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  • corneal
  • It is characterized by changes in corneal collagen structure and organization which leads to progressive stretching and thinning of the cornea . (medcraveonline.com)
  • This treatment increases the stiffness of the cornea by causing the addition of new covalent bonds between and within the corneal collagen fibrils , subsequently improving the shape and refractive properties of the cornea. (medcraveonline.com)
  • Because the whorl-like characteristic pattern of the corneal subbasal nerve plexus is in the inferocentral cornea, we evaluated whether IVCM images of the whorl-like patterns can accurately evaluate the corneal nerve fibers in diabetic neuropathy. (arvojournals.org)
  • Forty-seven patients with diabetes (DM group) and 21 healthy control subjects underwent IVCM examination to compare the characteristics of the corneal subbasal nerve plexus around the central cornea (conventional method) and the whorl-like pattern in the inferocentral cornea (study method). (arvojournals.org)
  • In vivo corneal confocal microscopy (IVCM), a novel noninvasive technique to obtain repeated images of the small nerve fibers that compose the corneal subbasal nerve plexus, 5 is now used to evaluate diabetic polyneuropathy because the cornea is the most richly innervated bodily tissue. (arvojournals.org)
  • endothelial
  • http://www.cornea.org/Learning-Center/Cornea-Transplants/Endothelial-Keratoplasty.aspx. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Although the 5-year results indicated no difference in the success rate of moderate-risk transplants according to donor age, results from the SMAS indicated that among the successful cases, there was a slight association between donor age and endothelial cell loss, with the cell loss after 5 years being slightly lower in corneas from younger donors (r adjusted for baseline endothelial cell density = -0.19, 95% confidence interval -0.29 to -0.08). (bioportfolio.com)
  • tissue
  • Well defined heat doses (temperature X time) were applied to normal rabbit corneas in an effort to determine thermal tolerance, and to examine the effects of heat on this tissue. (mendeley.com)
  • The transparent tissue that covers the surface of the eyes, the cornea, can be damaged by injury, infection, or inflammation, causing the eye to lose much of its ability to refract light and focus images on the retina. (technologyreview.com)
  • Transparency, avascularity, the presence of immature resident immune cells, and immunologic privilege makes the cornea a very special tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the anterior to posterior the layers of the human cornea are: Corneal epithelium: an exceedingly thin multicellular epithelial tissue layer (non-keratinized stratified squamous epithelium) of fast-growing and easily regenerated cells, kept moist with tears. (wikipedia.org)
  • collagen
  • The team then chemically cross-linked this collagen and let it harden in a mold in the shape of corneas, which they then implanted in place of the damaged cornea layers of 10 patients. (technologyreview.com)
  • Although the implants do not contain any live cells, they mimic the flexible scaffold material that makes up the bulk of the stroma, the thickest layer of the cornea, which is essentially a natural hydrogel consisting mostly of collagen. (technologyreview.com)
  • There are 2 theories of how transparency in the cornea comes about: The lattice arrangements of the collagen fibrils in the stroma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Greek
  • Medical terms related to the cornea often start with the prefix "kerat-" from the Greek word κέρας, horn. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Our cornea specialists offer the widest possible range of treatment options for each patient's unique conditions. (emoryhealthcare.org)
  • Can Appropriate Systemic Treatment Help Protect the Cornea in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis? (lww.com)
  • grows
  • Calocera cornea is a jelly fungus that grows on decaying wood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Niebla cornea is a fruticose lichen that grows along the fog regions of the Pacific Coast of North America from near Morro Bay, California to near Punta Santa Rosalillita in Baja California. (wikipedia.org)
  • type
  • It is possible to see widespread use of this type of engineered cornea in the next five years. (technologyreview.com)
  • Niebla cornea has also been confused with Vermilacinia laevigata, which has a different terpenoid chemistry, a different type of cortex, and lacks chondroid stands in the medulla. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Vision problems such as astigmatism or nearsightedness (myopia) are often caused by changes in the normal shape of the cornea. (webmd.com)
  • Health
  • cell density as an indicator of the health of the cornea and as a alternate outcome measure (in an optional Specular Microscopy Ancillary Study). (bioportfolio.com)
  • layers
  • May Griffith of Linköping University in Sweden and Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, along with colleagues, developed the implant for patients with damage to only the top layers of the cornea. (technologyreview.com)
  • In lampreys, the cornea is solely an extension of the sclera, and is separate from the skin above it, but in more advanced vertebrates it is always fused with the skin to form a single structure, albeit one composed of multiple layers. (wikipedia.org)
  • light
  • The cornea directs light rays into the eye and helps focus them on the light-sensitive retina at the back of the eye, providing sharp, clear vision. (webmd.com)
  • The cornea, with the anterior chamber and lens, refracts light, with the cornea accounting for approximately two-thirds of the eye's total optical power. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • They said my cornea was swollen and I had almost like little water bubbles blurring my vision. (medhelp.org)
  • Several
  • Several other research groups are working on artificial corneas made from materials that encourage cell growth and are less likely to be rejected. (technologyreview.com)
  • front
  • Cornea specialists at the Emory Eye Center utilize the latest techniques and advances in the field to treat simple and advanced problems caused by disease, genetic predisposition, injury or aging to the structures in the front regions of the eye. (emoryhealthcare.org)