• intake
  • Two methods that have been investigated as potential tools for meal planning and/or assessing disease risk associated with dietary carbohydrate intake are the glycemic index and the glycemic load. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • 1 The study recorded the dietary intake of 135,335 people using validated food frequency questionnaires, with a median follow-up of 7.4 years. (bmj.com)
  • Toddlers and preschoolers generally ate too little dietary fiber, and preschoolers generally ate too much saturated fat, although the overall fat intake was lower than recommended. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research in the 1980s led to a modified carbo-loading regimen that eliminates the depletion phase, instead calling for increased carbohydrate intake (to about 70% of total calories) and decreased training for three days before the event. (wikipedia.org)
  • The composition of carbohydrates in the athlete's diet during carbohydrate loading is as important as their share of the overall caloric intake. (wikipedia.org)
  • Taking as his basic thesis that the pattern of our hormonal secretion is still tuned to the largely animal food diet of that distant epoch, Lutz surmised that too large an intake of carbohydrate might disturb the intrinsic harmony of the endocrine system and hence our health, ultimately leading to disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • As it went to the very root of the problem, the simple expedient of sufficient carbohydrate restriction (with no limitation put on protein or fat intake, nor on calories except as a short-term measure for extreme obesity) proved a remarkable therapeutic tool. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • AMP-activated protein kinase and carbohydrate response element binding protein: a study of two potential regulatory factors in the hepatic lipogenic program of broiler chickens. (semanticscholar.org)
  • 2003. The cornell net carbohydrate and protein system for evaluating herd nutrition and nutrient excretion: Model Documentation, Mimeo no.213. (koreascience.or.kr)
  • Protein and nonstructural carbohydrate (pectin, sugars, and starches) are also fermented. (wikipedia.org)
  • Often in lists of nutritional information, such as the USDA National Nutrient Database, the term "carbohydrate" (or "carbohydrate by difference") is used for everything other than water, protein, fat, ash, and ethanol. (wikipedia.org)
  • The typical American diet is about 50% carbohydrate, 15% protein, and 35% fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • These macronutrient intakes fall within the Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges (AMDR) for adults identified by the Food and Nutrition Board of the United States Institute of Medicine as "associated with reduced risk of chronic diseases while providing adequate intakes of essential nutrients," which are 45-65% carbohydrate, 10-35% protein, and 20-35% fat as a percentage of total energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • fiber
  • Normally, just about all non-fiber dietary carbohydrate will be absorbed across the wall of our small intestine. (karelsavry.us)
  • A third class of dietary material, fiber (i.e., nondigestible material such as cellulose), seems also to be required, for both mechanical and biochemical reasons, though the exact reasons remain unclear. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention is by maintaining a healthy weight and eating a diet high in fiber and low in simple carbohydrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also includes dietary fiber which is a carbohydrate but which does not contribute much in the way of food energy (calories), even though it is often included in the calculation of total food energy just as though it were a sugar. (wikipedia.org)
  • glycemic load
  • Working with Walter Willett, Liu was among the first to introduce dietary glycemic load (GL) and quantify its physiological relevancy in population-based studies and prospectively link high GL to increased cardiovascular risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diabetes
  • The purpose of this statement is to review the available scientific data regarding the effect of the type or source of carbohydrate on the prevention and management of diabetes and to clarify the position of the American Diabetes Association on this important topic. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Whatever success low fat dietary approaches have had in improving diabetes is to be applauded but it is reasonable for patients to be aware of the potential benefits of an alternative approach which we present here. (diabetes-book.com)
  • Chemical
  • Chemical digestion of carbohydrates picks up again in the small intestine as the pancreas delivers pancreatic amylase along with a battery of other digestive enzymes. (karelsavry.us)
  • This will include chemical compounds such as acetic or lactic acid, which are not normally considered carbohydrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, carbohydrates often display chemical groups such as: N-acetyl (e.g. chitin), sulphate (e.g. glycosaminoglycans), carboxylic acid (e.g. sialic acid) and deoxy modifications (e.g. fucose and sialic acid). (wikipedia.org)
  • reduces
  • As the swallowed food/saliva mixture reaches the stomach, the acidic juice reduces the activity of salivary amylase, which halts carbohydrate digestion. (karelsavry.us)
  • carbon
  • Like other carbohydrates, it combusts to carbon dioxide and water. (wikipedia.org)
  • In scientific literature, the term "carbohydrate" has many synonyms, like "sugar" (in the broad sense), "saccharide", "ose", "glucide", "hydrate of carbon" or "polyhydroxy compounds with aldehyde or ketone" Some of these terms, specially "carbohydrate" and "sugar", are also used with other meanings. (wikipedia.org)
  • diet
  • The Western pattern diet or standard American diet (SAD) is a modern dietary pattern that is generally characterized by high intakes of red and processed meat, butter, fried foods, high-fat dairy products, eggs, refined grains, potatoes, and high-sugar drinks. (wikipedia.org)
  • His book with Christian Allan: Life without Bread: How a low-carbohydrate diet can save your life is still in print after 16 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • This caused him, as early as the 1950s, to instigate a diet for long-term use that he felt to be low enough in carbohydrate to be compatible with our genetic inheritance and so restore the missing harmony. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hens like humans had moved from a largely animal to a largely carbohydrate diet and suffered similar changes in their arterial walls in old age. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wolfgang Lutz also found that his low carbohydrate diet brought patients many general improvements amongst which were improved immune function, a calmer nervous system, better digestion, enhanced skin and tissue quality, and a positive effect on overall health. (wikipedia.org)
  • bread
  • They make up a large part of foods such as rice, noodles, bread, and other grain-based products, but they are not an essential nutrient, meaning a human does not need to eat carbohydrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitamins
  • The same year, he started research at the Dunn Nutritional Laboratory in Cambridge, working principally on the effects of dietary vitamins. (wikipedia.org)
  • High
  • The downstream stimulus-response processes are a current research interest (see e.g. [4, but, according to the view considered here, dietary fat has a generally passive role and deleterious effects of fat are almost always seen in the presence of high carbohydrate. (diabetes-book.com)
  • On the day before the race, the athlete performs a very short, extremely high-intensity workout (such as a few minutes of sprinting) then consumes 12 g of carbohydrate per kilogram of lean mass over the next 24 hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Consequently, sources of high-fructose carbohydrates, such as fruit and sweets, are less than optimal for the task. (wikipedia.org)
  • he showed low carbohydrate nutrition could lower cholesterol levels, normalise high and low levels of blood iron and calcium and ease many problems of reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • source
  • A study has shown that mussels provide the best food along with a carbohydrate source in the form of agar, allowing faster grow rates in the lobster. (wikipedia.org)
  • Critical
  • Our pre-hominin primate ancestors were broadly herbivorous, relying on either foliage or fruits and nuts and the shift in dietary breadth during the Paleolithic is often considered a critical point in hominin evolution. (wikipedia.org)