• impulsivity
  • In psychology, impulsivity (or impulsiveness) is a tendency to act on a whim, displaying behavior characterized by little or no forethought, reflection, or consideration of the consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Behavioral
  • Common areas of study include psychosocial development, environmental factors which contribute to the development of a disorder, outcomes of children with medical conditions, treating the comorbid behavioral and emotional components of illness and injury, and promoting proper health behaviors, developmental disabilities, educating psychologists and other health professionals on the psychological aspects of pediatric conditions, and advocating for public policy that promotes children's health. (wikipedia.org)
  • developmental
  • Currently, two possible developmental courses are thought to lead to conduct disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Både nationellt och internationellt har jag en rad olika förtroendeuppdrag, till exempel som gästforskare vid Centralinstitutet för mental hälsa vid Heidelbergs universitet, gästforskare vid Curtin University i Perth, grundare och styrelsemedlem i Scientific Society Autism Spectrum, redaktör för "Autism: the international journal of research and practice", biträdande redaktör för the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, och chefredaktör för Scandinavian Journal of Child Psychiatry and Psychology. (ki.se)
  • Primary care settings provide the most accessible and least stigmatizing resources for many families who have concerns about their children's developmental and/or behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychiatry
  • 1 , 2 Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry have recently developed clinical practice guidelines for this disorder. (aappublications.org)
  • cognitive
  • The Sukhodolsky lab is involved in clinical assessment of outcomes and the evaluation of electrophysiological correlates of attention and cognitive control. (yale.edu)
  • comorbidity
  • To address this apparent contradiction, confirmatory factor analytic methods and information-theoretic criteria were used to evaluate four theoretically plausible measurement models based on lifetime comorbidity patterns of seven putative externalizing disorders. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Non-random patterns of diagnostic comorbidity among some combinations of psychiatric disorders are common and likely meaningful. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Such patterns of comorbidity among psychiatric disorders highlight possible common etiological processes, genetic influences, or maintaining factors among subsets of disorders, and may also have implications for treatment selection and responsiveness to specific therapies ( Krueger, 1999 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • In several recent reports, confirmatory factor analytic (CFA) methods have been used to evaluate competing hierarchical models of psychiatric disorders based on concurrent, 12-month, or lifetime diagnostic comorbidity. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • A frequent assumption underlying this research is that the resultant measurement models reveal a "liability spectrum," whereby certain psychiatric disorders are regarded as expressions of latent liabilities that, in turn, explain diagnostic comorbidity or the increased risk for spectrum-related disorders during one's lifetime ( Krueger & Markon, 2006 ). (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • diagnosis
  • An older 2003 review of linkage studies also listed seven genes as likely to increase risk for a later diagnosis of the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • tics
  • Transient tic disorders consisted of multiple motor tics, phonic tics or both, with a duration between four weeks and twelve months. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic tic disorder was either single or multiple, motor or phonic tics (but not both), which were present for more than a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tourette syndrome is an inherited neurological disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by the presence of motor and phonic tics. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Maltreatment and parenting may play a role in the development of antisocial behavior, but better research is needed to understand the interaction between genetic and epigenetic factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Family studies indicate that the closer a person's genetic relatedness to a person with schizophrenia, the greater the likelihood of developing the disorder. (wikipedia.org)