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  • phenotype
  • 2. Outline the nature and effects on the phenotype of numerical and structural changes of chromosomes. (aber.ac.uk)
  • Discerning the central role of chromosomes in governing the phenotype is an important skill in terms of pursuing a career in clinical and biomedical science. (aber.ac.uk)
  • The gene then needs to be mapped by comparing the inheritance of the phenotype with other known genetic markers. (wikipedia.org)
  • A consensus definition of the concept of epigenetic trait as "stably heritable phenotype resulting from changes in a chromosome without alterations in the DNA sequence" was formulated at a Cold Spring Harbor meeting in 2008, although alternate definitions that include non-heritable traits are still being used. (wikipedia.org)
  • sequence
  • allele one of multiple alternative forms of a single gene, each of which is a viable DNA sequence occupying a given position, or locus on a chromosome. (wikipedia.org)
  • pattern
  • First generation offspring are heterozygous, requiring them to be inbred to create the homozygous pattern necessary for stable inheritance. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacterial
  • anaphase aneuploidy anticodon autosome Contents: Top 0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) base pair A pair of nucleotide bases on complementary DNA or RNA strands organized in a double helix. (wikipedia.org)
  • transfer
  • Mercury Resistance Transposon Tn813 Mediates Chromosome Transfer in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides and Intergeneric Transfer of pBR322. (moluna.de)
  • particular
  • The word chromosome (/ˈkroʊməˌsoʊm, -ˌzoʊm/) comes from the Greek χρῶμα (chroma, "colour") and σῶμα (soma, "body"), describing their strong staining by particular dyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • basis
  • The Greek prefix epi- (ἐπι- "over, outside of, around") in epigenetics implies features that are "on top of" or "in addition to" the traditional genetic basis for inheritance. (wikipedia.org)