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  • design
  • Along with this is computer-assisted design/computer-assisted manufacturer (CAD-CAM). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • More specifically, the present methods and systems provide for interactive computer-aided design (CAD) in dental applications. (google.com.au)
  • According to one of many possible embodiments, an interactive dental computer-aided design (CAD) system includes a graphical user interface for displaying at least one three-dimensional (3D) image for viewing by an operator, an access interface for receiving input from the operator, and a prosthesis design module providing design tools for creating a virtual 3D model of a dental prosthesis responsive to operator input. (google.com.au)
  • mainframe
  • One of the earliest examples came in 1967, after riots in Detroit, when Philip Meyer of the Detroit Free Press used a mainframe computer to show that people who had attended college were equally likely to have rioted as were high school dropouts. (wikipedia.org)
  • CALL dates back to the 1960s, when it was first introduced on university mainframe computers. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Collectively this has become known as computer-assisted reporting, or CAR. (wikipedia.org)
  • Electronic dictionaries, either unilingual or bilingual, also known as dictorobotary Terminology databases, either on the host computer or accessible through the Internet, such as TERMIUM Plus or Grand dictionnaire terminologique from the Office québécois de la langue française Full-text search tools (or indexers), which allow the user to query already translated texts or reference documents of various kinds. (wikipedia.org)
  • data
  • 1979. Computer-assisted studies of chemical carcinogens-A heterogenous data set. (springer.com)
  • Computer-assisted reporting describes the use of computers to gather and analyze the data necessary to write news stories. (wikipedia.org)
  • Journalists have also created mailing lists to share ideas about CAR, including NICAR-L, CARR-L and JAGIS-L. Data-driven journalism Melisma Cox , The development of computer-assisted reporting Archived 2011-09-28 at the Wayback Machine. (wikipedia.org)
  • reification of data, increased pressure on researchers to focus on volume and breadth rather than on depth and meaning, time and energy spent learning to use computer packages, increased commercialism, and distraction from the real work of analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tissue
  • The contrasts of the 3D dataset (with its tens of millions of pixels) provide the detail of soft vs hard tissue structures, and thus allow a computer to differentiate, and visually separate for a human, the different tissues and structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • instruction
  • TESOL's Computer Assisted Language Learning Interest Section (CALLIS) defines issues and standards in the field of computer-mediated language instruction, promote research and development in the area of computer-based language learning, and disseminate information about CALL to English language educators worldwide. (tesol.org)
  • Intelligent Computer Assisted Language Instruction (ICALI) involves the application of computing technologies such as Natural language processing (NLP), Knowledge representation (KP), Automatic Speech Recognition (ASR), Neural networks, and Intelligent tutoring systems to the teaching and learning of second or foreign languages. (wikipedia.org)
  • language
  • At the TESOL Annual Convention & English Language Expo, CALLIS organizes a computer lab called the Electronic Village (EV). (tesol.org)
  • An editor through which documents from all actors are transiting The MediaWiki "history" on each page is a CAR tool Computer-assisted translation Language industry Translation memory CoquiWeb (still experimental CAR & CART tool). (wikipedia.org)
  • It also extends to the use of corpora and concordancers, interactive whiteboards, Computer-mediated communication (CMC), language learning in virtual worlds, and mobile-assisted language learning (MALL). (wikipedia.org)
  • content
  • You'll get easier access to your articles, collections, media, and all your other content, even if you close your browser or shut down your computer. (lww.com)
  • In 2001, computers had reached a critical mass in American newsrooms in terms of general computer use, online research, non-specialist content searching, and daily frequency of online use, showing that CAR has become ubiquitous in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • System
  • In response to this, WHO has developed a Model System for Computer-assisted Drug Registration (SIAMED) in consultation with several national drug regulatory authorities. (who.int)
  • This is to be achieved through the provision of technical advice, an inexpensive, specifically designed and locally adaptable computer system, and further technical assistance as required. (who.int)
  • The first example of this type may have been Clarence Jones of The Miami Herald, who in 1969 worked with a computer to find patterns in the criminal justice system. (wikipedia.org)
  • For the generation of this model, the anatomical region to be operated has to be scanned and uploaded into the computer system. (wikipedia.org)
  • development
  • 1971 - Harvard Law School and The University of Minnesota Law School begin collaborating on the development of computer-based exercises for use in law school curriculum and in the development of a computer network for sharing these exercises. (wikipedia.org)
  • survey
  • Assessing the Influence of Computer-Assisted Legal Research: A Study of California Supreme Court Opinions Kate Marquess, Caught in the Web: Survey Reveals Increasing Use of Internet in Law Practices, but Lawyers Are Making Transition Slowly, A.B.A. J., Dec. 2000, at 76. (wikipedia.org)
  • Screen
  • Another example of computer-assisted gaming growing in popularity among role-playing game players is the use of a digital projector or flat screen monitors to present maps or other visual elements during game play. (wikipedia.org)
  • The size of the characters and other qualities of the computer user interface seem to demand more reading and computer screen experience than that possessed by many who might be competent readers of printed material. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Since these proofs are generally human-surveyable (albeit with difficulty, as with the proof of the Robbins conjecture) they do not share the controversial implications of computer-aided proofs-by-exhaustion. (wikipedia.org)
  • This approach of using a computer program to prove another program correct does not appeal to computer proof skeptics, who see it as adding another layer of complexity without addressing the perceived need for human understanding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulation of the game can be done completely by a computer or partly deferred to a human referee. (wikipedia.org)
  • In computer-assisted gaming, computers are used for recordkeeping and sometimes for the resolution of combat, but a Human referee makes any decisions requiring judgement. (wikipedia.org)
  • A computer-assisted game can be little more than a collection of rules and notes on computer, or as complete as a computer game, with a human referee needed only to make the non-random decisions. (wikipedia.org)
  • program
  • The idea is to use a computer program to perform lengthy computations, and to provide a proof that the result of these computations implies the given theorem. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1976, the four color theorem was the first major theorem to be verified using a computer program. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arguments that computer-assisted proofs are subject to errors in their source programs, compilers, and hardware can be resolved by providing a formal proof of correctness for the computer program (an approach which was successfully applied to the four-color theorem in 2005) as well as replicating the result using different programming languages, different compilers, and different computer hardware. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the last 15 years, journalism organizations such as the National Institute for Computer-Assisted Reporting (NICAR, a program of Investigative Reporters and Editors) and the Danish International Center for Analytical Reporting (DICAR), have been created solely to promote the use of CAR in newsgathering. (wikipedia.org)
  • The computer program can be constructed so as to place the results directly in a format that can be read by statistical analysis programs such as PSPP or DAP. (wikipedia.org)
  • drug
  • A practical guide, "How to implement computer-assisted drug registration", has been prepared in collaboration with Management Sciences for Health. (who.int)
  • Researchers at the Uppsala University (Sweden) are using a computer-assisted strategy for rapid drug design for various diseases. (biologynews.net)
  • form
  • Another possible way of verifying computer-aided proofs is to generate their reasoning steps in a machine-readable form, and then use an automated theorem prover to demonstrate their correctness. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is no need to transcribe the results into a computer form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another
  • Another argument against computer-aided proofs is that they lack mathematical elegance-that they provide no insights or new and useful concepts. (wikipedia.org)
  • make
  • An additional philosophical issue raised by computer-aided proofs is whether they make mathematics into a quasi-empirical science, where the scientific method becomes more important than the application of pure reason in the area of abstract mathematical concepts. (wikipedia.org)