• paints
  • Oil paints have been used in Europe since the 12th century for simple decoration, but were not widely adopted as an artistic medium until the early 15th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • As public preference for naturalism increased, the quick-drying tempera paints became insufficient to achieve the very detailed and precise effects that oil could achieve. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most paints used either oil or water as a base (the diluent, solvent or vehicle for the pigment). (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to its polymer-forming properties, linseed oil can be used on its own or blended with combinations of other oils, resins or solvents as an impregnator, drying oil finish or varnish in wood finishing, as a pigment binder in oil paints, as a plasticizer and hardener in putty, and in the manufacture of linoleum. (wikipedia.org)
  • To prevent premature drying, linseed oil-based products (oil paints, putty) should be stored in air-tight containers. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can also be used as a painting medium, making oil paints more fluid, transparent and glossy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oil paints are made up of four parts, the base, the vehicle, the solvent and the driers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Products that can be made from vernonia oil include epoxies for manufacturing adhesives, varnishes and paints, and industrial coatings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Here are some basics to guide you into the wonderful world of oil paints. (blogspot.com)
  • Top 10 Tips for Beginning Oil Painting ThoughtCo Read: The Basics of Oil Painting on Canvas to find out a bit about canvas and how to easily get started painting with oil paints. (blogspot.com)
  • Oil Painting Cheap Joe's Art Stuff Cheap Joes Art Stuff offers a huge selection of oil paints. (blogspot.com)
  • Oil Painting Definition of Oil Painting by Merriam Webster Define oil painting: the art of painting with oil paints oil painting in a sentence Oil Paintings Etsy Shop for Oil Paintings on Etsy, the place to express your creativity through the buying and selling of handmade and vintage goods. (blogspot.com)
  • The oil has culinary and pharmaceutical uses, as well as long established uses in the making of paints, varnishes, and soaps. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 19th century poppy seed oil was used as cooking oil, lamp oil, and varnish, and was used to make paints and soaps. (wikipedia.org)
  • Particularly notable are its uses as a carrier for oil paints and as a pharmaceutical grade carrier for medicinal iodine and drugs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Painters prepared poppyseed oil by hand until the late 19th century, when oil paints became available prepared in tubes. (wikipedia.org)
  • While poppyseed oil does not cause as much yellowish tinting of paints as linseed oil, it dries slower and is less durable than linseed oil because the fat responsible for the yellowing also provides durability. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inexpensive and easy to produce, these paints were used for millennia in many different parts of the world and were commonly used in the United States until the 20th century. (monticello.org)
  • Linseed oil-based paints were not used on fresh plaster because traditional lime-based plaster is very alkaline when first applied (it has a high pH) and so it breaks down the oil in the paint. (monticello.org)
  • linoleum
  • Linoleum, also called Lino, is a floor covering made from materials such as solidified linseed oil (linoxyn), pine rosin, ground cork dust, wood flour, and mineral fillers such as calcium carbonate, most commonly on a burlap or canvas backing. (wikipedia.org)
  • mixture
  • This mixture was known as oglio cotto-"cooked oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • the pigment and oil mixture would have been ground into a paste with a mortar and pestle. (wikipedia.org)
  • but the word paint is usually confined to a mixture of oil and pigment, ground together in a process that thoroughly coats every small particle of pigment in oil, together with other materials which possess properties necessary to enable the paint to dry hard and with a degree of flexibility and to varying degrees of opacity/translucency. (wikipedia.org)
  • rubbery
  • If the oil is subjected to raised temperatures for a long time, it will become a rubbery oil-insoluble substance. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1855, Walton happened to notice the rubbery, flexible skin of solidified linseed oil (linoxyn) that had formed on a can of oil-based paint and thought that it might form a substitute for India rubber. (wikipedia.org)
  • slowly
  • Indeed, linseed oil was not used as a medium because of its tendency to dry very slowly, darken, and crack, unlike mastic and wax (the latter of which was used in encaustic painting). (wikipedia.org)
  • Raw linseed oil oxidizes very slowly, but Walton accelerated the process by heating it with lead acetate[clarification needed] and zinc sulfate. (wikipedia.org)
  • epoxy
  • Linseed oil is also often used by billiards or pool cue-makers for cue shafts, as a lubricant/protectant for wooden recorders, and used in place of epoxy to seal modern wooden surfboards. (wikipedia.org)
  • In its application as an epoxy oil, vernonia oil competes with soybean or linseed oil, which supply most of the market for these applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • solvents
  • The oil hardens through a chemical reaction in which the components crosslink (and hence, polymerize) by the action of oxygen (not through the evaporation of water or other solvents). (wikipedia.org)
  • resinous
  • When thickened, the oils became resinous and could be used as varnish to seal and protect paintings from water. (wikipedia.org)
  • This made the oil form a resinous mass into which lengths of cheap cotton cloth were dipped until a thick coating formed. (wikipedia.org)
  • similarly
  • Linseed oil use has declined over the past several decades with increased availability of synthetic alkyd resins-which function similarly but resist yellowing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Coconut
  • Coconut "oil" is so called because where it grows is much hotter and it is usually liquid though over here in the colder UK it becomes solid. (flaxfarm.co.uk)
  • coats
  • French polishing consists of applying many thin coats of shellac dissolved in denatured alcohol using a rubbing pad lubricated with one of a variety of oils (see below). (wikipedia.org)
  • Thickness of coat has considerable bearing on time required for drying: thin coats of oil paint dry relatively quickly. (wikipedia.org)
  • varnish
  • Linseed oil does not cover the surface as varnish does, but soaks into the (visible and microscopic) pores, leaving a shiny but not glossy surface that shows off the grain of the wood. (wikipedia.org)
  • resins
  • It was not until the stimulus of World War II created a shortage of linseed oil in the supply market that artificial resins, or alkyds, were invented. (wikipedia.org)
  • stable
  • Since about 1900, palm oil has been increasingly incorporated into food by the global commercial food industry because it remains stable in deep frying, or in baking at very high temperatures, and for its high levels of natural antioxidants. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxygen
  • The "drying", hardening, or, more properly, curing of oils is the result of autoxidation, the addition of oxygen to an organic compound and the subsequent crosslinking. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally
  • Additionally, when yellow pigment was added to oil, it could be spread over tin foil as a less expensive alternative to gold leaf. (wikipedia.org)
  • peanut oil
  • Peanut oil and rapeseed oil have far more oleic acid and are less expensive, and may be superior to poppyseed oil for giving iodine by mouth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Peanut oil, cashew oil and other nut-based oils may present a hazard to persons with a nut allergy. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxicity
  • The traditional "Pharaoh's serpent" version of this firework produces a more impressive snake, but its operation depends upon mercury (II) thiocyanate, which is no longer commonly used because of its toxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • iodine
  • One common measure of the "siccative" (drying) property of oils is iodine number, which is an indicator of the number of double bonds in the oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oils with an iodine number greater than 130 are considered drying, those with an iodine number of 115-130 are semi-drying, and those with an iodine number of less than 115 are non-drying. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iodized poppyseed oil (oil with iodine added) has several kinds of pharmaceutical uses. (wikipedia.org)
  • In some regions where iodized salt is not available, iodized poppyseed oil is the standard for preventing iodine deficiency and its complications including goiter. (wikipedia.org)
  • A recent clinical trial in which iodized oil was given by mouth found that the amount of iodine taken up (see bioavailability) varied with the amount of oleic acid in the oil. (wikipedia.org)
  • paste
  • The piece is usually finished off after leveling (1500 grit oil sanding), then light buffing with carnauba paste wax. (wikipedia.org)
  • room temperature
  • For simple practical purposes, a fat is solid at room temperature and oil is liquid due to the differences in composition. (horsefeedblog.com)
  • Oils that are healthy at room temperature can become unhealthy when heated above certain temperatures, so when choosing a cooking oil, it is important to match the oil's heat tolerance with the temperature which will be used. (wikipedia.org)
  • Litharge
  • The Flemish-trained or influenced Antonello da Messina, who Vasari wrongly credited with the introduction of oil paint to Italy, does seem to have improved the formula by adding litharge, or lead (II) oxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of any cooked oils or Litharge (sugar of Lead) darkens an oil painting rapidly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Boiled oil is the raw oil heated with driers, such as litharge or red lead, to a temperature from 350° to 500 °F, at which it is maintained for three or four hours. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several
  • There are several bases for oil paint, those most commonly used for building work being white lead, red lead, zinc white and iron oxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Other inventors began their own experiments after Walton took out his patent, and in 1871 William Parnacott took out a patent for a method of producing linoxyn by blowing hot air into a tank of linseed oil for several hours, then cooling the material in trays. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oil from the seeds is used to treat several diseases. (dailyrecord.co.uk)
  • consist
  • Sterols in poppyseed oil consist almost entirely of campesterol, stigmasterol, sitosterol and delta 5-avenasterol. (wikipedia.org)