealed that UN health experts rushed to northern Haiti to help tackle a sudden outbreak of diarrhoeal disease that has left 150 dead, after some initial tests showed traces of cholera. (medindia.net)
  • The WHO said samples from hospitalized patients were being tested for different diarrheal-disease pathogens, including the cholera bacteria. (medindia.net)
  • initially
  • Initially called novel coronavirus 2012 or simply novel coronavirus, it was first reported in 2012 after genome sequencing of a virus isolated from sputum samples from a person who fell ill in a 2012 outbreak of a new flu. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially, the disease appears as small purple or red brown flecks with a faint chlorotic halo on the leaf surface, which coalesce to form bright yellow pustules. (wikipedia.org)
  • viruses
  • Many people in outbreaks are not virally tested, therefore their infections may also be due to chikungunya, a coinfection of both, or even other similar viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • appears
  • The study, titled "Serosurveillance for Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Mongolian Gazelles (Procapra gutturosa) and Livestock on the Eastern Steppe of Mongolia," appears in the January edition of the Journal of Wildlife Diseases. (innovations-report.com)
  • plague
  • Typically the annual plague outbreak peaks in December and runs until April. (wikipedia.org)
  • In very rare circumstances, as in the septicemic plague, the disease can be transmitted by direct contact with infected tissue or exposure to the cough of another human. (wikipedia.org)
  • Previous
  • The death toll of 124 by 20 October exceeded that of previous outbreaks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus over time there remain large numbers of susceptible people in affected populations despite previous outbreaks due to the four different serotypes of dengue virus and the presence of unexposed individuals from childbirth or immigration. (wikipedia.org)