• TAXONOMY
  • Using Cambarus we test the correspondence of subgeneric designations based on morphology used in traditional crayfish taxonomy to the underlying evolutionary history for these crayfish. (gwu.edu)
  • This suggests that morphological diagnoses based on traditional crayfish taxonomy might be confounded by convergent evolution across the cambarids and has little utility in diagnosing relationships or defining natural groups. (gwu.edu)
  • extant
  • In some specimens, dark areas formed of fluorapatite can be seen, which appear to represent soft tissue in a pattern congruent with the endophragmal skeleton of extant crayfishes. (wikipedia.org)
  • juvenile
  • After hatching from the eggs, juvenile crayfishes (looking alike the adults) will stay attached to the underside of the female's abdomen for several days, usually going through two or three molts as body size initially increases. (uky.edu)
  • After detaching from the female, juvenile crayfishes begin life as free-living individuals foraging for food, finding shelter, and growing to adult size. (uky.edu)
  • family
  • In Singapore, the term crayfish typically refers to Thenus orientalis, a seawater crustacean from the slipper lobster family. (wikipedia.org)
  • eggs
  • Crayfish begin their life as fertilized eggs attached to the underside of the female's abdomen from early March to late May. (uky.edu)
  • members
  • Like all of the creatures on this website (except for Slugs), Crayfish are members of the Phylum Arthropoda. (uky.edu)
  • further
  • In the Eastern United States, "crayfish" is more common in the north, while "crawdad" is heard more in central and southwestern regions, and "crawfish" further south, although there are considerable overlaps. (wikipedia.org)