• processes
  • This volume explores "cognition" in the study of religion - that is, the mental processes that govern religious belief and behavior across cultures and eras. (platekompaniet.no)
  • Motor cognition takes into account the preparation and production of actions, as well as the processes involved in recognizing, predicting, mimicking and understanding the behavior of other people. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus the quantum cognition approach can be considered as an attempt to formalize contextuality of mental processes by using the mathematical apparatus of quantum mechanics. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many processes in which implicit memory works, which include learning, our social cognition, and our problem solving skills. (wikipedia.org)
  • These representation-based frameworks consider distributed cognition as "a cognitive system whose structures and processes are distributed between internal and external representations, across a group of individuals, and across space and time" (Zhang and Patel, 2006). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cognition is said to be "socially distributed" when it is applied to demonstrate how interpersonal processes can be used to coordinate activity within a social group. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extended cognition is the view that mental processes and mind extend beyond the body to include aspects of the environment in which an organism is embedded and the organism's interaction with that environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • The field of extended cognition focuses upon the processes involved in this creation, and subsumes these processes as part of consciousness. (wikipedia.org)
  • This view of cognition is sometimes referred to as 'enaction' to emphasise the role of interplay between the organism and its environment and the feedback processes involved in developing an awareness of, and a reformation of, the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embodiment
  • Marcin MiƂkowski: Explaining the Computational Mind, p. 4 The separation of embodied cognition from extended cognition and situated cognition can be based upon the embodiment thesis, a narrower view of embodiment than that of Varela et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • or that of Dawson: Embodiment thesis: Many features of cognition are embodied in that they are deeply dependent upon characteristics of the physical body of an agent, such that the agent's beyond-the-brain body plays a significant causal role, or a physically constitutive role, in that agent's cognitive processing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grounded Cognition, concerned with the role of simulations and embodiment in cognition, encompasses Cognitive Linguistics, Situated Action, Simulation and Social Simulation theories. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to Zhang & Norman (1994), the distributed cognition approach has three key components: Embodiment of information that is embedded in representations of interaction Coordination of enaction among embodied agents Ecological contributions to a cognitive ecosystem 'Dcog' studies the "propagation of representational states across media" (Rogers and Ellis, ibid. (wikipedia.org)
  • conceptual
  • The research program in the Harvard University Laboratory for Developmental Studies combines psychological approaches with philosophical inquiries to research many deep philosophical questions [regarding the] human knowledge system, conceptual structures, cognition and consciousness and the theory of mind, and the program's principal investigator, Professor Susan Carey, is not only a psychologist but also a philosopher. (dickinson.edu)
  • In 1962 Douglas C. Engelbart released the report "Augmenting Human Intellect: A Conceptual Framework" which introduced, and laid the groundwork for, augmented cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Motion and color cognition is a branch of cognitive neuroscience devoted to using brain imaging, psychophysical experiments, and computational modeling to understand the interactions between motion and color processing in the human visual system. (springer.com)
  • Topics included in the domain of numerical cognition include: How do non-human animals process numerosity? (wikipedia.org)
  • Non-human research still has a major place in this field, however, and is especially useful in illuminating which nonverbal behaviors signify components of theory of mind, and in pointing to possible stepping points in the evolution of what many claim to be a uniquely human aspect of social cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recently, most non-human theory of mind research has focused on monkeys and great apes, who are of most interest in the study of the evolution of human social cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Embodied cognition is the theory that many features of cognition, whether human or otherwise, are shaped by aspects of the entire body of the organism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eleanor Rosch, Evan Thompson, Francisco J. Varela: The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience pages 172-173 The Varela enactive definition is broad enough to overlap the views of extended cognition and situated cognition, and indeed, these ideas are not always carefully separated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Augmented cognition research generally focuses on tasks and environments where human-computer interaction and interfaces already exist. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many of the same arguments in the debate around human enhancement can be analogized to augmented cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • capacities
  • defined "embodied": "By using the term embodied we mean to highlight two points: first that cognition depends upon the kinds of experience that come from having a body with various sensorimotor capacities, and second, that these individual sensorimotor capacities are themselves embedded in a more encompassing biological, psychological and cultural context. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition, page 62 Some authors explain the dependence of cognition upon the body and its environmental interactions by saying cognition in real biological systems is not an end in itself but is constrained by the system's goals and capacities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Plant cognition is the study of the mental capacities of plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Foglia
  • RA Wilson and L Foglia, Embodied Cognition in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy This thesis omits direct mention of some aspects of the "more encompassing biological, psychological and cultural context" included by Varela et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • Emergence
  • Cognition goes beyond the manipulation of symbols to include the emergence of order and structure evolving from active engagement with the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Major advancements in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) have been pivotal in the emergence of augmented cognition technologies which seek to monitor the user's cognitive abilities. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Singing in a foreign language can significantly improve learning how to speak it, according to a new study published in Springer's journal Memory & Cognition . (springer.com)
  • Cognition is an international journal that publishes theoretical and experimental papers on the study of the mind. (elsevier.com)
  • Nevertheless, computational cognitive models can still contribute to the study of cognition mostly when it is combined with other research approaches, as implements by John Anderson with his ACT-R model. (wikipedia.org)
  • aspects
  • It covers a wide variety of subjects concerning all the different aspects of cognition , ranging from biological and experimental studies to formal analysis. (elsevier.com)
  • It's exciting to be able to use functional brain imaging to see the way children's weight affects the aspects of cognition that influence and underlie achievement," said postdoctoral researcher and co-author Naiman Khan. (psychcentral.com)
  • The idea of a continuity between the different aspects of motor cognition is not new. (wikipedia.org)
  • In philosophy, embodied cognition holds that an agent's cognition is strongly influenced by aspects of an agent's body beyond the brain itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disjunctive cognition is a common phenomenon in dreams, first identified by psychoanalyst Mark Blechner, in which two aspects of cognition do not match each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blechner has suggested that whenever disjunctive cognitions occur, the two aspects of cognition that are disjunctive are handled in different parts of the brain whose mutual integration is suppressed or shifted during sleep. (wikipedia.org)
  • DCog is a useful approach for (re)designing the technologically mediated social aspects of cognition by putting emphasis on the individual and his/her environment, and the media channels with which people interact, either in order to communicate with each other, or socially coordinate to perform complex tasks. (wikipedia.org)
  • paradigm
  • The fundamental unit of the motor cognition paradigm is action, defined as the movements produced to satisfy an intention towards a specific motor goal, or in reaction to a meaningful event in the physical and social environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Quantum cognition is based on the quantum-like paradigm or generalized quantum paradigm or quantum structure paradigm that information processing by complex systems such as the brain, taking into account contextual dependence of information and probabilistic reasoning, can be mathematically described in the framework of quantum information and quantum probability theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Foundations
  • Recent derivations of the complete quantum formalism from simple operational principles for representation of information supports the foundations of quantum cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • behavior
  • However, they argue, such constraints do not mean cognition is set by adaptive behavior (or autopoiesis) alone, but cognition requires "some kind of information processing. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2014, Anthony Trewavas released a book called Plant Behavior and Intelligence that highlighted a plant's cognition through its colonial-organization skills reflecting insect swarm behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • social
  • But it is most plausibly justified on cognitive grounds--as a way of counteracting predictable problems in individual and social cognition. (repec.org)
  • The concept of motor cognition grasps the notion that cognition is embodied in action, and that the motor system participates in what is usually considered as mental processing, including those involved in social interaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Implicit cognition also plays a role in social cognition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Situated cognition is a theory that posits that knowing is inseparable from doing by arguing that all knowledge is situated in activity bound to social, cultural and physical contexts. (wikipedia.org)
  • John Milton Roberts thought that social organization could be seen as cognition through a community (Roberts 1964). (wikipedia.org)
  • A subfield of the science, Augmented Social Cognition, endeavours to enhance the "ability of a group of people to remember, think, and reason. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Cognition occasionally publishes special issues devoted to a research area that has seen rapid recent progress, promising new approaches, and convergence among different disciplines. (elsevier.com)
  • books.google.com - Bringing together a comprehensive and diverse collection of research, theory, and thought, this volume builds a foundation for the new field of Augmented Cognition research and development. (google.com)
  • We conduct world-class research into deafness, cognition and language. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Our research informs our understanding of how deafness affects cognition, language and the brain. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Recently theorists have recognized a natural affinity between situated cognition, New Literacy Studies and new literacies research (Gee, 2010). (wikipedia.org)
  • The agenda focused on near-, medium-, and long-term research and development goals in key augmented cognition science and technology areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • draws
  • He considered that distributed cognition draws from the information processing metaphor of cognitive science where a system is considered in terms of its inputs and outputs and tasks are decomposed into a problem space (Perry, 1998). (wikipedia.org)
  • theoretical
  • A paper's theoretical relevance to cognition, overall soundness of the argument and degree of empirical motivation, especially from converging sources, are more important than adherence to specific methodological principles. (elsevier.com)
  • Because Cognition enjoys a wide readership from many disciplines, authors should explicitly consider the general theoretical issues raised by their work and its relevance to other topics and methods. (elsevier.com)
  • field
  • These and other different approaches to the analysis of cognition are synthesised in the developing field of cognitive science, a progressively autonomous academic discipline. (wikipedia.org)
  • Advances in cognitive, behavioral, and neurological sciences during the 1990s set the stage for the emerging field of augmented cognition - this period has been termed the "Decade of the Brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Citation
  • citation needed] In 1998, Mark Perry from Brunel University London explored the problems and the benefits brought by distributed cognition to "understanding the organisation of information within its contexts. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1999, Gavriel Salomon stated that there were two classes of distributive cognition: shared cognition and off-loading[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • tasks
  • The features of cognition include high level mental constructs (such as concepts and categories) and performance on various cognitive tasks (such as reasoning or judgment). (wikipedia.org)
  • mental
  • It can be seen with this example that implicit cognition is involved with many of the different mental activities and everyday situations of people's daily lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mental content is considered to be non-reducible to individual cognition and is more properly understood as off-loaded and extended into the environment, where information is also made available to other agents (Heylighen, Heath, & Overwalle, 2003). (wikipedia.org)
  • interactions
  • More recent perspectives of situated cognition have focused on and draw from the concept of identity formation as people negotiate meaning through interactions within communities of practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • environments
  • As these tools were primarily used in controlled environments, their further development was essential to pragmatic augmented cognition applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Authors
  • The authors gave five conditions of minimal cognition in living beings, and concluded that 'plants are cognitive in a minimal, embodied sense that also applies to many animals and even bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • journal
  • Cognition and Cost-Benefit Analysis ," The Journal of Legal Studies , University of Chicago Press, vol. 29(2), pages 1059-1103, June. (repec.org)
  • approach
  • Music, Cognition, and Computerized Sound is the first book to provide that coverage, and it does so via a unique and useful approach. (princeton.edu)
  • The subjective probability viewpoint on quantum probability which was developed by C. Fuchs and collaborators also supports the quantum cognition approach, especially using of quantum probabilities to describe the process of decision making. (wikipedia.org)
  • In their proposal for an enactive approach to cognition Varela et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • DCog" is a specific approach to distributed cognition (distinct from other meanings) which takes a computational perspective towards goal-based activity systems. (wikipedia.org)