• cardiac
  • Brain death-induced impairment of cardiac contractile performance can be reversed by explantation and may not preclude the use of hearts for transplantation. (ahajournals.org)
  • The shortage of suitable donor hearts for cardiac transplantation is exacerbated by the exclusion of those that exhibit contractile malfunction during the period after brain death but before excision. (ahajournals.org)
  • After 60 minutes of brain death (defined as the absence of electrical activity in the brain), a variety of indicators of cardiac contractile function fell by approximately 50% (thus cardiac index fell from 21 +/- 2 to 11 +/- 1 ml/min per 100 g body weight). (ahajournals.org)
  • However, once excised and perfused ex vivo, the hearts recovered a level of cardiac function that was identical to that from control animals that had not been subjected to brain death. (ahajournals.org)
  • brain
  • We have replicated the phenomenon of brain death-induced hemodynamic deterioration in the rat in vivo. (ahajournals.org)
  • Similarly, when hearts were excised, stored (6 hours at 4 degrees C), and reperfused ex vivo with blood, they also recovered a functional capability identical to that of normal hearts from animals that had not been subjected to brain death. (ahajournals.org)