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  • impulsivity
  • In psychology, impulsivity (or impulsiveness) is a tendency to act on a whim, displaying behavior characterized by little or no forethought, reflection, or consideration of the consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurobiological findings suggest that there are specific brain regions involved in impulsive behavior, although different brain networks may contribute to different manifestations of impulsivity, and that genetics may play a role. (wikipedia.org)
  • High PCL-R scores are positively associated with measures of impulsivity and aggression, Machiavellianism, persistent criminal behavior, and negatively associated with measures of empathy and affiliation. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • One of the symptoms of conduct disorder is a lower level of fear. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first is known as the "childhood-onset type" and occurs when conduct disorder symptoms are present before the age of 10 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are used solely to treat the symptoms associated with this disorder and the symptoms will come back once the medication stops. (wikipedia.org)
  • An overall distinction is also commonly made between a "medical model" (also known as a biomedical or disease model) and a "social model" (also known as an empowerment or recovery model) of mental disorder and disability, with the former focusing on hypothesized disease processes and symptoms, and the latter focusing on hypothesized social constructionism and social contexts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Factor 1 captures traits dealing with the interpersonal and affective deficits of psychopathy (e.g., shallow affect, superficial charm, manipulativeness, lack of empathy) whereas factor 2 dealt with symptoms relating to antisocial behavior: (e.g., criminal versatility, impulsiveness, irresponsibility, poor behavior controls, juvenile delinquency). (wikipedia.org)
  • adolescents
  • Despite being the most commonly studied and diagnosed mental disorder in children and adolescents, the exact cause is unknown in the majority of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pediatric psychology is a multidisciplinary field of both scientific research and clinical practice which attempts to address the psychological aspects of illness, injury, and the promotion of health behaviors in children, adolescents, and families in a pediatric health setting. (wikipedia.org)
  • comorbid
  • There is some evidence to support the clinical lore that children with "TS-only" (Tourette syndrome in the absence of other comorbid conditions) are unusually gifted: neuropsychological studies have identified advantages in children with TS-only. (wikipedia.org)
  • abnormal
  • In contrast to the abnormal movements of other movement disorders (for example, choreas, dystonias, myoclonus, and dyskinesias), the tics of Tourette's are temporarily suppressible, nonrhythmic, and often preceded by an unwanted premonitory urge. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abnormal functioning of neurotransmitter systems has been implicated[citation needed] in several mental disorders, including serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine and glutamate systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • behavioral
  • As defined by experts with a biomedical background, a mental disorder is "a clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome or psychological pattern that occurs in an individual and that is associated with present disability or with a significantly increased risk of suffering, death, pain, disability, or an important loss of freedom. (wikipedia.org)
  • tics
  • Tourette syndrome (TS or simply Tourette's) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by multiple motor tics and at least one vocal (phonic) tic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tourette's was classified by the fourth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) as one of several tic disorders "usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence" according to type (motor or phonic tics) and duration (transient or chronic). (wikipedia.org)
  • Transient tic disorders consisted of multiple motor tics, phonic tics or both, with a duration between four weeks and twelve months. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic tic disorder was either single or multiple, motor or phonic tics (but not both), which were present for more than a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tourette syndrome is an inherited neurological disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by the presence of motor and phonic tics. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • These behaviors are often referred to as "antisocial behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, if the "Chief Enabler" (the main enabler in the family) will often turn a blind eye to the addict's drug/alcohol use as this allows for the enabler to continue to play the victim and/or martyr role, while allowing the addict to continue his/her own destructive behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Often has trouble keeping attention on tasks or play activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neuropsychological reports are often poorly communicated to educators, resulting in a gap between what a report recommends and what education is provided. (wikipedia.org)
  • Precursors of mental health disorders in adulthood can often be identified in early childhood (e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children
  • If the caregiver is able to provide therapeutic intervention teaching children at risk better empathy skills, the child will have a lower incident level of conduct disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is debate among professionals regarding the validity and appropriateness of diagnosing young children with conduct disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • A premature diagnosis made in young children, and thus labeling an individual, may be inappropriate. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also argued that some children may not in fact have conduct disorder, but are engaging in developmentally appropriate disruptive behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with conduct disorder have a high risk of developing other adjustment problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • In children, problems paying attention may result in poor school performance. (wikipedia.org)
  • differences
  • Variation in rate of diagnoses may be attributed to differences between populations (i.e., culture), and differences in diagnostic methodologies. (wikipedia.org)
  • tendency
  • This person demonstrates "a strong tendency to avoid any confrontation of the addictive behavior and a subconscious effort to actively perpetuate the addiction. (wikipedia.org)
  • levels
  • The condition can be difficult to tell apart from other disorders, as well as to distinguish from high levels of activity that are still within the normal-range. (wikipedia.org)
  • relative
  • About one-fourth of the U.S. population is a member of family that is affected by an addictive disorder in a first-degree relative. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • The PCL-R is used for indicating a dimensional score, or a categorical diagnosis, of psychopathy for clinical, legal or research purposes. (wikipedia.org)
  • family
  • Alcoholism in family systems refers to the conditions in families that enable alcoholism, and the effects of alcoholic behavior by one or more family members on the rest of the family. (wikipedia.org)
  • mental disorder
  • As defined by experts with a biomedical background, a mental disorder is "a clinically significant behavioral or psychological syndrome or psychological pattern that occurs in an individual and that is associated with present disability or with a significantly increased risk of suffering, death, pain, disability, or an important loss of freedom. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1999
  • Such patterns of comorbidity among psychiatric disorders highlight possible common etiological processes, genetic influences, or maintaining factors among subsets of disorders, and may also have implications for treatment selection and responsiveness to specific therapies ( Krueger, 1999 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • person's
  • It is characterized by problems paying attention, excessive activity, or difficulty controlling behavior which is not appropriate for a person's age. (wikipedia.org)
  • Family studies indicate that the closer a person's genetic relatedness to a person with schizophrenia, the greater the likelihood of developing the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dyskinesias
  • In contrast to the abnormal movements of other movement disorders (for example, choreas, dystonias, myoclonus, and dyskinesias), the tics of Tourette's are temporarily suppressible, nonrhythmic, and often preceded by an unwanted premonitory urge. (wikipedia.org)
  • Processes
  • Biological psychiatry has tended to follow a biomedical model focused on organic or "hardware" pathology of the brain, where many mental disorders are conceptualized as disorders of brain circuits likely caused by developmental processes shaped by a complex interplay of genetics and experience. (wikipedia.org)
  • Abnormal
  • Abnormal functioning of neurotransmitter systems has been implicated[citation needed] in several mental disorders, including serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine and glutamate systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disease
  • Participants with an illness or disease also participate to help others, but also to possibly receive the newest treatment and to have the additional care and attention from the clinical trial staff. (patientsville.com)
  • analyses
  • Conditional probability and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses will examine the diagnostic utility of the EEG scan, using the clinical diagnosis of ASD as the gold standard. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • transient
  • Acute stress and substance use as predictors of suicidal behaviour in acute and transient psychotic disorders. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Several authors have reported high rates of suicidal behaviour in acute and transient psychotic disorders (ATPD). (bioportfolio.com)
  • Tourette's was classified by the fourth version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV-TR) as one of several tic disorders "usually first diagnosed in infancy, childhood, or adolescence" according to type (motor or phonic tics) and duration (transient or chronic). (wikipedia.org)
  • Transient tic disorders consisted of multiple motor tics, phonic tics or both, with a duration between four weeks and twelve months. (wikipedia.org)
  • patterns
  • To address this apparent contradiction, confirmatory factor analytic methods and information-theoretic criteria were used to evaluate four theoretically plausible measurement models based on lifetime comorbidity patterns of seven putative externalizing disorders. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Non-random patterns of diagnostic comorbidity among some combinations of psychiatric disorders are common and likely meaningful. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • common
  • Tourette syndrome (TS or simply Tourette's) is a common neuropsychiatric disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by multiple motor tics and at least one vocal (phonic) tic. (wikipedia.org)