• pervasive
  • A. Dawel, R. O'Kearney, E. McKone, and R. Palermo, "Not just fear and sadness: meta-analytic evidence of pervasive emotion recognition deficits for facial and vocal expressions in psychopathy," Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews , vol. 36, no. 10, pp. 2288-2304, 2012. (hindawi.com)
  • This course is often linked to a more persistent life course and more pervasive behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • impairment
  • Externalizing disorders are mental disorders characterized by externalizing behaviors, maladaptive behaviors directed toward an individual's environment, which cause impairment or interference in life functioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • As with all DSM-5 mental disorders, an individual must have functional impairment in at least one domain (e.g., academic, occupational, social relationships, or family functioning) in order to meet diagnostic criteria for an externalizing disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychiatric
  • Molecular genetic approaches to understanding the comorbidity of psychiatric disorders. (cambridge.org)
  • A child may exhibit antisocial behavior in response to a specific stressor (such as the death of a parent or a divorce ) for a limited period of time, but this is not considered a psychiatric condition. (encyclopedia.com)
  • DSM-IV Codes are the classification found in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition, Text Revision, also known as DSM-IV-TR, a manual published by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) that includes all currently recognized mental health disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • cognitive
  • Hence, the aim of this study was to determine whether adolescents with CD exhibit atypical affective and cognitive neural empathic responses during pain-related empathy processing. (frontiersin.org)
  • Adolescents with CD exhibited dampened hemodynamic responses during pain-related empathy processing in the bilateral TPJ, a region associated with cognitive empathy. (frontiersin.org)
  • These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that adolescents with CD may have a cognitive empathy deficiency. (frontiersin.org)
  • Factors that contribute to a particular child's antisocial behavior vary, but they usually include some form of family problems (e.g., marital discord, harsh or inconsistent disciplinary practices or actual child abuse , frequent changes in primary caregiver or in housing, learning or cognitive disabilities, or health problems). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Some of these deficits include immature forms of thinking (such as egocentrism), failure to use verbal mediators to regulate his or her behavior, and cognitive distortions, such as interpreting a neutral event as an intentional hostile act. (wikipedia.org)
  • indicate the general medical condition] 294.8 Amnestic disorder NOS 294.9 Cognitive disorder NOS Top 293.89 Catatonic disorder due to. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychological
  • Negative life events, emotions and psychological difficulties as determinants of salivary cortisol in Belgian primary school children," Psychoneuroendocrinology , vol. 37, no. 9, pp. 1506-1515, 2012. (hindawi.com)
  • occur
  • In panic disorder, individuals experience panic attacks that occur spontaneously, and that are not triggered by any phobic stimulus. (mentalhealth.com)
  • The DSM-5 includes several additional diagnostic criteria which describe the duration, setting, and onset of the disorder: the outbursts must be present for at least 12 months and occur in at least two settings (e.g. home and school), and it must be severe in at least one setting. (wikipedia.org)
  • The onset is believed to occur in late teens or early twenties and the disorder is considered to be generally chronic. (wikipedia.org)
  • adolescence
  • Most children go through periods of being difficult, particularly during the period from 18 months to three years, and later during adolescence. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Consequently, the child receives little care or supervision and, especially during adolescence , is free to join peers who have similarly learned antisocial means of expression. (encyclopedia.com)
  • typically
  • However, given that the NCBRF was developed for youth with developmental disabilities and the NCBRF-TIQ was designed for typically developing children, it is not surprising that factor analysis derived somewhat different behavioral constructs. (wikipedia.org)
  • While playing these games, children with DMDD report more agitation and negative emotional arousal than their typically-developing peers. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment, which typically lasts for several months, focuses on parents learning to provide positive reinforcement, such as praise and rewards, for children's appropriate behaviors while setting proper limits, using methods such as removing attention, for inappropriate behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typically, parents learn to reward appropriate behavior through social rewards (such as praise, smiles, and hugs) as well as concrete rewards (such as stickers or points towards a larger reward as part of an incentive system created collaboratively with the child). (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychology
  • Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 30: 438:439 (2001) "Including one of the late Dennis Cantwell's last papers, this exhaustive collection of studies is both thoughtful and refreshingly pragmatic. (booktopia.com.au)
  • psychotic
  • The different adaptations of the K-SADS were written by different researchers and are used to screen for many affective and psychotic disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Written by a clinical psychologist, this user-friendly, jargon-free guide describes mental health and learning disorders often observed in school children, explains how each might be exhibited in the classroom, and offers expert suggestions on what to do (and sometimes what not to do). (iser.com)
  • Chapters in each volume provide a comprehensive review of the evidence-based practice literature for each disorder and then cover several different treatment types for clinical implementation. (wiley.com)
  • Clinical Decision-Making Following Disasters: Efficient Identification of PTSD Risk in Adolescents. (cambridge.org)
  • Diagnosis is based on a clinical interview with the child and parents. (wikipedia.org)
  • High levels of antisocial behavior are considered a clinical disorder. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Versions of the K-SADS are semi-structured interviews administered by health care providers or highly trained clinical researchers, which gives more flexibility to the interviewer about how to phrase and probe items, while still covering a consistent set of disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • The KSADS-P is a structured interview given by trained clinicians or clinical researchers who interview both the child and the parent. (wikipedia.org)
  • stimuli
  • Youth with DMDD have difficulty attending, processing, and responding to negative emotional stimuli and social experiences in their everyday lives. (wikipedia.org)
  • The BIS produces anxiety and inhibits ongoing behavior in the presence of novel events, innate fear stimuli, and signals of nonreward or punishment. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Chronic tic disorder was either single or multiple, motor or phonic tics (but not both), which were present for more than a year. (wikipedia.org)