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  • benign
  • A 2003 Cochrane review found screening by breast self-examination is not associated with lower death rates among women who report performing breast self-examination and does, like other breast cancer screening methods, increase harms, in terms of increased numbers of benign lesions identified and an increased number of biopsies performed. (wikipedia.org)
  • suspicion
  • Over the last three decades, efforts have been made to improve PCa detection using prebiopsy imaging to locate targets of suspicion for guided biopsy rather than to rely on random sampling. (hindawi.com)
  • Once a doctor has reason to believe that a patient may have an intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, he or she can confirm that suspicion using one of a number of imaging techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • subsequent
  • Multiparametric-MRI (MP-MRI) has emerged as a promising instrument in identifying suspicious regions within the prostate that require special attention on subsequent biopsy. (hindawi.com)
  • diagnostic
  • Additionally, without target resampling of suspicious areas, the utility and diagnostic yield of 12-core biopsy diminish with additional random rebiopsy [ 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Anomalous values that lie outside the acceptable ranges in any of these subcategories confirm the presence of infection in the body and indicate that further diagnostic measures are necessary. (wikipedia.org)
  • adjacent
  • It is a low-cost, practical tool for live imaging during procedures in which the boundaries of the prostate and its adjacent structures must be visualized, including biopsies and brachytherapy. (hindawi.com)
  • cases
  • While renal biopsy is not indicated in all cases of haematuria, it may be performed in those with glomerular haematuria (blood that is thought to come from damage to the glomerulus) or when combined with features of progressive renal disease (e.g. increasing proteinuria, elevated blood pressure and kidney failure). (wikipedia.org)
  • mutation
  • Earlier, more aggressive, and more frequent screening is recommended for women at particularly high risk of developing breast cancer, such as those with a confirmed BRCA mutation, those who have previously had breast cancer, and those with a strong family history of breast and ovarian cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • apparently
  • Transplant kidney biopsy can be performed when nothing is apparently wrong with the transplant kidney for the purposes of surveillance for hidden disease (protocol transplant biopsy). (wikipedia.org)
  • done
  • It can be divided into six categories: Blood tests may be done prior to or in lieu of a biopsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • infection
  • The safety of renal biopsy is affected by the following conditions: bleeding diathesis uncontrolled severe high blood pressure uncooperative patient presence of a solitary native kidney azotemia or uraemia certain anatomical abnormalities of the kidney skin infection at the biopsy site medications that interfere with clotting (e.g. warfarin or heparin) pregnancy urinary tract infection obesity Like most invasive medical procedures, a renal biopsy is not without risk (see Complications). (wikipedia.org)
  • technique
  • The technology was first incorporated into biopsies via the in-bore technique, in which radiologists sample the prostate while the patient is undergoing MRI. (hindawi.com)
  • The biopsy technique used will largely depend on the tumor's size and location. (wikipedia.org)
  • taken
  • Biopsy of the transplanted kidney taken during the transplant operation is termed implantation transplant biopsy or post-perfusion transplant biopsy depending on the timing of the biopsy with respect to key stages of the operation. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • However, this strategy fails to detect an unacceptably high percentage of clinically significant cancers, leading researchers to develop new, innovative methods to improve the effectiveness of prostate biopsies. (hindawi.com)
  • Renal biopsy is usually reserved for patients with high or increasing levels of proteinuria, or for patients who have proteinuria along with other signs of renal dysfunction. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • When the transplanted kidney is not working properly, biopsy may be undertaken to identify the cause of dysfunction. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cause of acute kidney failure can usually be determined without kidney biopsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biopsy is performed in those instances where the cause is uncertain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cause is genetic, but there are also suspected environmental factors involved, including in one study an increased risk with the use of the herbicide 2,4-D. This risk was not confirmed in another study. (wikipedia.org)
  • piece
  • Abnormal findings on screening are further investigated by surgically removing a piece of the suspicious lumps (biopsy) to examine them under the microscope. (wikipedia.org)
  • reasons
  • The following are examples of the most common reasons for native kidney biopsy: Haematuria (or blood in the urine) can occur with a number of conditions that affect the kidneys and urinary tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Kidney biopsy is performed on selected patients with kidney disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transplant kidney biopsy is performed in the following circumstances: For surveillance of hidden disease involving the transplant kidney, so-called protocol renal biopsy undertaken at fixed intervals post-transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In these instances, biopsy is performed to exclude rejection, BK nephropathy, drug-toxicity or recurrence of the disease that caused kidney failure in the first place. (wikipedia.org)
  • presence
  • Blood tests may prove inconclusive and may not serve as enough evidence to confirm the presence of vertebral osteomyelitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • specimens
  • Responsibilities include evaluation of gynecologic and non-gynecologic specimens, participation in fine needle aspiration service and daily cytology sign-out with the cytology fellow, resident and staff cytopathologist. (bu.edu)
  • largely
  • Image guided biopsy and thoracoscopy have largely replaced blind biopsy due to their greater sensitivity and safety profile. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Wood can be largely credited with the popularization and acceptance of injection as a medical technique, as well as the widespread use and acceptance of the hypodermic needle. (wikipedia.org)
  • The basic technology of the hypodermic needle has stayed largely unchanged since the 19th century, but as the years progressed and medical and chemical knowledge improved, small refinements have been made to increase safety and efficacy, with needles being designed and tailored for very particular uses. (wikipedia.org)
  • primarily
  • Wood used hypodermic needles and syringes primarily for the application of localized, subcutaneous injection (localized anesthesia) and therefore was not as interested in precise dosages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical
  • A hypodermic needle (from Greek ὑπο- (under-), and δέρμα (skin)), one of a category of medical tools which enter the skin, called sharps, is a very thin, hollow tube with a sharp tip that contains a small opening at the pointed end. (wikipedia.org)
  • core
  • The cells can be removed as liquid (to perform a smear to look at the cell morphology) or they can be removed via a core biopsy (to maintain the architecture or relationship of the cells to each other and to the bone). (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • If you want peace of mind and eliminate the risk of malignancy, than an excisional biopsy by a general surgeon should be done. (healthtap.com)
  • report
  • Please e-mail Daphney Noel at the above e-mail address one to two weeks prior to the start of the rotation to confirm that you are to report on the first day of the elective to the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at 670 Albany Street Bio III 3rd Floor at 9:00 A.M. (bu.edu)
  • results
  • Needle aspiration of the right SI joint gave negative results on cytologic study, AFB staining, and bacterial and TB cultures. (docme.ru)
  • increase
  • Other treatments can be started if symptoms develop, or if there are signs that the cancer growth is accelerating (e.g., rapidly rising PSA, increase in Gleason score on repeat biopsy, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • less
  • Turek is the inventor of Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) Mapping, also known less formally as sperm mapping, testicular cartography, or "GPS for the testis. (wikipedia.org)