• Soil
  • Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) play different roles in plant Zn nutrition depending on whether the soil is Zn-deficient (AM enhancement of plant Zn uptake) or Zn-toxic (AM protection of plant from excessive Zn uptake). (springer.com)
  • We undertook a glasshouse experiment to study the interactive effects of P and Zn on AM colonisation, plant growth and nutrition, focusing on the two extremes of soil Zn concentration-deficient and toxic. (springer.com)
  • Bi YL, Li XL, Christie P (2003) Influence of early stages of arbuscular mycorrhiza on uptake of zinc and phosphorus by red clover from a low-phosphorus soil amended with zinc and phosphorus. (springer.com)
  • Cavagnaro TR (2008) The role of arbuscular mycorrhizas in improving plant zinc nutrition under low soil zinc concentrations: a review. (springer.com)
  • To evaluate the physiological responses of wheat to zinc (Zn) fertilizer application under drought stress, pot, and field experiments were conducted on wheat plants grown under different soil moistures and treated with soil and foliar Zn applications. (frontiersin.org)
  • Increasing the amount of zinc in the soil and thus in crops and animals is an effective preventive measure. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can be brought about by a combination of factors including: a specific mineral deficiency in the soil, such as iron, magnesium or zinc deficient nitrogen and/or proteins a soil pH at which minerals become unavailable for absorption by the roots poor drainage (waterlogged roots) damaged and/or compacted roots pesticides and particularly herbicides may cause chlorosis, both to target weeds and occasionally to the crop being treated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Soil contains zinc in 5-770 ppm with an average 64 ppm. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentrations
  • Therefore, it is advisable to obtain baseline measurement of the serum zinc and total cholesterol concentrations in maintenance HD patients. (ac.ir)
  • some soils (sandy soils, histosols and soils developed from highly weathered parent material) have low total zinc concentrations, and others have low plant-available zinc due to strong zinc sorption (calcareous soils, highly weathered soils, vertisols, hydromorphic soils, saline soils). (wikipedia.org)
  • Although zinc requirements vary among crops, zinc leaf concentrations (on a dry matter basis) in the range 20 to 100 mg/kg are adequate for most crops. (wikipedia.org)
  • diets
  • Experts say as many as two billion people around the world have diets deficient in zinc - and studies at Oregon State University and elsewhere are raising concerns about the health implications this holds for infectious disease. (theheartysoul.com)
  • proteins
  • Zinc occurs in plants as a free ion, as a complex with a variety of low molecular weight compounds, or as a component of proteins and other macromolecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initial selection efforts utilized phage display to select proteins that bound a given DNA target from a large pool of partially randomized zinc-finger arrays. (wikipedia.org)
  • diarrhea
  • Zinc pills may help reduce diarrhea. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A PLoS Medicine study , which "followed a nationwide public health campaign to increase zinc use for childhood diarrhea in Bangladesh," confirmed that a 10-day course of zinc tablets is effective at treating diarrhea and also helps prevent future bouts of the condition. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Zinc deficiency contributes to an increased incidence and severity of diarrhea. (wikipedia.org)
  • plasma
  • These data show that plasma and erythrocyte trace element contents of G-6-PD-deficient subjects do not differ in normal conditions. (ovid.com)
  • Plasma zinc levels have been alleged to be associated with many psychological disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • organic
  • Soils low in organic matter (such as where topsoils have been removed), and compacted soils that restrict root proliferation also have a high risk of zinc deficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • Foliar applications of zinc as zinc sulphate or as zinc chelate (or other organic complexes) are also widely used, especially with fruit trees and grape vines. (wikipedia.org)
  • A variety of zinc compounds are commonly used, such as zinc carbonate and zinc gluconate (as dietary supplements), zinc chloride (in deodorants), zinc pyrithione (anti-dandruff shampoos), zinc sulfide (in luminescent paints), and zinc methyl or zinc diethyl in the organic laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • severity
  • In addition, a Cochrane review concluded that taking "zinc (lozenges or syrup) is beneficial in reducing the duration and severity of the common cold in healthy people, when taken within 24 hours of onset of symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Recommended applications of actual zinc range from 5 to 100 kg/hectare but optimum levels of zinc vary with plant type and the severity of the deficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • vitamin
  • Supplementing vitamin A with retinol to a deficient cat, and feeding a balanced diet to a cat with hypervitaminosis A will treat the underlying nutritional disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • The brain retains its thiamine content in the face of a vitamin-deficient diet with great tenacity, as it is the last of all nervous tissues studied to become depleted. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methods
  • Without methods to account for this "context dependence", the standard modular assembly procedure often fails unless it is used to recognize sequences of the form (GNN)N. Numerous selection methods have been used to generate zinc-finger arrays capable of targeting desired sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron
  • With the help of these studies, iron and zinc treatment instead of only iron replacement may be considered in cases of iron deficiency. (tjh.com.tr)
  • Corrosion-resistant zinc plating of iron (hot-dip galvanizing) is the major application for zinc. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • The most commonly used linker sequences between the zinc finger domain and the cleavage domain requires the 5' edge of each binding site to be separated by 5 to 7 bp. (wikipedia.org)
  • finger
  • Zinc finger nuclease mediated gene targeting of a single copy gp91 phox therapeutic minigene into one allele of the "safe harbor" AAVS1 locus in X-CGD iPSCs without off-target inserts resulted in sustained expression of gp91 phox and substantially restored neutrophil ROS production. (bloodjournal.org)
  • Our findings demonstrate how precise gene targeting may be applied to correction of X-CGD using zinc finger nuclease and patient iPSCs. (bloodjournal.org)
  • Zinc finger domains can be engineered to target specific desired DNA sequences and this enables zinc-finger nucleases to target unique sequences within complex genomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The DNA-binding domains of individual ZFNs typically contain between three and six individual zinc finger repeats and can each recognize between 9 and 18 basepairs. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the zinc finger domains perfectly recognize a 3 basepair DNA sequence to generate a 3-finger array that can recognize a 9 basepair target site. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other procedures can utilize either 1-finger or 2-finger modules to generate zinc-finger arrays with six or more individual zinc fingers. (wikipedia.org)
  • This system combines pre-selected pools of individual zinc fingers that were each selected to bind a given triplet and then utilizes a second round of selection to obtain 3-finger arrays capable of binding a desired 9-bp sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • This system was developed by the Zinc-Finger Consortium as an alternative to commercial sources of engineered zinc-finger arrays. (wikipedia.org)
  • see: Zinc finger chimera for more info on zinc finger selection techniques) The non-specific cleavage domain from the type IIs restriction endonuclease FokI is typically used as the cleavage domain in ZFNs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Standard ZFNs fuse the cleavage domain to the C-terminus of each zinc finger domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zinc finger nucleases have also been used in a mouse model of haemophilia and a clinical trial found CD4+ human T-cells with the CCR5 gene disrupted by zinc finger nucleases to be safe as a potential treatment for HIV/AIDS. (wikipedia.org)
  • essential
  • Zinc deficiency occurs when plant growth is limited because the plant cannot take up sufficient quantities of this essential micronutrient from its growing medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zinc is an essential micronutrient which means it is essential for plant growth and development, but is required in very small quantities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zinc plays an essential role in numerous biochemical pathways. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zinc is an essential mineral, including to prenatal and postnatal development. (wikipedia.org)
  • susceptible
  • A lack of zinc can make a person more susceptible to disease and illness. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A review of pregnancy outcomes in women with acrodermatitis enteropathica, reported that out of every seven pregnancies, there was one abortion and two malfunctions, suggesting the human fetus is also susceptible to the teratogenic effects of severe zinc deficiency. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • A cat will be deficient for many months prior to seeing clinical signs in the skin, after which the skin will become scaly, and greasy while the coat will become dull. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Zinc can also be supplied as a seed treatment, or by root-dipping of transplant seedlings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of zinc in the treatment of anorexia has been advocated since 1979 by Bakan. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 1994 trial showed that zinc doubled the rate of body mass increase in the treatment of anorexia nervosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Zinc lozenges were found to shorten the duration of common cold episodes by up to 40 percent in a study published in the Open Respiratory Medicine Journal . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The most common zinc ore is sphalerite (zinc blende), a zinc sulfide mineral. (wikipedia.org)
  • Zinc is a bluish-white, lustrous, diamagnetic metal, though most common commercial grades of the metal have a dull finish. (wikipedia.org)
  • result
  • All assays were performed under normal conditions free of any oxidative attack that may result in hemolytic crisis in G-6-PD-deficient subjects. (ovid.com)
  • role
  • Research conducted at the University of Toronto and published in the journal Neuron suggested that zinc has a crucial role in regulating how neurons communicate with one another, affecting how memories are formed and how we learn. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Zinc plays a role in maintaining skin integrity and structure. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • An increasing amount of evidence suggests that zinc deficiency could play a role in depression. (wikipedia.org)