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  • Cutaneous
  • Cutaneous, which affects the skin. (icdlist.com)
  • Patients with primary cutaneous aspergillosis often give a history of injured skin exposure to a possibly contaminated object. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Primary cutaneous aspergillosis can occasionally be seen in healthy patients, or can rarely be the presenting sign of an underlying immunosuppression, and in the right clinical circumstances this diagnosis should be suspected even if there is no apparent immune defect. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Primary cutaneous aspergillosis can have various clinical manifestations, but the most characteristic lesion is a black eschar overlying a red or purple patch, plaque, or nodule at the location of skin injury ( Figure 1 ). (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Diagnosis of all types of cutaneous aspergillosis depends on seeing the hyphal forms in the tissue. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • At least 17 subtypes of EBS have now been described, distinguished by differences in clinical phenotype (to include anatomic distribution of lesions, cutaneous morphology, extracutaneous findings, and overall severity), genetic mode of inheritance, ultrastructural level of skin cleavage and/or ultrastructural morphological features, and molecular basis of disease. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • It should be emphasized that some cutaneous and extracutaneous findings may not develop until at least age 1, and that most EB infants later subclassified as having a more localized disease subtype have generalized skin involvement during the first several months of life, making the use of these findings as surrogate diagnostic markers for subclassification very imprecise. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • clinical
  • This article covers diagnosis, including descriptions of the different clinical presentations of surface, superficial and deep bacterial skin infections, how to perform and interpret cytology, and how to best use bacterial culture and sensitivity testing. (bmj.com)
  • Part 1 will discuss diagnosis of pyoderma using clinical signs, cytology and bacterial culture and antimicrobial sensitivity tests. (bmj.com)
  • This article proposes a clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of Kawasaki disease in the UK based on the best available evidence to date, and highlights areas of practice where evidence is anecdotal or based on retrospective data. (bmj.com)
  • The purpose of this article is to provide a clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of KD in the UK. (bmj.com)
  • There is no diagnostic test for KD, therefore diagnosis is based on clinical criteria (table 1) 2 and the exclusion of other diseases, particularly sepsis. (bmj.com)
  • The potential for epizootics is highest at 10 °C and the disease does not occur naturally above 15 °C. Clinical signs of infection with IHNV include abdominal distension, bulging of the eyes, skin darkening, abnormal behavior, anemia, and fading of the gills. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diagnosis of TEN is based on both clinical and histologic findings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mild defects in T-cell function can also be observed, in addition to an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio Once a diagnosis is made, the treatment is based on an individual's clinical condition and may include standard management for autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once a diagnosis is made, treatment is based on an individual's clinical condition and may include medication and other strategies for managing infections, allergies, and asthma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptomatic infections are apparent and clinical, whereas an infection that is active but does not produce noticeable symptoms may be called inapparent, silent, subclinical, or occult. (wikipedia.org)
  • rash
  • In patients who survive the initial phase of the infection, the rash desquamates, or peels off, after 10-14 days. (wikipedia.org)
  • is a life-threatening infection characterized by severe headache, sore throat, fever as high as 105 ° F (40.6 ° C), and a sunburn-like rash that spreads from the face to the rest of the body. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This reddened skin or rash may signal a deeper, more serious infection of the inner layers of skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • This characteristic rash has been denoted as "scarlatiniform" and it appears as a diffuse redness of the skin with small papules, or bumps, which resemble goose pimples. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the rash spreads, it becomes more pronounced in creases in the skin, such as the skin folds in the inguinal and axillary regions of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within 1 week of onset the rash begins to fade followed by a longer process of desquamation, or shedding of the outer layer of skin, which lasts several weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children who have darker skin can have a different presentation in that the redness of the skin involved in the rash and the ring of paleness around the mouth can be less obvious. (wikipedia.org)
  • e.g., the infection may be in the nasopharynx, but the rash is found usually on the upper dermis and superficial lymphatics. (wikipedia.org)
  • superficial
  • Skin biopsy may show separation of the superficial layer of the epidermis (intraepidermal separation), differentiating SSSS from TEN, wherein the separation occurs at the dermo-epidermal junction (subepidermal separation). (wikipedia.org)
  • It is an infection of the upper dermis and superficial lymphatics, usually caused by beta-hemolytic group A Streptococcus bacteria on scratches or otherwise infected areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Infection of the eyelash follicle/sebaceous gland (hordeolum) Debris in the tear film, seen under magnification (improved contrast with use of fluorescein drops) Chronic blepharitis may result in damage of varying severity and, in the worst cases, may have a negative effect on vision. (wikipedia.org)
  • Repeated infection of the extremities can lead to chronic swelling (lymphangitis). (wikipedia.org)
  • A long-term infection is a chronic infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • These individuals often experience severe pain at the site of the skin infection, followed by rapid progression of symptoms as described above for TSS. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although present on the skin of only 5 - 20% of healthy people, as many as 40% carry it elsewhere, such as in the throat, vagina, or rectum, for varying periods of time, from hours to years, without developing symptoms or becoming ill. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Anterior blepharitis is either staphylococcal blepharitis,or seborrhoeic blepharitis which have symptoms of the presence of scales that are along the hair shaft. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis is usually based on the presenting signs and symptoms, while cell culture is rarely possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • Staphylococcal blepharitis and Posterior blepharitis or rosacea-associated blepharitis Symptoms Symptoms include a foreign body sensation, matting of the lashes, and burning. (wikipedia.org)
  • In adults, the signs and symptoms of infection may still be present at the time when the kidney problems develop, and the terms infection-related glomerulonephritis or bacterial infection-related glomerulonephritis are also used. (wikipedia.org)
  • While illness symptoms resolve in a day or two, the skin may take weeks to return to normal. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnostic
  • Being part of the normal skin flora, S. epidermidis is a frequent contaminant of specimens sent to the diagnostic laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Boils
  • Boils can be caused by other skin conditions that cause the person to scratch and damage the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common complications of boils are scarring and infection or abscess of the skin, spinal cord, brain, kidneys, or other organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Squeezing or cutting boils in the danger triangle of the face can be particularly dangerous if done outside a medical setting, as blood vessels in this area drain into the brain and can carry serious infections there. (wikipedia.org)
  • MRSA
  • Manual practitioners work in environments where MRSA is a common acquired infection. (chiro.org)
  • The purpose of this review is to provide a practical overview of MRSA as it applies to the manual therapy professions (eg, physical and occupational therapy, athletic training, chiropractic, osteopathy, massage, sports medicine) and to discuss how to identify and prevent MRSA infections in manual therapy work environments. (chiro.org)
  • Manual practitioners can play an essential role in recognizing MRSA infections and helping to control its transmission in the health care environment and the community. (chiro.org)
  • Concern is related to the presence of pus or previous MRSA infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Despite intensive research into the illness the cause remains unknown, and although there have been significant improvements in diagnosis and treatment of children with the disease there are still a number of important unanswered questions regarding therapy. (bmj.com)
  • Treatment of skin infections depends on the cause. (icdlist.com)
  • The mainstay of treatment for SSSS is supportive care along with eradication of the primary infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common treatment for these infections is to remove or replace the infected implant, though in all cases, prevention is ideal. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Healing occurs in 7-10 days and is accompanied by a shedding or peeling of the outer layer of skin. (aocd.org)
  • inflammation
  • A biopsy will show splitting of the outermost layer of the skin, the epidermis, as well as slight inflammation. (aocd.org)
  • The infection causes blood vessels in the kidneys to develop inflammation, this hampers the renal organs ability to filter urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mammalian hosts react to infections with an innate response, often involving inflammation, followed by an adaptive response. (wikipedia.org)
  • causative
  • The goals of therapy are to confirm that an infection is present, identify the causative bacteria, select the most appropriate antimicrobial, ensure that the infection is treated correctly, and to identify and manage any underlying conditions. (bmj.com)
  • include
  • Risk factors for the staphylococcal type include the use of very absorbent tampons and skin lesions in young children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other causes can include infections such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and cytomegalovirus or the cause may remain unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initial skin findings include red-purple, dusky, flat spots known as macules that start on the trunk and spread out from there. (wikipedia.org)
  • blisters
  • EBS is separated into two major subtypes, basal and suprabasal, based on the ultrastructural level in which blisters arise, either spontaneously or following minor mechanical traction to the skin. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Large, soft blisters develop at the site of infection and elsewhere. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The skin wrinkles and forms blisters, then peels off in large sheets leaving a moist, red, glistening surface. (aocd.org)
  • These skin lesions then transform into large blisters. (wikipedia.org)
  • More severe infections can result in vesicles (pox or insect bite-like marks), blisters, and petechiae (small purple or red spots), with possible skin necrosis (death). (wikipedia.org)
  • toxin
  • The toxin is released and affects the skin causing it to be red, tender, with a sandpaper-like texture. (aocd.org)
  • wound infections
  • Opportunistic infection may be caused by microbes ordinarily in contact with the host, such as pathogenic bacteria or fungi in the gastrointestinal or the upper respiratory tract, and they may also result from (otherwise innocuous) microbes acquired from other hosts (as in Clostridium difficile colitis) or from the environment as a result of traumatic introduction (as in surgical wound infections or compound fractures). (wikipedia.org)
  • immune
  • Although S. epidermidis is not usually pathogenic, patients with compromised immune systems are at risk of developing infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • It appears that a certain type of immune cell (cytotoxic CD8+ T cell) is primarily responsible for keratinocyte death and subsequent skin detachment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hosts can fight infections using their immune system. (wikipedia.org)