• wildlife
  • We could see first-hand the impact that people have on wildlife, by unintentionally exposing them to increased risk from parasitic diseases," said Professor Thompson. (edu.au)
  • The website is a major part of the overall Healthy Wildlife Healthy Lives project, which has been developed by the Eastern Metropolitan Regional Council (EMRC), in partnership with the Murdoch Professors, Kanyana Wildlife Rehabilitation Centre and Native Animal Rescue . (edu.au)
  • Studies from the newly dedicated Karen C. Drayer Wildlife Health Center discovered the presence of brucellosis in harbor seals and the H1N1 flu strain in elephant seals, increasing the understanding of One Health issues among human, animals and the environment. (ucdavis.edu)
  • Although coenurosis is more commonly associated with domestic animals, it has also been documented in wildlife. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathogenic
  • In addition, the pathogenic agents of many rabbit diseases are known and in some cases well described, but their presence does not necessarily imply the existence of a disease. (fao.org)
  • Disease is almost always the result of poor husbandry and environment coupled with the onslaught of a pathogenic agent - microbe, virus or parasite. (fao.org)
  • pathogens
  • In addition, recreational hunting of wild boars and consumption of wild boar meats in some regions of the world further provided ample opportunities for direct human contacts with wild boars, and thus created an ideal environment for the transmission of pathogens between wild boars and domestic swine, and between wild boars and humans ( Gibbs 1997 ). (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Today, with the increasing use of antibiotics, we are facing a third epidemiological transition, a reemergence of infectious disease, with pathogens that are antibiotic-resistant and have the potential to be transmitted on a global scale. (si.edu)
  • Emerging' pathogens are seen as new diseases, discovered when they have an impact on our adaptation or survival. (si.edu)
  • insects
  • Distinguishing acarines from insects (subphylum Hexapoda) is similarly important because the term 'insect' is often used in popular text and speech for various small crawling animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emerging
  • Human babesiosis is an uncommon but emerging disease in the Northeastern and Midwestern United States and parts of Europe, and sporadic throughout the rest of the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even when we take a more holistic ecological perspective, it is often limited to a position that considers emerging disease as the result of environmental changes that are only relevant to the present situation as it affects humans here and now. (si.edu)
  • transmit
  • A significant contribution to the northward spread of Bluetongue disease has been the ability of Culicoides obsoletus and C.pulicaris to acquire and transmit the pathogen, both of which are spread widely throughout Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • feeders
  • Heterakis gallinarum is a nematode parasite that lives in the cecum of some galliform birds, particularly in ground feeders such as domestic chickens and turkeys. (wikipedia.org)
  • birds
  • The lifecycle of T. gondii can be broadly summarized into two components: a sexual component that occurs only within cats (felids, wild or domestic), and an asexual component that can occur within virtually all warm-blooded animals, including humans, cats, and birds. (wikipedia.org)
  • vaccines
  • The Station was the first purpose-built, farm-based facility of Australia's first Stock Institute and its work was primarily to research and control diseases in livestock, develop vaccines and improve animal health and production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pound was a "microscopist" who trained in London in microscopy, physiology and bacteriology and at the Pasteur Institute in Paris in developing vaccines, then a new technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • outbreak
  • A waterborne disease outbreak occurs when two or more persons experience a similar illness after consumption or use of water intended for drinking and epidemiologic evidence implicates the water as the source of illness. (cdc.gov)
  • Representatives from CDC and EPA review and summarize outbreak data and also work together to investigate and evaluate waterborne disease outbreaks. (cdc.gov)
  • parasite
  • Significant reductions in the parasite load in liver, spleen, bone marrow and draining lymph nodes were found in these animals. (cambridge.org)
  • Green Turtle (Chelonia mydas) (n = 6) neurological disease due to the coccidial parasite Caryospora cheloniae. (agriculture.gov.au)
  • After trypanosomes, Babesia is thought to be the second-most common blood parasite of mammals, and they can have a major impact on health of domestic animals in areas without severe winters. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it often carries a protozoan parasite Histomonas meleagridis which causes of histomoniasis (blackhead disease). (wikipedia.org)
  • spread
  • An increase in the number of large rabbitries, combined with expanded trading in France, Spain and Italy, fostered the appearance and simultaneous spread throughout these three countries of three hitherto sporadic diseases: dermatomycosis, staphylococcis and colibacilli O103. (fao.org)
  • The Yeerongpilly site was more suitable than other sites considered as it was bounded on the north by the river, on the south by the railway line, leaving only narrow frontages on the east and west to adjoining land and public roads, thereby reducing the danger that disease could spread. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike E. granulosus, E. multilocularis produces many small cysts (also referred to as locules) that spread throughout the internal organs of the infected animal. (wikipedia.org)
  • however, are still able to spread the disease to others. (wikipedia.org)
  • eggs
  • Their eggs are found to live for years in soil making it difficult to eliminate H. gallinarum from a domestic flock. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eggs ingested by rodents develop in the liver, lungs and other organs to form multilocular cysts. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • In addition to waterborne disease outbreaks associated with water intended for drinking, the Water-Related Disease Surveillance Report cites reports of 1) outbreaks of illness associated with exposure to recreational water and 2) epidemiologic investigation of gastroenteritis outbreaks on ocean-going passenger vessels that call at U.S. ports. (cdc.gov)
  • Changes of human habitation to suburban areas, increased use of lands for agricultural purposes, increased hunting activities and consumption of wild boar meat have increased the chances of exposure of wild boars to domestic animals and humans. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • adult
  • The nymph feeds and repeats the same process as the larva, but will emerge having developed the anatomy of either an adult female or male. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • In addition, the Health Effects Research Laboratory of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) contacts all state water-supply agencies annually to obtain information about waterborne disease outbreaks. (cdc.gov)
  • Animal Research Institute Buildings is a heritage-listed set of research station buildings at 681 Fairfield Road, Yeerongpilly, City of Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also known as Stock Experiment Station (1909-1932) and Animal Research Station (1932-1953). (wikipedia.org)
  • The former Animal Research Institute at Yeerongpilly was established by the Department of Agriculture and Stock in 1909 as the Stock Experiment Station. (wikipedia.org)
  • At his suggestion, the Department acquired 23 hectares of land at Yeerongpilly for an experimental station capable of accommodating the animals needed for research and sufficient for grass and crops to make the farm self-supporting in fodder. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • This problem is exacerbated if the transported microbe passed on to others causes a new disease, as happened with HIV & AIDS, which have only been with us on a large enough scale to atract attention for the last 20 years. (animalresearch.info)
  • known
  • The diagram shows what is known as biological transmission (= developmental transmission) because it is necessary for the transmitted organism to develop in the fly to the state where the organism is at an infective stage of its life cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Table 1 lists the viruses that are known to be prevalent in wild boars with potential for transmission to domestic animals and humans. (royalsocietypublishing.org)