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  • arteriosclerosis
  • Arteriosclerosis is characterized by thickening, loss of elasticity, and calcification of the arterial wall, most often resulting in a generalized narrowing in the affected coronary artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arteriosclerosis is the thickening, hardening and loss of elasticity of the walls of arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Monckeberg's arteriosclerosis or medial calcific sclerosis is seen mostly in the elderly, commonly in arteries of the extremities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hyperplastic: Hyperplastic arteriosclerosis refers to the type of arteriosclerosis that affects large and medium-sized arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hyaline type: Hyaline arteriosclerosis, also referred to as arterial hyalinosis and arteriolar hyalinosis, refers to lesions that are caused by the deposition of homogenous hyaline in the small arteries and arterioles. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1970 he published one of his best-known volumes, Surgical Treatment of Coronary Arteriosclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • revascularization
  • During this period of technological innovation, new published evidence, and updated guidelines, it is not well known whether or how the volume of coronary revascularization and its constituent types changed in the United States. (redorbit.com)
  • Andrew J. Epstein, Ph.D., of the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center and University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and colleagues conducted a study using a representative national sample of hospitalization claims to estimate trends in the annual volume of coronary revascularization procedures. (redorbit.com)
  • treatment
  • The location, the extent, and the number of obstructions in the arteries often dictate what is the most appropriate treatment for any particular individual. (ahajournals.org)
  • Thrombolytic therapy: is a treatment used to break up masses of plaque inside the arteries via intravenous clot-dissolving medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • myocardium
  • It is caused by the build-up of cholesterol deposits in the wall of the coronary arteries that convey the blood to the heart muscle (myocardium). (ahajournals.org)
  • These drugs work by increasing nitric oxide levels in the blood and inducing coronary vasodilation which will allow for more coronary blood flow due to a decreased coronary resistance, allowing for increased oxygen supply to the vital organs (myocardium). (wikipedia.org)
  • walls
  • The balloon is then inflated, pushing the deposits back against the arterial walls, and then a mesh tube is usually left behind to prevent the artery from retightening. (wikipedia.org)
  • internal
  • In one, the left internal thoracic artery (internal mammary artery) is diverted to the left anterior descending branch of the left coronary artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • aka Left internal thoracic artery, Left ITA) to bypass the left anterior descending artery (LAD), which is termed as Left IMA-LAD, as a preferable anastamosis whenever indicated and technically feasible (Loop et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • pump
  • The technique has a steep learning curve, but with adequate training and experience, the quality of the anastomoses has been shown to be similar to on-pump results in surgeons with comparable experience On February 18, 2012 Amano Atsushi performed a successful off-pump coronary artery bypass operation on Emperor Akihito. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgeons
  • The other one or two arteries will be stented, when appropriate, allowing cardiologists and cardiothoracic surgeons to work together. (wikipedia.org)
  • Congestive Heart F
  • There were also significant reductions in favor of atorvastatin 80 mg among the secondary endpoints, including major coronary events, cerebrovascular events, and hospitalization for congestive heart failure. (cheapmedicinechest.com)
  • Atherosclerosis
  • New Mouse Model of Vein Bypass Graft Atherosclerosis. (ebscohost.com)
  • Researchers now think that vulnerable plaque, (see atherosclerosis) is formed in the following way: Lipoprotein LDL particles, which carry fats (including the fat cholesterol made by every human cell) within the water/plasma portion of the blood stream, are absorbed into the artery wall, past the endothelium lining, some of the LDL-lipoprotein particles become oxidized and this attracts macrophages that eat the particles. (wikipedia.org)
  • She recognized the importance of her findings for treating arteries affected by atherosclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • unstable
  • A vulnerable plaque is a kind of atheromatous plaque - a collection of white blood cells (primarily macrophages) and lipids (including cholesterol) in the wall of an artery - that is particularly unstable and prone to produce sudden major problems such as a heart attack or stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • right atrium
  • Values are commonly obtained for the right atrium, right ventricle, pulmonary arteries, and for the pulmonary capillary "wedge" pressures, which approximate the pressure values of the left-sided heart chambers. (wikipedia.org)
  • enters
  • In an abnormal scan an area of the myocardium will turn grey slower than the surrounding tissue as the blood (and hence gadolinium) enters more slowly due to a narrowing of the coronary artery supplying it. (wikipedia.org)
  • induce
  • The cytokines induce the endothelial cells lining the artery wall to display adhesion molecules that attract immune-system white blood cells (to be specific, monocytes). (wikipedia.org)
  • Inflammation
  • When this inflammation is combined with other stresses, such as high blood pressure (increased mechanical stretching and contraction of the arteries with each heart beat), it can cause the thin covering over the plaque to split, spilling the contents of the vulnerable plaque into the bloodstream. (wikipedia.org)
  • wall
  • To be specific: oxidized lipoprotein particles in the artery wall are an irritant which causes the release of proteins (called cytokines) which attract monocyte white blood cells (white blood cells are the inflammatory cells within the body). (wikipedia.org)
  • The monocytes squeeze into the artery wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Campbell was the first to discover that cells of bone marrow origin contribute to intimal (the innermost coat of blood vessels) thickening in arteries subjected to injury, rather than solely from cells of the artery wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanical
  • Mechanical stretching and contraction of the artery, with each heart beat, i.e. the pulse, results in rupture of the thin covering membrane, spewing clot-promoting plaque contents into the blood stream. (wikipedia.org)