• reactive
  • Potassium chlorate can react with sulfuric acid to form a highly reactive solution of chloric acid and potassium sulfate: 2 KClO3 + H2SO4 → 2 HClO3 + K2SO4 The solution so produced is sufficiently reactive that it spontaneously ignites if combustible material (sugar, paper, etc.) is present. (wikipedia.org)
  • aliphatic
  • Many flavin-dependent enzymes are capable of oxidizing aliphatic nitro compounds to less-toxic aldehydes and ketones. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nitroalkane oxidase and 3-nitropropionate oxidase oxidize aliphatic nitro compounds exclusively, whereas other enzymes such as glucose oxidase have other physiological substrates. (wikipedia.org)
  • chlorate
  • Potassium chlorate, often in combination with silver fulminate, is used in trick noise-makers known as "crackers", "snappers", "pop-its", or "bang-snaps", a popular type of novelty firework. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another application of potassium chlorate is as the oxidizer in a smoke composition such as that used in smoke grenades. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since 2005, a cartridge with potassium chlorate mixed with lactose and rosin is used for generating the white smoke signalling the election of new pope by a papal conclave. (wikipedia.org)
  • Potassium chlorate is often used in high school and college laboratories to generate oxygen gas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molten potassium chlorate is an extremely powerful oxidizer and spontaneously reacts with many common materials such as sugar. (wikipedia.org)
  • Impurities in potassium chlorate itself can also cause problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • When working with a new batch of potassium chlorate, it is advisable to take a small sample (~1 gram) and heat it strongly on an open glass plate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Potassium chlorate is used in chemical oxygen generators (also called chlorate candles or oxygen candles), employed as oxygen-supply systems of e.g. aircraft, space stations, and submarines, and has been responsible for at least one plane crash. (wikipedia.org)
  • The decomposition of potassium chlorate was also used to provide the oxygen supply for limelights. (wikipedia.org)
  • Potassium chlorate is used also as a pesticide. (wikipedia.org)
  • In schools, molten potassium chlorate is used in the dramatic screaming jelly babies demonstration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Insurgents in Afghanistan also use potassium chlorate extensively as a key component in the production of improvised explosive devices. (wikipedia.org)
  • reacts
  • Sodium bisulfite is a common reducing agent in the chemical industry, as it readily reacts with dissolved oxygen: 2 NaHSO3 + O2 → 2 NaHSO4 It is usually added to large piping systems to prevent oxidative corrosion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Liebig
  • After watching an itinerant trader make the explosive silver fulminate, Liebig produced the same compound. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Liebig attended the lectures of Gay-Lussac, The Nard, and Dugong, where he encountered a rigorous, quantitative, experimental chemistry unlike anything he had found in Germany and learned for I he first time some of the general principles connecting his knowledge of particular compounds and processes. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Scheele
  • Scheele knew that chlorine was a new element, but thought it contained oxygen as well. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Still, chlorine was not recognized as an element until 1774, when Scheele was studying the mineral pyrolusite. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Regardless of what he thought, Scheele did isolate chlorine by reacting MnO2 (as the mineral pyrolusite) with HCl: 4 HCl + MnO2 → MnCl2 + 2 H2O + Cl2 Scheele observed several of the properties of chlorine: the bleaching effect on litmus, the deadly effect on insects, the yellow-green color, and the smell similar to aqua regia. (wikipedia.org)
  • disinfectant
  • It is used as an oxidizing agent, to prepare oxygen, as a disinfectant, in safety matches, in explosives and fireworks, in cultivation, forcing the blossoming stage of the longan tree, causing it to produce fruit in warmer climates. (wikipedia.org)
  • substance
  • Chlorine is a strong oxidizing agent (a chemical substance that gives up or takes on electrons from another substance). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Common chemical theory at that time held that an acid is a compound that contains oxygen (remnants of this survive in the German and Dutch names of oxygen: sauerstoff or zuurstof, both translating into English as acid substance), so a number of chemists, including Claude Berthollet, suggested that Scheele's dephlogisticated muriatic acid air must be a combination of oxygen and the yet undiscovered element, muriaticum. (wikipedia.org)
  • On December 6, Gay-Lussac announced that the new substance was either an element or a compound of oxygen. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • mixtures
  • It is to be understood, however, that the novel compounds of this invention are likely to be mixtures of tautomeric forms, the compositions of which are dependent on such factors as the nature of R R R and R and the environment. (google.es)
  • substituent
  • These compounds, useful inter alia as hypertensive agents, bear a substituent in both the 4- and the 5-positions which is a secondary or a tertiary amino moiety. (google.es)