• warm
  • This is the largest evaluation of warm ischemia time in patients with. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Using a technique called warm ischemia, surgeons kept the patient's kidneys at body temperature during the partial nephrectomy. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Researchers found that each additional minute of warm ischemia is associated with a 5 to 6 percent increase in the odds of developing acute renal failure or reduced kidney functioning and is associated with a 6 percent increased risk of new onset Stage IV chronic kidney disease during long-term follow-up. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This is the largest evaluation of warm ischemia time in patients with a single kidney who are undergoing a partial nephrectomy, combining the experiences of the Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic, both leaders in the field of kidney cancer," says R. Houston Thompson, M.D., ( http://www.mayoclinic.org/bio/13623818.html ) Mayo Clinic urologist and the study's primary investigator. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Historically, 30 minutes was considered the maximum safe duration of warm ischemia during partial nephrectomy, and other retrospective clinical studies have suggested that warm ischemia for 40 to 55 minutes is safe," says Dr. Thompson. (bio-medicine.org)
  • oxygen
  • Ischemia or ischaemia is a restriction in blood supply to tissues, causing a shortage of oxygen and needed for cellular metabolism (to keep tissue alive). (wikipedia.org)
  • Ischemia comprises not only insufficiency of oxygen, but also reduced availability of nutrients and inadequate removal of metabolic wastes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Venous insufficiency may also cause white blood cells (leukocytes) to accumulate in small blood vessels, releasing inflammatory factors and reactive oxygen species (ROS, free radicals) and further contributing to chronic wound formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgical
  • Intestine transplantation, intestinal transplantation, or small bowel transplantation is the surgical replacement of the small intestine for chronic and acute cases of intestinal failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • minimize
  • Animal experiments focus on understanding the mechanism behind IRI and try to find methods to minimize IRI either before, during or after ischemia. (biomedcentral.com)
  • inflammatory
  • In chronic rejected allografts, thickened CapBM may be a consequence of an unresolved immune-inflammatory response worsened by CI. (oup.com)
  • Ischemia not only up-regulates inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, but also enhances the expression of MHC-class II and adhesion molecules on epithelial and dendritic cells. (current-gene-therapy.com)
  • For example, chronic wounds often remain in the inflammatory stage for too long. (wikipedia.org)
  • Repeated physical trauma plays a role in chronic wound formation by continually initiating the inflammatory cascade. (wikipedia.org)
  • ulcers
  • Persistent pain (at night, at rest, and with activity) is the main problem for patients with chronic ulcers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heroin users who lose venous access may resort to 'skin popping', or injecting the drug subcutaneously, which is highly damaging to tissue and frequently leads to chronic ulcers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Venous ulcer before surgery Healing process of a chronic venous stasis ulcer of the lower leg Healing venous ulcer after one month The exact cause of venous ulcers is not certain, but they are thought to arise when venous valves that exist to prevent backflow of blood do not function properly, causing the pressure in veins to increase. (wikipedia.org)
  • trauma
  • In addition to poor circulation, neuropathy, and difficulty moving, factors that contribute to chronic wounds include systemic illnesses, age, and repeated trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • The reason a wound becomes chronic is that the body's ability to deal with the damage is overwhelmed by factors such as repeated trauma, continued pressure, ischemia, or illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Animal model and human tissue (preclinical studies) implicate CysLTR1 antagonists as having protective/reparative effects in models of brain injury (trauma-, ischemia-, and cold-induced), multiple sclerosis, auto-immune encephalomyelitis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • alcohol
  • In populations largely protected by hepatitis B vaccination, such as the United States, HCC is most often linked to causes of cirrhosis such as chronic hepatitis C, obesity, and alcohol abuse. (wikipedia.org)
  • viral
  • while some theorise the risk increases, case studies are rare and suggest the opposite where Wilson's disease actually may confer protection) Hemophilia, although statistically associated with higher risk of HCC, this is due to coincident chronic viral hepatitis infection related to repeated blood transfusions over lifetime. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • It is recommended that healthcare providers handle the pain related to chronic wounds as one of the main priorities in chronic wound management (together with addressing the cause). (wikipedia.org)
  • This should be contrasted with cold agglutinins, which cause agglutination of red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • duration
  • Others apply acute to pain that lasts less than 30 days, chronic to pain of more than six months' duration, and subacute to pain that lasts from one to six months. (wikipedia.org)
  • wounds
  • wounds that do not heal within three months are often considered chronic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic wounds seem to be detained in one or more of the phases of wound healing. (wikipedia.org)
  • in chronic wounds this balance is lost and degradation plays too large a role. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic wounds may never heal or may take years to do so. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute and chronic wounds are at opposite ends of a spectrum of wound-healing types that progress toward being healed at different rates. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another factor that may contribute to chronic wounds is old age. (wikipedia.org)
  • Periwound skin damage caused by excessive amounts of exudate and other bodily fluids can perpetuate the non-healing status of chronic wounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic wounds may affect only the epidermis and dermis, or they may affect tissues all the way to the fascia. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are the major occurrence of chronic wounds, occurring in 70% to 90% of leg ulcer cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathogenesis
  • Serial biopsies also allow evaluation of progression of histological lesions and provide an insight into the pathogenesis of chronic graft loss. (wiley.com)
  • congenital
  • Children and adolescents are unlikely to have chronic liver disease, however, if they suffer from congenital liver disorders, this fact increases the chance of developing hepatocellular carcinoma. (wikipedia.org)