• hygiene
  • During the experiment individuals used AX mouthwash twice daily in absence of other oral hygiene measures. (frontiersin.org)
  • 1965) 13 in an experimental gingivitis study on dental students who were restrained from all oral hygiene measures for a period of three weeks. (periobasics.com)
  • If oral hygiene is not maintained properly all will suffer from bad breath. (thehealthsuccesssite.com)
  • If oral hygiene is not maintained properly the mouth becomes the seat for millions of bacteria which produce offenssive gases by degrading the food debris. (thehealthsuccesssite.com)
  • Caries are common in schoolgoing children and in those who donot maintain proper oral hygiene .Calcium and vitamin deficiency can also predispose caries. (thehealthsuccesssite.com)
  • Major risk factors: Smoking, lack of oral hygiene with inadequate plaque biofilm control. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is professional agreement among dentists that smoking cessation and good oral hygiene are key to effective treatment and positive outcomes for patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Periodontal diseases include gingivitis (in which the inflammation is confined to the gingiva, and is reversible with good oral hygiene) and periodontitis (in which the inflammation extends and results in tissue destruction and alveolar bone resorption). (springer.com)
  • surfaces
  • Dental plaque is a biofilm or mass of bacteria that grows on surfaces within the mouth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dental plaque is a biofilm that attaches to tooth surfaces, restorations and prosthetic appliances (including dentures and bridges) if left undisturbed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both of these diseases originate from dental plaque, a complex mixture of numerous different bacteria that accumulates on tooth surfaces between cleaning procedures. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Biofilm formation on artificial surfaces that are placed in the body is particularly problematic since, unlike our own tissues, the artificial surfaces do not contain protective mechanisms to limit microbial colonisation. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • Plaque is a biofilm on the surfaces of the teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to WHO (1978), dental plaque is defined as a specific but highly variable structural entity resulting from sequential colonization and growth of micro-organisms on the surfaces of teeth and restoration consisting of micro organisms of various strains and species are embedded in the extra cellular matrix, composed of bacterial metabolic products and substance from serum, saliva and blood. (periobasics.com)
  • The bacterial biofilm on the implant surfaces is similar to the one in periodontal disease. (hindawi.com)
  • Cleaning the surfaces can be through mechanical (dental curettes, ultrasonic scalers, and air-powder abrasive) and chemical (citric acid, H 2 O 2 , chlorhexidine digluconate, and EDTA) procedures, in association with local or systemic antibiotics [ 8 , 9 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Tooth-associated communities were distinct, but not entirely dissimilar, from other oral surfaces. (biomedcentral.com)
  • saliva
  • by direct tiss extension and aspiration of saliva/oral fluids w/ org. (brainscape.com)
  • Stimulated saliva samples were collected from 10 patients with periodontitis, 10 patients with dental caries and 10 orally healthy individuals. (peerj.com)
  • Collectively, these reports conclude that biomarkers of different biological origin may be adequately assessed in saliva samples and support the concept that the biological composition of saliva reflects individual oral health status. (peerj.com)
  • interdental
  • Plaque control and removal can be achieved with correct daily or twice-daily tooth brushing and use of interdental aids such as dental floss and interdental brushes. (wikipedia.org)
  • In oral health, the interdental spaces are a real ecological niche for which the body has few or no alternative defenses and where the traditional daily methods for control by disrupting biofilm are not adequate. (frontiersin.org)
  • The interdental spaces are the source of many hypotheses regarding their potential associations with and/or causes of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, degenerative disease, and depression. (frontiersin.org)
  • P. gingivalis was detected in 19% of healthy subjects and represents 0.02% of the interdental biofilm. (frontiersin.org)
  • T. forsythensis and T. denticola (0.02 and 0.04% of the interdental biofilm) were detected in 93 and 49% of healthy subjects, respectively. (frontiersin.org)
  • Of all of the parts of the human body, the interdental (ID) space is a unique place, a real ecological niche, for which the body has few or no alternative defenses and where the traditional daily methods for control by disrupting biofilm are not adequate. (frontiersin.org)
  • gingivitis
  • If not taken care of, via brushing or flossing, the plaque can turn into tartar (its hardened form) and lead to gingivitis or periodontal disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms may include the following: Redness or bleeding of gums while brushing teeth, using dental floss or biting into hard food (e.g. apples) (though this may occur even in gingivitis, where there is no attachment loss) Gum swelling that recurs Halitosis, or bad breath, and a persistent metallic taste in the mouth Gingival recession, resulting in apparent lengthening of teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • microbiota
  • Anti-plaque agents should not eradicate the oral microbiota. (frontiersin.org)
  • Those that are expected to be present, and that under normal circumstances do not cause disease, are sometimes deemed normal flora or normal microbiota. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, research has correlated poor oral heath and the resulting ability of the oral microbiota to invade the body to affect cardiac health as well as cognitive function. (wikipedia.org)
  • The composition of the salivary microbiota has been reported to differentiate between patients with periodontitis, dental caries and orally healthy individuals. (peerj.com)
  • Similar bacterial proteomes in healthy and diseased individuals suggests that the salivary microbiota predominantly thrives in a planktonic state expressing no disease-associated characteristics of metabolic activity. (peerj.com)
  • pathogen
  • The red complex, which is recognized as the most important pathogen in adult periodontal disease, represents 8.08% of the 19 bacteria analyzed. (frontiersin.org)
  • Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is considered an oral pathogen due to its virulence factors, its association with localized aggressive periodontitis in young adolescents, and studies indicating that it can cause bone loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • Henderson B, Nair SP, Ward JM, Wilson M. Molecular pathogenicity of the oral opportunistic pathogen Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. (innovareacademics.in)
  • systemic
  • The disease may be modified by and be associated with systemic diseases (e.g. diabetes mellitus, HIV infection) It can also be modified by factors other than systemic disease such as smoking and emotional stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • These data provide a critical baseline for future studies investigating local and systemic diseases affecting human health. (biomedcentral.com)
  • phases
  • Below is a summary of the bacteria that may be present during the phases of plaque maturation: Early biofilm: primarily Gram-positive cocci Older biofilm (3-4 days): increased numbers of filaments and fusiforms 4-9 days undisturbed: more complex flora with rods, filamentous forms 7-14 days: Vibrio species, spirochetes, more Gram-negative organisms Dental plaque is considered a biofilm adhered to the tooth surface. (wikipedia.org)