• coefficient
  • Since absolute aggregation rates are difficult to measure, one often refers to the dimensionless stability ratio W = kfast/k where kfast is the aggregation rate coefficient in the fast regime, and k the coefficient at the conditions of interest. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a common situation, the diffusion coefficient is constant, there are no sources or sinks, and the velocity field describes an incompressible flow (i.e., it has zero divergence). (wikipedia.org)
  • chemical
  • Glare reduction by diffusion may be achieved by roughening the glass surface using physical or chemical means, e.g., by grinding, sand blasting, or acid etching. (google.com)
  • Current theory holds that the elastic strain in the neighborhood of a defect is smaller toward the axis of greatest differential compression, creating a defect chemical potential gradient (depending upon lattice strain) within the crystal that leads to net accumulation of defects at the faces of maximum compression by diffusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • In these techniques light is focused on a sample and the measured fluorescence intensity fluctuations (due to diffusion, physical or chemical reactions, aggregation, etc.) are analyzed using the temporal autocorrelation. (wikipedia.org)
  • crystalline
  • In interstitial lattice diffusion, a diffusant (such as C in an iron alloy), will diffuse in between the lattice structure of another crystalline element. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diffusion creep is caused by the migration of crystalline defects through the lattice of a crystal such that when a crystal is subjected to a greater degree of compression in one direction relative to another, defects migrate to the crystal faces along the direction of compression, causing a net mass transfer that shortens the crystal in the direction of maximum compression. (wikipedia.org)
  • aggregation
  • Some people refer specifically to flocculation when aggregation is induced by addition of polymers or polyelectrolytes, while coagulation is used in a broader sense. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the course of aggregation, the aggregates will grow in size, and as a consequence they may settle to the bottom of the container, which is referred to as sedimentation. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the interaction potential shows an intermediate barrier, the aggregation is slowed down by the fact that numerous attempts will be necessary to overcome this barrier, and one refers to slow or reaction limited aggregation (RLA). (wikipedia.org)
  • Examples
  • In organizational studies, its basic epidemiological or internal-influence form was formulated by H. Earl Pemberton, who provided examples of institutional diffusion such as postage stamps and standardized school ethics codes. (wikipedia.org)
  • simultaneous
  • When a crystal deforms by diffusion creep to accommodate space problems from simultaneous grain boundary sliding (the movement of whole grains along grain boundaries) this is called granular or superplastic flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diffusion creep can also be simultaneous with pressure solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • closely
  • In plasma physics, ambipolar diffusion is closely related to the concept of quasineutrality. (wikipedia.org)
  • His methodologies are closely followed in recent diffusion research, even as the field has expanded into, and been influenced by, other methodological disciplines such as social network analysis and communication. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • In computational physics, numerical dissipation (also known as "numerical diffusion") refers to certain side-effects that may occur as a result of a numerical solution to a differential equation. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanism
  • In these systems, the plaintext and the key often have a very similar role in producing the output, hence the same mechanism ensures both diffusion and confusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • concept
  • The concept of diffusion was first studied by the French sociologist Gabriel Tarde in late 19th century and by German and Austrian anthropologists and geographers such as Friedrich Ratzel and Leo Frobenius. (wikipedia.org)
  • spread
  • Horizontal diffusion refers to whether e-learning has spread to influence the practice of more teachers and students. (igi-global.com)
  • Diffusion refers to the spread of information from areas of high concentration to low concentration. (jamcarthur.com)
  • Demic diffusion, as opposed to trans-cultural diffusion, is a demographic term referring to a migratory model, developed by Luigi Luca Cavalli-Sforza, of population diffusion into and across an area that had been previously uninhabited by that group, possibly, but not necessarily, displacing, replacing, or intermixing with a pre-existing population (such as has been suggested for the spread of agriculture across Neolithic Europe and several other Landnahme events). (wikipedia.org)
  • Adoption
  • The overall findings are that, while adoption of simple strategies is increasing, there is little evidence of horizontal and vertical diffusion of more complex strategies. (igi-global.com)
  • A study of the adoption of hybrid corn seed in Iowa by Ryan and Gross (1943) solidified the prior work on diffusion into a distinct paradigm that would be cited consistently in the future. (wikipedia.org)
  • certain
  • Substitution refers to the replacement of certain components (usually bits) with other components, following certain rules. (wikipedia.org)
  • results
  • More precisely, Arnold diffusion refers to results asserting the existence of solutions to nearly integrable Hamiltonian systems that exhibit a significant change in the action variables. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diffusion creep results in plastic deformation rather than brittle failure of the material. (wikipedia.org)
  • single
  • Diffusion means that if we change a single bit of the plaintext, then (statistically) half of the bits in the ciphertext should change, and similarly, if we change one bit of the ciphertext, then approximately one half of the plaintext bits should change. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diffusion means that changing a single character of the input will change many characters of the output. (wikipedia.org)
  • Data
  • 2002. Y genetic data support the Neolithic demic diffusion model. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2004 Origin, Diffusion, and Differentiation of Y-Chromosome Haplogroups E and J: Inferences on the Neolithization of Europe and Later Migratory Events in the Mediterranean Area, 2004 Y genetic data support the Neolithic demic diffusion model, Chikhi 2002. (wikipedia.org)