• cell's
  • By 1959, he had simplified the solar cell's experiment to the point where it was performed by high school students across the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • absorb
  • Hydrocarbon solvents absorb only at short wavelengths and are thus preferred for photochemical experiments requiring high energy photons. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2018
  • PSEA will celebrate the 25th anniversary of the Junior Solar Sprint this year, with a return to Center City and the best, most exciting event yet on Saturday, May 19th, 2018. (phillysolar.org)
  • electrical power
  • Electrical power is produced when the concentrated light is converted to heat, which drives a heat engine (usually a steam turbine) connected to an electrical power generator. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cells
  • Before the invention of solar cells, nature developed its own way of capturing solar energy. (blogspot.com)
  • Solar cells are expensive to produce & install. (blogspot.com)
  • Utilizing photosynthesis, leaves are nature's own "solar cells. (blogspot.com)
  • The product is usually converted to malate, a simple organic compound, which is transported to the bundle-sheath cells surrounding a nearby vein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Daryl Muscott Chapin (21 July 1906 - 19 January 1995) was an American physicist, best known for co-inventing solar cells in 1954 during his work at Bell Labs alongside Calvin S. Fuller and Gerald Pearson. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prior to working on solar cells, he worked on magnetic materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Roofs have been found to be a suitable place for solar cells, as many people have discovered that they can collect energy directly from their homes this way. (wikipedia.org)
  • The theory of solar cells explains the process by which light energy in photons is converted into electric current when the photons strike a suitable semiconductor device. (wikipedia.org)
  • hydrogen
  • Kevin Sivula and his colleagues purposefully limited themselves to inexpensive materials and easily scalable production processes in order to enable an economically viable method for solar hydrogen production. (redorbit.com)
  • With a colleague form University of Geneva, he invented the photoelectrochemical (PEC) tandem solar cell, a technique for producing hydrogen directly from water. (redorbit.com)
  • Uno-X in partnership with NEL ASA plans to build 20 stations before 2020, including a station with on-site hydrogen production from excess solar energy, the first of its kind. (wikipedia.org)
  • Turkey UNIDO launched in May 2010 on behalf of the International Centre for Hydrogen Energy Technologies, a call for tender related to the supply and installation by the end of 2011 of a hydrogen production, storage and filling facility on the Golden Horn, in Istanbul. (wikipedia.org)
  • The biological hydrogen production with algae is a method of photobiological water splitting which is done in a closed photobioreactor based on the production of hydrogen as a solar fuel by algae. (wikipedia.org)
  • electron
  • But at the same time, they have an electron in a high energy orbital, and are thus more reducing. (wikipedia.org)
  • In her postdoctorate work, she used electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to study photochemical energy conversion in natural photosynthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • When a photon is absorbed, its energy is given to an electron in the crystal lattice. (wikipedia.org)
  • The energy given to the electron by the photon "excites" it into the conduction band where it is free to move around within the semiconductor. (wikipedia.org)
  • A photon only needs to have energy greater than that of the band gap in order to excite an electron from the valence band into the conduction band. (wikipedia.org)
  • temperature
  • Spin waves can evolve in electrically non-conducting materials given a specific temperature gradient and then be converted into electrical energy in an adjacent metallic layer. (solarthermalmagazine.com)
  • The specific problem to which the basic knowledge was applied, namely the actual operation of a hydride heat pump demonstrated that solar inputs at modest temperature can be used for space heating and air conditioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • photochemical
  • Photochemical paths access high energy intermediates that cannot be generated thermally, thereby overcoming large activation barriers in a short period of time, and allowing reactions otherwise inaccessible by thermal processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Photoexcitation is the first step in a photochemical process where the reactant is elevated to a state of higher energy, an excited state. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1993 to 1995 she was the Group Leader for the Photochemical Energy Sciences Group in the Chemistry Division. (wikipedia.org)
  • environmentally
  • This recently discovered principle allows to think of new ways to recover waste heat and can improve a great variety of processes to be more energy-efficient and environmentally sustainable. (solarthermalmagazine.com)
  • orbital
  • Current heating is due to the current solar warm cycle and orbital dynamics of the Earth. (hubpages.com)
  • Molecular sensitizers that meet this criterion often include a metal center, as the d-orbital splitting in organometallic species often falls within the energy range of far-UV and visible light. (wikipedia.org)
  • The excitation to a higher singlet state can be from HOMO to LUMO or to a higher orbital, so that singlet excitation states S1, S2, S3… at different energies are possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • These excited species, either S1 or T1, have a half empty low-energy orbital, and are consequently more oxidizing than the ground state. (wikipedia.org)
  • batteries
  • Speaking at Vox Media's Code Conference on Wednesday night, Musk said that the energy density of its batteries is increasing on the order of nearly 5% per year, which ends up being a "significant number" when added up over a number of years. (flipboard.com)
  • The batteries developed for the high demands of all-electric Mercedes-Benz cars are finding a new application as in-home energy storage units. (flipboard.com)
  • While working on power sources for remote telephone systems in humid areas such as the tropics, where dry cell batteries are unreliable, he investigated solar power as an energy source after considering alternatives like thermoelectric generators and small steam engines. (wikipedia.org)
  • power
  • A new skin patch that draws energy from your sweat can power a radio for two days. (mnn.com)
  • Wave power has the potential to supply 25 percent of the nation's energy. (mnn.com)
  • If you want to reduce your utility bills-and your carbon footprint-solar power could be the answer. (flipboard.com)
  • crops
  • Wind and solar are seen as pristine "clean" and "technological" whereas crops and forests are seen as dirty, wasteful, corporate, manipulative, etc. (blogspot.com)
  • water
  • A revolutionary "solar steam" technology can convert solar energy to steam - even from nearly frozen water. (treehugger.com)
  • The solutions we need will address a myriad of challenges, from energy to water to carbon. (asknature.org)
  • So much of the positive press about renewables focuses on the urban non-liquid technologies - wind and solar - while negative press focuses on rural liquid technology concerns - the ethanol food vs. fuel dilemma, farm subsidies, water consumption, the net energy balance debate, etc. (blogspot.com)
  • A natural resource may exist as a separate entity such as fresh water, and air, as well as a living organism such as a fish, or it may exist in an alternate form which must be processed to obtain the resource such as metal ores, oil, and most forms of energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • gasoline
  • The isobutanol produced would have an energy density close to gasoline. (wikipedia.org)
  • It would take about 25,000 square kilometre algal farming to produce biohydrogen equivalent to the energy provided by gasoline in the US alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecular
  • These transitions are usually summarized in a state energy diagram or Jablonski diagram, the paradigm of molecular photochemistry. (wikipedia.org)