• neuromuscular
  • In modern medicine, curare is classified as a neuromuscular blocking agent-it produces flaccidity in skeletal muscle by competing with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction (the site of chemical communication between a nerve fibre and a muscle cell). (britannica.com)
  • hence, competition at the neuromuscular junction by curare prevents nerve impulses from activating skeletal muscles. (britannica.com)
  • Patients with neuromuscular disorders such as myasthenia gravis , in which acetylcholine activity is already reduced, are highly sensitive to the effects of curare-like drugs. (britannica.com)
  • The use of curare or other neuromuscular blocking agents requires respiratory and ventilatory assistance by a qualified anesthetist or anesthesiologist. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In 1857, Claude Bernard (1813-1878) published the results of his experiments in which he demonstrated that the mechanism of action of curare was a result of interference in the conduction of nerve impulses from the motor nerve to the skeletal muscle, and that this interference occurred at the neuromuscular junction. (wikipedia.org)
  • After 25 years, he showed that acetylcholine is responsible for neuromuscular transmission, which can be blocked by curare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Curare acts as a neuromuscular blocking agent which induces flaccid paralysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Curare had been used as a source of arrow poison by South American natives to hunt animals, and they were able to eat the animals' contaminated flesh subsequently without any adverse effects because tubocurarine cannot easily cross mucous membranes.Thus, tubocurarine is effective only if given parenterally, as demonstrated by Bernard, who also showed that the site of its action was at the neuromuscular junction. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxic
  • main toxin is C-curarine I). Of these three types, some formulas belonging to the tube curare are the most toxic, relative to their LD50 values. (wikipedia.org)
  • Curare is active - toxic or muscle-relaxing, depending on the intended use - only by an injection or a direct wound contamination by poisoned dart or arrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • 4. The insoluble fraction of curare in liquid ammonia when treated with glycine becomes more potent, prolonged in action and less toxic than curare. (aspetjournals.org)
  • Johnson
  • The outstanding achievement of his career was the introduction of muscle relaxants to the practice of anaesthesia on January 23, 1942, when he and resident Enid Johnson used curare for the first time during anesthesia to produce muscle relaxation. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscle
  • This is a Biomedical Research, prospective, randomized, controlled single-blind mono centric, phase IV comparison trial of the bilateral TAP block versus curare in muscle relaxation of the abdominal wall during laparoscopic digestive surgery. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Among
  • Folk Medicine and Folk Therapeutic Principle among the Zeme Nagas of N. C. Hills in Assam (India) Curare: Journal of Ethnomedicine and Transcultural Psychiatry [Germany] Sole 2001, Vol. 24, No. 1 & 2, pages 161-164. (wikipedia.org)
  • certain
  • He conducted extensive studies on the actions of digitalis, muscarine (a product of certain mushrooms), choline and curare. (wikipedia.org)
  • animal
  • He was the first to show that curare does not kill the animal and the recovery is complete if the animal's respiration is maintained artificially. (wikipedia.org)
  • taken
  • It is harmless if taken orally because curare compounds are too large and highly charged to pass through the lining of the digestive tract to be absorbed into the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Price
  • From 1887, the Burroughs Wellcome catalogue listed under its 'Tabloids' brand name, tablets of curare at ​1⁄12 grain (price 8 shillings) for use in preparing a solution for hypodermic injection. (wikipedia.org)