• corneal
  • The present day art of ttingcorneal contact lenses, generally stated, consists `in selecting a lens made up-of an inner spherical surface (or toric surface) to best t the corneal curves of the eye at the apex o f the cornea and ,then examining -this tit -with iluorescein solution between the lens and theeye. (google.com)
  • Thus in a-n average corneal type contact lens of 410 rnm. (google.com)
  • In an attempt to solve the foregoing problems, it has been suggested in Butterfield U.S. Patent 2,544,246', granted March 6, 1951, that the corneal lens have an inner spherical central area and an outer marginal portion formed by a series of separate and discrete steps to introduce a parabolic fit. (google.com)
  • The result of this suggestion is to produce a surface of uncertain rate of change of curvature when these steps are blended Touhy Patent 2,510,438, ygranted June 6, 1950, discloses a corneal contact lens having a radius of curvature on its concave side slightly greater than the radius of curvature of the cornea with an increasing clearance at the marginal areas of the lens. (google.com)
  • The usual procedure in the art of fitting corneal contact lens is to use a lens of an average of 9.5 mm. diameterthe lenses usually vary from 9.0 to 10.5 mm. in diameter. (google.com)
  • The product was voluntarily recalled on May 25 at the request of the Food & Drug Administration in the wake of data collected and reviewed by the Centers for Disease Control linking the solution to a serious corneal infection known as Acanthamoeba keratitis. (schmidtandclark.com)