• Tritium
  • Recent scientific and technical progress in magnetic fusion experiments has resulted in the achievement of plasma parameters (density and temperature) which enabled the production of significant bursts of fusion power from deuterium-tritium fuels and the first studies of the physics of burning plasmas. (unt.edu)
  • A review of the technical and scientific results from the deuterium-tritium experiments on the Joint European Torus (JET) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is given with particular emphasis on alpha-particle physics issues. (unt.edu)
  • These include fusion with another deuterium nucleus to form helium-3, tritium, or (more rarely) helium-4, or with helium to form various isotopes of lithium. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, in 1994, PPPL's Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) produced a world-record 10.7 megawatts of fusion power from a plasma composed of equal parts of deuterium and tritium, a fuel mix likely to be used in commercial fusion power reactors. (wikipedia.org)
  • ITER), burning deuterium-tritium fuel. (wikipedia.org)
  • ratio
  • First, by observing numerous stars in the region directly around the sun (within 100 parsecs or about 325 light years), FUSE observations have very strongly confirmed that the ratio of deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) is constant, at a value of about 15 parts per million (ppm) of D relative to H. Researchers have been working toward confirming this idea and quantifying the local value of D/H for decades! (stsci.edu)
  • The different values of the deuterium-to-hydrogen ratio (D/H) in water observed in various bodies in the Solar System. (esa.int)
  • The ratio of deuterium to hydrogen in water is a key diagnostic to determining where in the Solar System an object originated and in what proportion asteroids and/or comets contributed to Earth's oceans. (esa.int)
  • Nearly all deuterium found in nature was produced in the Big Bang 13.8 billion years ago, as the basic or primordial ratio of hydrogen-1 to deuterium (about 26 atoms of deuterium per million hydrogen atoms) has its origin from that time. (wikipedia.org)
  • compounds
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide pharmaceutical compositions comprising a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier and a therapeutically effective amount of at least one of the deuterium-enriched compounds of the presentinvention or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. (patentgenius.com)
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a method for treating a disease selected from prophylaxis, Influenzavirus A, and Influenzavirus B, comprising administering to a host in need of such treatment a therapeutically effectiveamount of at least one of the deuterium-enriched compounds of the present invention or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. (patentgenius.com)
  • increasingly
  • Although deuterium labelling is increasingly being used, the interpretation of the data in terms of the underlying kinetics of the cells has turned out to be notoriously difficult [ 1 , 8 , 10 , 16 - 18 ]. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • water
  • Scientists in China reported a less expensive, more eco-friendly method for making large quantities of deuterium depleted drinking water. (medindia.net)
  • Deuterium-depleted water may be more healthier form of water. (medindia.net)
  • Deuterium-depleted water usually contains about 125 ppm. (medindia.net)
  • They cite accumulating evidence that water with high levels of deuterium may have adverse health effects on animals and plants, while deuterium-depleted water may be useful in treatment of certain diseases. (medindia.net)
  • Existing ways of removing deuterium from water tend to be expensive, inefficient, or environmentally harmful. (medindia.net)
  • They describe a new method that helps overcome these problems, and could be the basis for the first industrial-scale production of deuterium-depleted water. (medindia.net)
  • Soon after deuterium's discovery, Urey and others produced samples of "heavy water" in which the deuterium content had been highly concentrated. (wikipedia.org)
  • The by-product of this process is deuterium-depleted water. (wikipedia.org)
  • mass
  • After deuterium labelling, one sorts the cell population of interest, isolates the DNA from the cells, and uses mass spectrometry to determine the enrichment of deuterium in the DNA [ 12 - 15 ]. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • If there was no deuterium fusion, there would be no stars with masses more than about two or three times the mass of the Sun in the pre-main-sequence phase as the more intense hydrogen fusion would occur and prevent the object from accreting matter. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mass threshold for the onset of deuterium fusion atop the solid cores is also at roughly 13 Jupiter masses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bang
  • Interestingly, astronomers think that the only significant source of the deuterium isotope was the Big Bang itself. (stsci.edu)
  • Understanding how much deuterium was created in the Big Bang and how much has been destroyed over time, are two of the Holy Grails of modern astrophysics. (stsci.edu)
  • small
  • Deuterium NMR spectra are especially informative in the solid state because of its relatively small quadrupole moment in comparison with those of bigger quadrupolar nuclei such as chlorine-35, for example. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • Due to the high intensity of UV radiation emitted by the bulb, eye protection is suggested when using a deuterium bulb. (wikipedia.org)
  • another
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide a novel deuterium-enriched oseltamivir or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof for use in therapy. (patentgenius.com)
  • It is another object of the present invention to provide the use of a novel deuterium-enriched oseltamivir or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof for the manufacture of a medicament (e.g., for the treatment of prophylaxis, InfluenzavirusA, and Influenzavirus B). (patentgenius.com)
  • provide
  • Accordingly, one object of the present invention is to provide deuterium-enriched oseltamivir or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof. (patentgenius.com)