• Congenital
  • Both the acquired as well as the congenital types of the disease can affect the facial nerve that extends from the brain to the face and passes through the inner and middle ear and leaves at the anterior tip of the mastoid bone, and then rises to the front of the ear and extends into the upper and lower face. (wikipedia.org)
  • Keratin-filled cysts that grow medial to the tympanic membrane are considered to be congenital if they fulfill the following criteria (levenson's criteria): mass medial to the tympanic membrane normal tympanic membrane no previous history of ear discharge, perforation or ear surgery Congenital cholesteatomas occur at three important sites: the middle ear, the Petrous apex, and the cerebropontine angle. (wikipedia.org)
  • A congenital form of the disease can also affect fetuses in the womb. (wikipedia.org)
  • CLINICAL
  • Studies have suggested that telemonitoring (Tm) can deliver clinical benefits to patients living with chronic conditions including COPD. (isrctn.com)
  • Uniquely, patients can be transferred between these levels (both up and down) according to Tm results and clinical discretion. (isrctn.com)
  • Furthermore, all patients will be treated according to the clinical discretion of their primary care doctors, specialist nurses and hospital specialists. (isrctn.com)
  • To address the question of feasibility of a CMR approach to managing patients at intermediate risk for ACS, we propose a randomized clinical trial of 120 patients at intermediate risk of ACS that present to the ED of Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (WFUBMC) for evaluation of chest pain. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The HEART pathway, which combines a clinical decision rule, the HEART score, and two serial troponin measurements, is a recently developed care pathway designed to identify chest pain patients for early discharge without objective testing. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Methods: Participants (n=282) at risk for ACS will be recruited into a clinical trial from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center (WFBMC) ED. Patients will be equally randomized to HEART Pathway or Usual Care. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 17, 18 They arise more commonly in middle and late phases of the clinical process and correlate with disease severity. (bmj.com)
  • Responding to this inconsistency, an industry trade association, the Care Continuum Alliance, convened industry leaders to develop consensus guidelines for measuring clinical and financial outcomes in disease management, wellness and other population-based programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The patient may commonly also have clinical signs of conductive hearing loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adherence management (AdM) was coined by Robert (Bob) E. Wright in 2012 to describe a technology (i.e., science embedded in applications and methods) for improving both patient behavior and achieving desired clinical results throughout the clinical course. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most detailed study on the frequency, onset, and duration of MVD clinical signs and symptoms was performed during the 1998-2000 mixed MARV/RAVV disease outbreak. (wikipedia.org)
  • COPD
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a common cause of illness and death, with sufferers being extensive users of the healthcare system. (isrctn.com)
  • The study aims to recruit 200 patients over the age of 18 who have been discharged from any of the four district general hospitals in the Hywel Dda University Health Board in Wales (Bronglais, Glangwili, Prince Philip and Withybush) following admission for an acute exacerbation (worsening) of COPD (AECOPD). (isrctn.com)
  • In an era of precision medicine, it seems regressive that we do not use stratified approaches to direct treatment of oral corticosteroids during an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (mdpi.com)
  • This is despite evidence suggesting that 40% of COPD patients have eosinophilic inflammation and this is an indicator of corticosteroid response. (mdpi.com)
  • Nurses
  • Nurses are on the front lines 24 hours a day in treating our patients, and it is their skill, their knowledge, and their passion for healing that makes one of the critical differences in caring for our patients. (emory.edu)
  • Hypothesis
  • We tested this hypothesis in 400 moderately to severely affected AD patients who were phenotyped for the presence of aggressive or agitated behaviour during the month prior to interview using the Neuropsychiatric Inventory with Caregiver Distress. (bmj.com)
  • outbreak
  • Infection control addresses factors related to the spread of infections within the healthcare setting (whether patient-to-patient, from patients to staff and from staff to patients, or among-staff), including prevention (via hand hygiene/hand washing, cleaning/disinfection/sterilization, vaccination, surveillance), monitoring/investigation of demonstrated or suspected spread of infection within a particular health-care setting (surveillance and outbreak investigation), and management (interruption of outbreaks). (wikipedia.org)
  • A second outbreak of Minamata disease occurred in Niigata Prefecture in 1965. (wikipedia.org)
  • facial
  • However, there are really only two main distinctions to be made in parotidectomies: The specific nerve(s) to be dissected or not dissected The amount of gland excised It is important to note that the specific surgery chosen is based on preservation of the facial nerve in order to avoid significant morbidities (diseases). (wikipedia.org)
  • syndrome
  • House eventually fools the patient into believing he has an imaginary disease (Ortolli syndrome) and discharges him after giving him mints as a "treatment" for his illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Delirium must by definition be caused by an organic process, i.e., a physically identifiable structural, functional, or chemical problem in the brain (see organic brain syndrome), and thus, fluctuations of mentation due to changes in purely psychiatric processes or diseases, such as sudden psychosis from schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, are (by definition) not termed delirium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Minamata disease (Japanese: 水俣病, Hepburn: Minamata-byō), sometimes referred to as Chisso-Minamata disease (チッソ水俣病, Chisso-Minamata-byō), is a neurological syndrome caused by severe mercury poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • public health threat
  • In coordination with the CDC and Georgia Department of Public Health, the patient was determined to be free of virus and to pose no public health threat. (emory.edu)
  • The Emory medical team has maintained its comprehensive safety procedures throughout the treatment process and is confident that the discharge of this patient poses no public health threat. (emory.edu)
  • pathway
  • The discharge pathway is supported by a multilingual patient and parent education video that can be viewed in the department and on the trust website. (bmj.com)
  • Strategy for change After designing the discharge pathway we presented it at departmental meetings and teaching sessions in order to get feedback. (bmj.com)
  • methods
  • They are detected at increased levels in some patients and can be measured using non-invasive methods during states of exacerbation and stable periods. (mdpi.com)
  • Objective
  • Objective To determine and compare the diagnostic accuracy of electrically elicited multiplet discharges (MDs) and fasciculation potentials (FPs) in motor neuron disease (MND). (bmj.com)
  • The objective of the current work was to gain a greater understanding of the influence of the urban/rural environment in Perthes' disease. (bmj.com)
  • behaviour
  • Low Level Tm: optional symptom management questions and behaviour prompts via text messages or website links for up to 12 months after discharge. (isrctn.com)
  • healthcare
  • Each day the patient will answer their symptom management questions, record their temperature and pulse oximetry readings and upload this data according to their agreed management plan before accessing a video or telephone consultation with a healthcare member of staff. (isrctn.com)
  • Disease management is defined as "a system of coordinated healthcare interventions and communications for populations with conditions in which patient self-care efforts are significant. (wikipedia.org)
  • percentage
  • A Mercer Consulting study indicated that the percentage of employer-sponsored health plans offering disease management programs grew to 58% in 2003, up from 41% in 2002. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnostic
  • Results Of the 61 patients enrolled in this diagnostic study, 24 patients were clinically diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and 11 patients with progressive muscular atrophy (PMA). (bmj.com)
  • progression
  • Compared with sorafenib alone, combining TACE with sorafenib might prolong survival and delay disease progression in patients with advanced HCC. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contributes to the TB pandemic because immune suppression increases the likelihood of rapid progression from TB infection to TB disease. (cdc.gov)
  • Bone Disease
  • A related condition, bisphosphonate-associated osteonecrosis of the jaw (BON), has been described as a side-effect of amino-bisphosphonates, a class of phosphorus-based drugs that inhibit bone resorption and are used widely for treating osteoporosis, bone disease in cancer and some other conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • It may result from an underlying disease, over-consumption of alcohol, from drugs administered during treatment of a disease, withdrawal from drugs or from any number of health factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • The good news, however, is that disease management offers some solutions to the 11 points. (blogspot.com)
  • However, removal of the jaw bone had serious effects on patients' ability to eat, leading to further health concerns including malnutrition. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, in 2008 the Disease Management Purchasing Consortium estimated that disease management organization revenues would be $2.8 billion by 2010. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, some disease management systems believe that reductions in longer term problems may not be measureable today, but may warrant continuation of disease management programs until better data is available in 10-20 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • complications
  • It is concerned with common chronic illnesses, and the reduction of future complications associated with those diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some dental diseases may be the result of a systemic problem and some may result in systemic complications. (wikipedia.org)
  • In all cases, dental procedures require a general anaesthetic so it is important to establish the cardiovascular and respiratory status and canine and feline physiological values of the patient to avoid risks or complications. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • Finally, a major risk factor for acquiring marburgvirus infection is occupational exposure, i.e. treating patients with MVD without proper personal protective equipment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Delirium may be caused by a disease process outside the brain that nonetheless affects the brain, such as infection (urinary tract infection, pneumonia) or drug effects, particularly anticholinergics or other CNS depressants (benzodiazepines and opioids). (wikipedia.org)
  • The patient had no malaria infection history, had no uneventful medical history prior to infection, and lived and worked in the malaria free area. (wikipedia.org)
  • care
  • Patients treated in the conventional care testing group will undergo the testing their doctor determines is best for them. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • All patients will receive care in an OU, and will be randomized to CMR, or conventional testing. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Patients in an OU CMR protocol will have lower cost for the index hospitalization than standard care. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The Disease Management Care Blog couldn't have said it better. (blogspot.com)
  • 5. " There is an overreliance on the indirectly obtained information of labs and imaging" and testing begets more testing as well as avoidable treatments that are the hidden part of health care cost iceberg: Disease management can help patients understand that they don't need another MRI. (blogspot.com)
  • seasoned care management coaches don't necessarily assume their clients are "patients" who are "sick. (blogspot.com)
  • medSolis pairs a simple, intuitive and scalable care management system with an easy-to-use hand-held patient "app. (blogspot.com)
  • 3 Half of all patients diagnosed will need help with personal care, and one third will eventually be institutionalised. (bmj.com)
  • The incumbent shall be responsible for providing support in patient care and in carrying out. (indeed.com)
  • Concerns began to emerge in the country about whether or not the health care sector could handle the influx of flu patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Used in health care, an ADT system is usually the foundation for other types of health care information systems because it holds valuable patient information such as a medical record number, age, name, and contact information. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease management has evolved from managed care, specialty capitation, and health service demand management, and refers to the processes and people concerned with improving or maintaining health in large populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2010, a study using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data estimated that 21.3% of patients in the U.S. with at least one chronic condition use disease management programs. (wikipedia.org)
  • A bedpan or bed pan is a receptacle used for the toileting of a bedridden patient in a health care facility, and is usually made of metal, glass, ceramic, or plastic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once identified, AdM Coaches work with these patients (patient engagement) to identify consequences (consequence analysis) with their plan of care that might result in non-adherence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Worldwide, half of all patients choose to not follow their plan of care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Motivational Interviewing takes more nurse educator time as together, with the patient, they attempt to identify and overcome areas of ambivalence concerning their disease process and plan of care. (wikipedia.org)
  • occupational
  • Phossy jaw, formally phosphorus necrosis of the jaw, is an occupational disease of those who work with white phosphorus, also known as yellow phosphorus, without proper safeguards. (wikipedia.org)
  • Modern occupational hygiene practices have eliminated the working conditions which caused this disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • onset
  • 3. " Disease onset can be gradual" and persons in the earliest stages of chronic illness may not meet the definition of even having a "disease" - yet: That's why active disease management is best suited for later stage conditions and offers prevention and wellness programs for the rest. (blogspot.com)
  • Conclusions
  • Conclusions The occurrence of Perthes' disease within urban environments is high, yet this appears to be a reflection of higher socioeconomic deprivation exposure. (bmj.com)
  • genetic
  • Chase and Foreman begin performing a battery of tests to look for genetic diseases and examine his ancestors' remains, but find nothing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Result
  • Additionally, many patients may be confined to a bed temporarily as a result of a temporary illness, injury, or surgery, thereby necessitating the use of a bedpan. (wikipedia.org)
  • AdM coaches identify patients at high risk for readmission as a direct result of not following their discharge plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • isolation
  • Also on the same day, it was announced that passengers arriving through the Bahrain International Airport would be screened and would also send suspicious flu patients to isolation wards. (wikipedia.org)