• STIs
  • Methods of prevention include not having sex, using condoms, not douching, and being tested for STIs before having sex with a new partner. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 Other reasons to visit a gynecologist include seeking treatment for irregular periods, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and vaginal infections. (ucsb.edu)
  • If left untreated, this can increase the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), genital herpes, chlamydia and gonorrhoea ( 7 , 8 , 12 ). (womhealth.org.au)
  • antibiotic
  • Antibiotic therapy for male partners seems of only marginal value, and the distinguishing characteristic of the infection is nearly no Lactobacillus vaginal presence, the main part of the flora that retains the lactic acid and peroxide balance so important in a healthy vagina. (diagnose-me.com)
  • Condoms
  • If an infection is ruled out, your doctor will ask questions about what chemicals or irritants (e.g., douches or latex condoms) your vagina has been exposed to. (medbroadcast.com)
  • Use of male condoms or female condoms may help prevent the spread of trichomoniasis, although careful studies have never been done that focus on how to prevent this infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • trichomoniasis
  • Infection with Trichomoniasis through water is unlikely because Trichomonas vaginalis dies in water after 45-60 minutes, in thermal water after 30 minutes to 3 hours and in diluted urine after 5-6 hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the exact association between trichomoniasis infection and HIV genital shedding has not been consistently demonstrated, "there is good evidence that TV treatment reduces HIV genital shedding. (wikipedia.org)
  • genital area
  • It is best to avoid douching, using perfumed talcs and deodorants in the genital area and using bubble-bath, soap, bath salts and shampoo when taking a bath (sitting in water that contains these products can disturb the natural environment in the vagina) ( 14 , 15 ). (womhealth.org.au)
  • swab
  • This is the most commonly used method and requires an endocervical, vaginal, or penile swab specimen for examination under a microscope. (wikipedia.org)