• fetus
  • 2) "Clone or attempt to clone a human being" means to implant in a uterus or attempt to implant in a uterus anything other than the product of fertilization of an egg of a human female by a sperm of a human male for the purpose of initiating a pregnancy that could result in the creation of a human fetus, or the birth of a human being. (chipbennett.net)
  • For the purpose of this report, generating an individual animal or person that derives its nuclear genes from a diploid cell taken from an embryo, fetus, or born individual of the same species. (chipbennett.net)
  • Scientists would allow the embryo/fetus to reach a certain stage of development - maybe four to five months or later -- and then pluck out a kidney or a heart or brain tissue, knowing that the developing human child will be destroyed in the process. (missourilife.org)
  • Research is advancing rapidly in perfecting an artificial womb with predictions of a fully-functioning artificial womb capable of gestating a human fetus being available in five to ten years. (missourilife.org)
  • Advocates generally argue that human life begins at conception and that the human zygote (or embryo or fetus) is a person and therefore has a right to life. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • The appeals court overturned a ruling by a federal judge who found that the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) guidelines on such research violated the law because embryos were destroyed and it put other researchers working with adult stem cells at a disadvantage to win federal grants. (reuters.com)
  • The researchers, Dr. James Sherley, a biological engineer at Boston Biomedical Research Institute, and Theresa Deisher, of Washington-based AVM Biotechnology, could appeal the ruling to the full appeals court, a lawyer involved in the case said. (reuters.com)
  • In June 2005, Dr. Robert Lanza and other researchers at Advanced Cell Technology in Massachusetts published a paper reporting that they created cloned cow embryos, implanted them into a cow, and grew them in utero to four months gestation. (missourilife.org)
  • Researchers have already developed artificial womb-like environments to grow animal embryos into fetuses. (missourilife.org)
  • At this time researchers are still uncertain of what clinical differences may exist between iPS cells and embryonic stem cells, meaning that, at this time, further research on both kinds of stem cells is necessary to fully understand the medical potential of these new discoveries. (spusa.org)
  • The hope is that by using hybrid embryos, researchers can hone the techniques they need for research that requires human embryos, such as growing viable lines of stem cells. (theregister.co.uk)
  • fetuses
  • This amendment, which has been added to all subsequent appropriations bills including the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009 in substantially the same form, prohibits the use of any of the funds so appropriated for 'research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed, discarded, or knowingly subjected to risk of injury or death greater than that allowed for research on fetuses in utero. (lexology.com)
  • or (2) research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed, discarded, or knowingly subjected to risk of injury or death greater than that allowed for research on fetuses in utero under 45 CFR 46.208(a)(2) and Section 498(b) of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 289g(b)) (Title 42, Section 289g(b), United States Code). (wikipedia.org)
  • or (2) research in which a human embryo or embryos are destroyed, discarded, or knowingly subjected to risk of injury or death greater than that allowed for research on fetuses in utero under" applicable federal regulations. (cbc-network.org)
  • These discoveries sparked extensive debate in the United States Congress, with opponents of the use of embryonic stem cells from fetuses arguing that these or similar methods of creating stem cells from skin might be eventually used instead to satisfy the conflicting demands of medical research and morals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The second bill makes it illegal to create, grow, and abort fetuses for research purposes. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • Throughout the ESCR debate, proponents of federal funding have corrupted science by claiming falsely that an embryo in a dish is not really an embryo, meaning not a human organism. (cbc-network.org)
  • For many decades, stem cells have played an important role in medical research, beginning in 1868 when Ernst Haeckel first used the phrase to describe the fertilized egg which eventually gestates into an organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001
  • The competing Greenwood "Cloning Prohibition Act of 2001" prohibits only the creation of a cloned child. (jewishworldreview.com)
  • Greenwood, he says correctly, should really be called the "Human Embryo Cloning Registration and Industry Facilitation and Protection Act of 2001. (jewishworldreview.com)
  • After the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Bush declared a global war on terrorism and, in October 2001, ordered an invasion of Afghanistan to overthrow the Taliban, destroy the terrorist group al-Qaeda, and capture Osama bin Laden. (wikipedia.org)
  • uterus
  • Women undergoing IVF typically choose to transfer to their uterus embryos with the highest likelihood of implantation and, eventually, healthy birth. (aappublications.org)
  • eggs
  • Chimeras are formed from at least four parent cells (two fertilised eggs or early embryos fused together). (wikipedia.org)
  • injunction
  • We have discussed the injunction issued by Judge Royce C. Lamberth against President Obama's ESCR funding policy - and the mendacious legislative response of the likes of Arlen Specter that would authorize the Feds to fund cloning research in addition to restoring Obama's more limited policy. (cbc-network.org)
  • Scientists
  • You are about to enter a brave new world envisioned by scientists in which human embryos will be allowed to develop indefinitely in artificial wombs to serve as organ and tissue 'farms. (missourilife.org)
  • If scientists allow the embryo to develop in the natural state in a mother's womb or an artificial womb environment, the cells mature and become - adult! (missourilife.org)
  • I have watched scientists tell legislators that embryos aren't human organisms, but a mere "ball of cells" or a "fertilized egg," everything but chopped liver. (cbc-network.org)
  • The discovery of adult stem cells led scientists to develop an interest in the role of embryonic stem cells, and in separate studies in 1981 Gail Martin and Martin Evans derived pluripotent stem cells from the embryos of mice for the first time. (wikipedia.org)
  • moral
  • Enough time to regain our moral equilibrium -- and the recognition that the human embryo, cloned or not, is not to be created for the sole purpose of being poked and prodded, strip-mined for parts and then destroyed. (jewishworldreview.com)
  • Others are concerned about the moral implications of research on any embryos at all: that the proposed research subjects are part animal, part human just compounds an already untenable position. (theregister.co.uk)
  • When looked at scientifically, outside of a fictional and/or mythical context, the real-life creation of human-animal hybrids has served as a subject of legal, moral, and technological debate in the context of recent advances in genetic engineering. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the use of the technique on human embryos led to more widespread controversy as criticism of the technique now began from the wider non-scientific public who debated the moral ethics of questions concerning research involving human embryonic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • derivation
  • Judge Douglas Ginsburg, appointed by President Ronald Reagan, wrote that it was "entirely reasonable" for the NIH to interpret the law as "permitting funding for research using cell lines derived without federal funding, even as it bars funding for the derivation of additional lines. (reuters.com)
  • Had Congress intended to limit the Dickey-Wicker to only those discrete acts that result in the destruction of an embryo, like the derivation of ESCs, or to research on the embryo itself, Congress could have written the statute that way. (cbc-network.org)
  • Daleks
  • At the end of this serial, the Daleks are seemingly wiped out when their power source is destroyed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Daleks here plan to destroy the Earth's magnetic core and pilot the planet. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Doctor activates the Time Destructor and the Daleks are destroyed, though his companion Sara Kingdom is turned to dust. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the Doctor turns the power source against the Daleks and apparently destroys them. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the serial, the Fourth Doctor (Tom Baker) and his companions Sarah Jane Smith (Elisabeth Sladen) and Harry Sullivan (Ian Marter) are travelling back to the space station via transmat beam from a previous story to return to the TARDIS, when they are intercepted by the Doctor's race, the Time Lords, and are directed to Skaro at the time of the Daleks' creation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dickey-Wicker Amendment
  • 2009).) Indeed, the Dickey-Wicker Amendment does not contain any language to support such a limited definition of research. (cbc-network.org)
  • At this point, the Congress intervened and passed the Dickey-Wicker Amendment in 1995 (the final bill, which included the Dickey Amendment, was signed into law by Bill Clinton) which prohibited any federal funding for the Department of Health and Human Services be used for research that resulted in the destruction of an embryo regardless of the source of that embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethical
  • From its inception, however, it has raised ethical concerns based not on the use of stem cells themselves but on objections to the source of the cells-specifically, the destruction of preimplantation human embryos. (aappublications.org)
  • But it hopes the ethical and scientific questions about when and how embryos are used will be determined by a parliamentary committee that begins hearings this fall, Health Minister Allan Rock's spokesman said in late July. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Research utilizing cybrids has been hotly contested due to the ethical implications of further cybrid research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Amendment
  • In 1987, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in case of Edwards v. Aguillard that to require the teaching of 'creation science' alongside evolution violated the First Amendment by promoting religion. (foxnews.com)
  • therapeutic
  • Therapeutic cloning would involve cloning cells from a human for use in medicine and transplants, and is an active area of research, but is not in medical practice anywhere in the world, as of April 2017[update]. (wikipedia.org)
  • parliamentary
  • Last month, the parliamentary committee set up to examine the Bill gave its approval , recommending that the government relax the current ban on creating hybrid embryos. (theregister.co.uk)
  • transplantation
  • The embryos used in the Korean research, made through a technique called somatic cell nuclear transplantation, were destroyed after the stem cells were extracted. (sfgate.com)
  • Eggan's research goals at Harvard were to understand how nuclear transplantation works, and to make stem cells that carry genes for specific diseases such as Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease), and Alzheimer's. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetically
  • The creation of one or more genetically identical animals by transferring the nucleus of a body cell into an egg from which the nucleus has been removed. (chipbennett.net)
  • implantation
  • In addition, hESCs may be generated from embryos with arrested 9 or otherwise abnormal growth that would render them unsuitable for implantation. (aappublications.org)
  • But some science organizations have changed the definition of the embryo to require implantation. (cbc-network.org)
  • Pre-implantation embryos at this stage of development are called blastocysts, hollow microscopic balls of cells. (spusa.org)
  • newborn
  • The New Jersey legislature, with an enormous push from the biotech industry, has enacted a law that specifically authorizes and encourages human cloning for fetal farming by allowing human clones to be developed through the 'embryo, fetal and newborn stages into a new human individual. (missourilife.org)
  • federal
  • But I have made it very clear to the Congress that the use of federal money, taxpayers' money, to promote science which destroys life in order to save life is -- I'm against that. (sfgate.com)
  • With certain restrictions, the President has announced that federal funds may be used to conduct research on human embryonic stem cells. (unt.edu)
  • His decision was put on hold pending appeal so federal money continued to flow after the White House warned research costing millions of dollars would be lost if halted. (reuters.com)
  • Shortly after taking office in 2009, President Barack Obama expanded federal funding for research involving human embryonic stem cells in hopes it would lead to cures for diseases. (reuters.com)
  • They argued that they were at risk of being squeezed out of federal grants for their own work with adult stem cells, which do not involve the destruction of embryos. (reuters.com)
  • The current federal policy, as described in National Security Decision Directive 189, is that fundamental research should remain unrestricted and that in the rare case where it is necessary to restrict such information, classification is the appropriate vehicle to do so. (unt.edu)
  • While the federal government continues to be the primary supporter of university based research and development (R&D), the financial composition of support for university-based research has changed considerably over the past 31 years. (unt.edu)
  • The ban was on the use of federal funds to aid such research. (lexology.com)
  • Many expect the next White House and Congress to reverse the ban on federal subsidies for ESC research. (medindia.net)
  • Federal concern with human embryo research began over 25 years ago with the advent of assisted reproduction technologies, i.e. in vitro fertilization (IVF) or "test tube babies. (wikipedia.org)
  • These developments prompted the federal government to create regulations barring the use of federal funds for research that experimented on human embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • lines
  • There is some recent evidence that hESC lines can be generated from 1 to 2 cells obtained by a biopsy procedure that does not require destruction of the embryo, but this procedure has not obviated the need to continue to derive stem cells in the traditional manner, which results in the destruction of an embryo. (aappublications.org)