• knee
  • Shortly after, as the foot becomes flat on the ground, the knee gradually flexes approximately 10-15 degrees reaching the maximum at about 15% of the gait cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following through to mid-and terminal stance, the knee gradually extends with concentric activity of the knee extensor muscles and approaches near full extension as heel off occurs (30-40% of gait cycle). (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the hip cannot move fully, the body compensates by adapting its use of the spine, often causing spinal, stifle (a dog's knee joint), or soft tissue problems to arise. (wikipedia.org)
  • That puts a lot of stress in our knee because we compensate for that in our gait," says Dr. Oeltjenbruns. (cbslocal.com)
  • MR fluids control smart prosthesis knees that adapt and respond in real-time to changing conditions, giving above-knee amputees a natural gait. (machinedesign.com)
  • By comparing these commands to measured data from knee angle and force sensors, the controller is able to adjust damper current and compensate the actual gait profile so that it matches an ideal profile stored in memory. (machinedesign.com)
  • variability
  • It is a result of various factors with combination of Hypokinesia and sequence effect, severity and variability of sequence effect, severity of festination which depends on background level Hypokinesia, response to Hypokinesia to medications and the ability to focus on gait and visual cues, extrinsic environmental or attentional demands. (wikipedia.org)
  • difficulty
  • citation needed] Individuals with cerebellar ataxia could also display instability of gait, difficulty with eye movements, dysarthria, dysphagia, hypotonia, dysmetria and dysdiadochokinesia. (wikipedia.org)
  • muscles
  • Between 30-50% of the gait cycle, the hip flexor muscles are eccentrically acting as the hip continues to extend, until reaching maximal extension at approximately 10-15 degrees past neutral. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients
  • In addition, PD patients have reduced foot lifting during the swing phase of gait, which produces smaller clearance between the toes and the ground. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the more advanced stages of the disorder where gait is characterized by small shuffling steps, PD patients show only one narrow peak in the vertical GRF signal. (wikipedia.org)
  • heel
  • Whereas in normal gait, the heel strikes the ground before the toes (also called heel-to-toe walking), in Parkinsonian gait, motion is characterised by flat foot strike (where the entire foot is placed on the ground at the same time) or less often and in the more advanced stages of the disease by toe-to-heel walking (where the toes touch the ground before the heel). (wikipedia.org)
  • cycle
  • To compensate, the trunk lurches to the weakened side to attempt to maintain a level pelvis throughout the gait cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the gait cycle, the hallux and digits generally remain parallel to the long axis of the foot, regardless of the degree of forefoot abduction (or pronation) occurring (see the image below). (medscape.com)
  • phase
  • During the ON phase of the Dopaminergic treatment there is increase in gait speed and step length. (wikipedia.org)
  • The walking and running gaits of quadrupeds and bipeds show differences in the relative phase of the movements of their forelimbs and hind limbs, as well as of their right-side limbs versus their left-side limbs. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most impaired movement pattern of hip abduction is when the QL initiates the movement, which results in hip hiking during swing phase of gait. (wikipedia.org)
  • result
  • Sufferers frequently complain that an overly strenuous session at the gym, particularly with glute-isolating equipment, result in this awkward gait, or worse. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gait disturbances can also result from decreased activation of cognitive network especially in right posterior parietal cortex. (wikipedia.org)
  • swings
  • To compensate for this loss, the leg swings out laterally so that the foot can move forward, producing a shuffling or waddling gait. (wikipedia.org)
  • To compensate, the individual leans away from the unsupported side, raising the pelvis to allow adequate room for the foot to clear the ground as it swings forward. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • Parkinsonian gait is characterized by small shuffling steps and a general slowness of movement (hypokinesia), or even the total loss of movement (akinesia) in the extreme cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • itself
  • As such, rotation and obliquity of the pelvis have been determined to be instrumental in producing more symmetric gait, even when the rotation itself is asymmetric between intact and impaired limbs. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • That's because people alter their gait to compensate for the narrow path or fast pace of the treadmill. (reformer.com)
  • People with cerebellar ataxia may initially present with poor balance, which could be demonstrated as an inability to stand on one leg or perform tandem gait. (wikipedia.org)
  • seen
  • Gait variabilities seen are attributed to the defective inputs from the Basal Ganglia. (wikipedia.org)
  • current
  • It alters cortical excitability of region of interest that can be harnessed to optimized motor priming and motor learning procedures involved in gait rehabilitation Mechanisms resulting in post synaptic changes to induce long lasting plasticity is like that of LTP (long-term potentiation) and LTD (long-term Depression) depending upon polarity of the current used. (wikipedia.org)
  • foot
  • In normal gait, the vertical ground reaction force (GRF) plot has two peaks - one when the foot strikes the ground and the second peak is caused by push-off force from the ground. (wikipedia.org)
  • strong
  • He wasn't a dirty player, but he was as hard as nails, and was a strong runner (with a distinctive, high-stepping gait) and determined tackler. (wikipedia.org)
  • uses
  • The unsteadiness with eyes closed (sensory ataxia), relates to loss of sense of position in the legs and feet that are normally compensated for by the patient who uses vision to provide that information. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • These results may imply that age-related deteriorations in the postural control system do not specifically affect the ability to compensate for gait perturbations under fatigued condition. (uni-konstanz.de)