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  • impulsivity
  • In psychology, impulsivity (or impulsiveness) is a tendency to act on a whim, displaying behavior characterized by little or no forethought, reflection, or consideration of the consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurobiological findings suggest that there are specific brain regions involved in impulsive behavior, although different brain networks may contribute to different manifestations of impulsivity, and that genetics may play a role. (wikipedia.org)
  • behavioral
  • Common areas of study include psychosocial development, environmental factors which contribute to the development of a disorder, outcomes of children with medical conditions, treating the comorbid behavioral and emotional components of illness and injury, and promoting proper health behaviors, developmental disabilities, educating psychologists and other health professionals on the psychological aspects of pediatric conditions, and advocating for public policy that promotes children's health. (wikipedia.org)
  • pediatric
  • Lithium has been studied the most in regards to pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD) and is surprisingly the only FDA approved mood stabilizer for kids. (pendulum.org)
  • This article has useful information in regards side effects, benefits, and prescribing information for pediatric bipolar disorder. (pendulum.org)
  • traits
  • Callous and unemotional traits (CU) are distinguished by a persistent pattern of behavior that reflects a disregard for others, and also a lack of empathy and generally deficient affect. (wikipedia.org)
  • The interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors may play a role in the expression of these traits as a conduct disorder (CD). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in combination with CU traits seem to cause antisocial behavior even without external hardships. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parenting interventions are the most commonly used treatment for treating early onset antisocial behaviors and conduct disorder in children, and quality parenting may be able to decrease the manifestation of CU traits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with high CU traits are less responsive to time-out and other punishment techniques than are healthy children as they are unperturbed by the threat of punishment and time-out does not seem to bother them, so their behavior does not improve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reward-based disciplining techniques, such as praise and reinforcement, tend to have a greater effect than punishing techniques on children with high CU traits in reducing antisocial behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • bipolar disorder
  • Suffering from Bipolar Disorder or Depression? (pendulum.org)
  • Anticonvulsants Safe for Kids With Bipolar Disorder? (pendulum.org)
  • This creates a problem when deciding what is the safest medication to prescribe a child with bipolar disorder. (pendulum.org)
  • This article goes over some of the risks and benefits of using anticonvulsants and other mood stabilizers in children diagnosed with bipolar disorder. (pendulum.org)
  • Special care must be taken when prescribing to adolescent girls with bipolar disorder due to some of these side effects. (pendulum.org)
  • Lamotrigine has been studied for kids with seizure disorders, but there are no controlled trials testing its effectiveness in kids with bipolar disorder. (pendulum.org)
  • Topiramate does not have much information available for use in children with bipolar disorder. (pendulum.org)
  • tics
  • Transient tic disorders consisted of multiple motor tics, phonic tics or both, with a duration between four weeks and twelve months. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic tic disorder was either single or multiple, motor or phonic tics (but not both), which were present for more than a year. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tourette syndrome is an inherited neurological disorder with onset in childhood, characterized by the presence of motor and phonic tics. (wikipedia.org)
  • studies indicate
  • Family studies indicate that the closer a person's genetic relatedness to a person with schizophrenia, the greater the likelihood of developing the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • comorbidity
  • To address this apparent contradiction, confirmatory factor analytic methods and information-theoretic criteria were used to evaluate four theoretically plausible measurement models based on lifetime comorbidity patterns of seven putative externalizing disorders. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Continuity
  • Continuity and change in levels of externalizing behavior in school of children from economically disadvantaged families. (bsl.nl)
  • clinical
  • There is some evidence to support the clinical lore that children with "TS-only" (Tourette syndrome in the absence of other comorbid conditions) are unusually gifted: neuropsychological studies have identified advantages in children with TS-only. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • Maltreatment and parenting may play a role in the development of antisocial behavior, but better research is needed to understand the interaction between genetic and epigenetic factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • impulsivity
  • In psychology, impulsivity (or impulsiveness) is a tendency to act on a whim, displaying behavior characterized by little or no forethought, reflection, or consideration of the consequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • traits
  • Callous and unemotional traits (CU) are distinguished by a persistent pattern of behavior that reflects a disregard for others, and also a lack of empathy and generally deficient affect. (wikipedia.org)
  • The interplay between genetic and environmental risk factors may play a role in the expression of these traits as a conduct disorder (CD). (wikipedia.org)
  • The addition "with limited prosocial emotions" to the conduct disorder diagnosis in DSM-5 is to classify a specific subgroup of antisocial youth with distinguishing antisocial behaviors and psychopathic traits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoactivity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in combination with CU traits seem to cause antisocial behavior even without external hardships. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with CU traits have more severe conduct disorder, and respond to different management. (wikipedia.org)
  • Children with high CU traits are less responsive to time-out and other punishment techniques than are healthy children as they are unperturbed by the threat of punishment and time-out does not seem to bother them, so their behavior does not improve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reward-based disciplining techniques, such as praise and reinforcement, tend to have a greater effect than punishing techniques on children with high CU traits in reducing antisocial behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • person's
  • Note: Only one Criterion A symptom is required if delusions are bizarre or hallucinations consist of a voice keeping up a running commentary on the person's behavior or thoughts, or two or more voices conversing with each other. (mental-health-matters.com)
  • Family studies indicate that the closer a person's genetic relatedness to a person with schizophrenia, the greater the likelihood of developing the disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is characterized by problems paying attention, excessive activity, or difficulty controlling behavior which is not appropriate for a person's age. (wikipedia.org)
  • distinguish
  • The condition can be difficult to tell apart from other disorders, as well as to distinguish from high levels of activity that are still within the normal-range. (wikipedia.org)
  • tics
  • Transient tic disorders consisted of multiple motor tics, phonic tics or both, with a duration between four weeks and twelve months. (infogalactic.com)
  • Chronic tic disorder was either single or multiple, motor or phonic tics (but not both), which were present for more than a year. (infogalactic.com)
  • Tourette
  • code F95.2 is for combined vocal and multiple motor tic disorder [de la Tourette]. (infogalactic.com)
  • There is some evidence to support the clinical lore that children with "TS-only" (Tourette syndrome in the absence of other comorbid conditions) are unusually gifted: neuropsychological studies have identified advantages in children with TS-only. (wikipedia.org)
  • etiology
  • The establishment of robust and replicable behavioural testing paradigms with translational value for psychiatric diseases is a major step forward in developing and testing etiology-directed treatment for these complex disorders. (springer.com)
  • Genetic
  • Maltreatment and parenting may play a role in the development of antisocial behavior, but better research is needed to understand the interaction between genetic and epigenetic factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • arousal
  • 5 Neural Circuitry Regulating Arousal and Attention Posterior Cortex NE Mediated In blue Frontal Cortex DA & NE Mediated In green LC Sensory Event The Locus Coeruleus (LC) communicates with the frontal and parietal cortex to regulate arousal and attention. (docplayer.net)