• Boils
  • Boils can be caused by other skin conditions that cause the person to scratch and damage the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common complications of boils are scarring and infection or abscess of the skin, spinal cord, brain, kidneys, or other organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Squeezing or cutting boils in the danger triangle of the face can be particularly dangerous if done outside a medical setting, as blood vessels in this area drain into the brain and can carry serious infections there. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cutaneous
  • Cutaneous, which affects the skin. (icdlist.com)
  • Patients with primary cutaneous aspergillosis often give a history of injured skin exposure to a possibly contaminated object. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Primary cutaneous aspergillosis can occasionally be seen in healthy patients, or can rarely be the presenting sign of an underlying immunosuppression, and in the right clinical circumstances this diagnosis should be suspected even if there is no apparent immune defect. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Primary cutaneous aspergillosis can have various clinical manifestations, but the most characteristic lesion is a black eschar overlying a red or purple patch, plaque, or nodule at the location of skin injury ( Figure 1 ). (renalandurologynews.com)
  • Diagnosis of all types of cutaneous aspergillosis depends on seeing the hyphal forms in the tissue. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • At least 17 subtypes of EBS have now been described, distinguished by differences in clinical phenotype (to include anatomic distribution of lesions, cutaneous morphology, extracutaneous findings, and overall severity), genetic mode of inheritance, ultrastructural level of skin cleavage and/or ultrastructural morphological features, and molecular basis of disease. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • It should be emphasized that some cutaneous and extracutaneous findings may not develop until at least age 1, and that most EB infants later subclassified as having a more localized disease subtype have generalized skin involvement during the first several months of life, making the use of these findings as surrogate diagnostic markers for subclassification very imprecise. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • staph bacteria
  • Although staph bacteria are usually harmless, when injury or a break in the skin enables the organisms to invade the body and overcome the body's natural defenses, consequences can range from minor discomfort to death. (encyclopedia.com)
  • clinical
  • This article covers diagnosis, including descriptions of the different clinical presentations of surface, superficial and deep bacterial skin infections, how to perform and interpret cytology, and how to best use bacterial culture and sensitivity testing. (bmj.com)
  • Part 1 will discuss diagnosis of pyoderma using clinical signs, cytology and bacterial culture and antimicrobial sensitivity tests. (bmj.com)
  • This article proposes a clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of Kawasaki disease in the UK based on the best available evidence to date, and highlights areas of practice where evidence is anecdotal or based on retrospective data. (bmj.com)
  • The purpose of this article is to provide a clinical guideline for the diagnosis and treatment of KD in the UK. (bmj.com)
  • The diagnosis of TEN is based on both clinical and histologic findings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mild defects in T-cell function can also be observed, in addition to an inverted CD4/CD8 ratio Once a diagnosis is made, the treatment is based on an individual's clinical condition and may include standard management for autoimmunity and immunodeficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once a diagnosis is made, treatment is based on an individual's clinical condition and may include medication and other strategies for managing infections, allergies, and asthma. (wikipedia.org)
  • rash
  • In patients who survive the initial phase of the infection, the rash desquamates, or peels off, after 10-14 days. (wikipedia.org)
  • is a life-threatening infection characterized by severe headache, sore throat, fever as high as 105 ° F (40.6 ° C), and a sunburn-like rash that spreads from the face to the rest of the body. (encyclopedia.com)
  • This reddened skin or rash may signal a deeper, more serious infection of the inner layers of skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • This characteristic rash has been denoted as "scarlatiniform" and it appears as a diffuse redness of the skin with small papules, or bumps, which resemble goose pimples. (wikipedia.org)
  • After the rash spreads, it becomes more pronounced in creases in the skin, such as the skin folds in the inguinal and axillary regions of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within 1 week of onset the rash begins to fade followed by a longer process of desquamation, or shedding of the outer layer of skin, which lasts several weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children who have darker skin can have a different presentation in that the redness of the skin involved in the rash and the ring of paleness around the mouth can be less obvious. (wikipedia.org)
  • e.g., the infection may be in the nasopharynx, but the rash is found usually on the upper dermis and superficial lymphatics. (wikipedia.org)
  • superficial
  • Skin biopsy may show separation of the superficial layer of the epidermis (intraepidermal separation), differentiating SSSS from TEN, wherein the separation occurs at the dermo-epidermal junction (subepidermal separation). (wikipedia.org)
  • It is an infection of the upper dermis and superficial lymphatics, usually caused by beta-hemolytic group A Streptococcus bacteria on scratches or otherwise infected areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • systemic
  • Bacterial skin infections are one of the most common reasons for using systemic antimicrobials in dogs and cats. (bmj.com)
  • In children, these systemic (affecting the whole body) or disseminated infections frequently affect the ends of the long bones of the arms or legs, causing a bone infection called osteomyelitis. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Progression of a stye to a systemic infection (spreading throughout the body) is extremely rare, and only a few instances of such spread have been recorded. (wikipedia.org)
  • wound
  • A hospitalized patient may report the presence of an arm board, adhesive tape or occlusive dressings over an intravenous catheter site, wound, or macerated skin. (renalandurologynews.com)
  • treatment
  • Treatment of skin infections depends on the cause. (icdlist.com)
  • Despite intensive research into the illness the cause remains unknown, and although there have been significant improvements in diagnosis and treatment of children with the disease there are still a number of important unanswered questions regarding therapy. (bmj.com)
  • The mainstay of treatment for SSSS is supportive care along with eradication of the primary infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common treatment for these infections is to remove or replace the infected implant, though in all cases, prevention is ideal. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • Healing occurs in 7-10 days and is accompanied by a shedding or peeling of the outer layer of skin. (aocd.org)
  • diagnostic
  • Being part of the normal skin flora, S. epidermidis is a frequent contaminant of specimens sent to the diagnostic laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • blisters
  • EBS is separated into two major subtypes, basal and suprabasal, based on the ultrastructural level in which blisters arise, either spontaneously or following minor mechanical traction to the skin. (oncologynurseadvisor.com)
  • Large, soft blisters develop at the site of infection and elsewhere. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The skin wrinkles and forms blisters, then peels off in large sheets leaving a moist, red, glistening surface. (aocd.org)
  • These skin lesions then transform into large blisters. (wikipedia.org)
  • More severe infections can result in vesicles (pox or insect bite-like marks), blisters, and petechiae (small purple or red spots), with possible skin necrosis (death). (wikipedia.org)