• crop
  • As already mentioned, amaranth is one of the few nongrasses with potential for becoming a cereal-like grain crop. (nzdl.org)
  • Foods
  • By 1976 over 1,000,000 pounds (450,000 kg) of the dye worth $5 million was used as a colorant in $10 billion worth of foods, drugs and cosmetics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sellers at the time offered more than 80 artificial coloring agents, some invented for dyeing textiles, not foods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another important use of amaranth throughout Mesoamerica was to prepare ritual drinks and foods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Flowers
  • Diego Durán described the festivities for Huitzilopochtli, the name of which means "hummingbird of the left side" or "left-handed hummingbird" (Real hummingbirds feed on amaranth flowers). (wikipedia.org)
  • agents
  • This category is used most commonly for agents, mixtures and exposure circumstances for which the evidence of carcinogenicity is inadequate in humans and inadequate or limited in experimental animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • Sweet breads are most commonly consumed in the morning as part of breakfast or at night, as part of a ritual called "merienda," a small meal taken between 6 and 8pm, along with a hot beverage such as coffee or hot chocolate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calamari, octopus, and cuttlefish commonly feature in meze, a spread of small dishes served as an extensive set of entrées. (wikipedia.org)
  • especially
  • Annatto is commonly used to give some cheddar cheese products (especially in the USA) a characteristic golden to orange shade. (viveri.com)
  • Because of its importance as a symbol of indigenous culture, its gluten-free palatability, ease of cooking, and a protein that is particularly well-suited to human nutritional needs, interest in grain amaranth (especially A. cruentus and A. hypochondriacus) revived in the 1970s. (wikipedia.org)
  • made
  • In Oaxaca, they commonly take the shape of skulls, crowns, crucifixes, the dead and are made from crystallized sugar with honey in the center. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spanish
  • After the Spanish conquest, cultivation of amaranth was outlawed, while some of the festivities were subsumed into the Christmas celebration. (wikipedia.org)
  • products
  • In Norway, it was banned between 1978 and 2001, a period in which azo dyes were only legally used in alcoholic beverages and some fish products. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • In 1971 a Soviet study linked the dye to cancer. (wikipedia.org)
  • The UK FSA commissioned a study of six food dyes (Tartrazine, Allura Red, Ponceau 4R, Quinoline Yellow WS, Sunset Yellow, Carmoisine (dubbed the "Southampton 6")), and sodium benzoate (a preservative) on children in the general population, who consumed them in beverages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another
  • All azo-dyes have the same molecular structure inside the molecule: a so called 'azo' group.An azo-group is a structure of two nitrogen atoms attached to one another with a double bond and both being connected to another part of the molecule (-N=N-). This group is importance with regards to its colour properties. (foodcrumbles.com)
  • less
  • Many synthesized dyes were easier and less costly to produce and were superior in coloring properties when compared to naturally derived alternatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • potential
  • It is by far the most commonly used red dye in the United States, completely replacing amaranth (Red 2) and also replacing erythrosine (Red 3) in most applications due to the potential health effects of the two dyes. (wikipedia.org)