• 1918
  • Bacterial coinfection complicated nearly all influenza deaths in the 1918 influenza pandemic and up to 34% of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) infections managed in intensive care units worldwide. (nih.gov)
  • liver
  • An example is the coinfection of liver cells with Hepatitis B virus and Hepatitis D virus, which can arise incrementally by initial infection followed by superinfection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pregnant women with HIV/HBV coinfection receiving antiretroviral (ARV) drugs should be counseled about signs and symptoms of liver toxicity, and liver transaminases should be assessed 1 month following initiation of ARV drugs and at least every 3 months thereafter during pregnancy (BIII) . (nih.gov)
  • If ARV drugs that include anti-HBV activity are discontinued in women with HIV/HBV coinfection, frequent monitoring of liver function tests for potential exacerbation of HBV infection is recommended, with prompt re-initiation of treatment for HBV if a flare is suspected (BIII) . (nih.gov)
  • patients
  • Some studies have found rates of neurocognitive dysfunction in HIV/HCV coinfection not to be significantly worse than rates in HCV-monoinfected individuals.6,7 Other studies observe a trend for patients with HIV/HCV coinfection to perform worse neurocognitively than patients infected solely with HIV. (natap.org)
  • Data from 683 critically ill patients with 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) infection admitted to 35 intensive care units in the United States reveal that bacterial coinfection commonly occurs within the first 6 days of influenza infection, presents similarly to influenza infection occurring alone, and is associated with an increased risk of death. (nih.gov)
  • C-WORTHY Coinfection studied patients with HCV and HIV. (wikipedia.org)
  • Care
  • HIV/HBV coinfection does not necessitate cesarean delivery, if not otherwise indicated (see Intrapartum Care ) (AIII) . (nih.gov)