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  • Gaussian
  • It is a refined point source Gaussian air quality model for use in all stability conditions (i.e., all conditions of atmospheric turbulence) for complex terrain. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxins
  • This includes assessing health and environmental risks from: Carcinogens Reproductive toxins Air pollutants Pesticides Chemical contaminants in food and water Chemical exposures in the workplace Climate change in California In May 2009, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger proposed to "eliminate and transfer the functions" of OEHHA (and other agencies) as part his May Revise for the 2009-2010 budget. (wikipedia.org)
  • The information also shows that the lower-income and minority groups emit a greater percentage of toxins and pollutants than others. (wikipedia.org)
  • hazardous chemicals
  • The process, if not well controlled, can release a worrisome mix of hazardous chemicals into the air and water, although what exactly is discharged, and how that varies site to site, is just beginning to be understood. (purdue.edu)
  • The hazardous chemicals used at the CPS Madison Industries' superfund site consisted of volatile organic compounds (VOC), as well as zinc sulfate and copper compounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • roadway
  • In seeing the need to develop a line source model to approach the study of roadway air pollution, Michael Hogan and Richard Venti developed a closed form solution to integrating the point source equation in a series of publications. (wikipedia.org)
  • sediments
  • Environmental Compartments: Equilibria and Assessment of Processes Between Air, Water, Sediments and Biota pdf free by Prof. Dr. Egbert K. Duursma, Dr. JoLynn Carroll (auth. (pdf.to)
  • In order to achieve viable solutions to present-day environmental problems, professionals must understand the spatial and temporal links which exist between the different environmental compartments of biota, air, water, and land and aquatic sediments. (pdf.to)
  • climate change
  • 2015) The history of ragweed in the world (co-author, 2015) Modelling the introduction and spread of non-native species: International trade and climate change drive ragweed invasion (co-author, 2016) Biogeographical estimates of allergenic pollen transport over regional scales: common ragweed and Szeged, Hungary as a test case (co-author, 2016) International Journal of Environment and Pollution, Special Issue: „Air Pollution" (2007-2009). (wikipedia.org)
  • The rise in global environmental issues such as air and water pollution, climate change, overflowing landfills and clearcutting have all lead to increased government regulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many Volatile Organic Compounds are hazardous air pollutants that can contribute to climate change. (wikipedia.org)
  • gases
  • Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency, 549 U.S. 497 (2007), is a 5-4 U.S. Supreme Court case in which twelve states and several cities of the United States brought suit against the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to force that federal agency to regulate carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) as pollutants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Petitioners argued that the use of 'including' automatically means greenhouse gases are part of the first group, 'any air pollution agent' which was not separately defined. (wikipedia.org)
  • Water
  • Purdue University assistant professor Andrew Whelton (left) says that although a process of repairing storm water culverts has been used for approximately 30 years, still not much is known about the chemicals released into the water during the repairs. (purdue.edu)
  • Andrew Whelton, associate professor of civil engineering and environmental and ecological engineering, says many states and municipalities are beginning to re-examine how CIPP is used and lessen the potential harm to nearby water and air. (purdue.edu)
  • State transportation agencies want to repair their infrastructure without having to worry about fish kills, drinking water contamination, or chemical incident cleanup,' he says. (purdue.edu)
  • Pulp and paper mills contribute to air, water and land pollution and discarded paper and paperboard make up roughly 26% of solid municipal solid waste in landfill sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States the pulp and paper industry released about 79, 000 tonnes or about 5% of all industrial pollutant releases in 2015 Of this total waste released by the pulp and paper industry in the U.S., 66% was released into the air, 10% into water and 24% onto land whereas in Canada, most of the waste (96%) was released into the air. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposures
  • Regulatory agencies are under increased pressure to consider broader public health concerns that extend to multiple pollutant exposures, multiple exposure pathways, and vulnerable populations. (mdpi.com)
  • The integration of non-chemical stressors into a cumulative risk assessment framework has been largely driven by evidence of health disparities across different segments of society that may also bear a disproportionate risk from chemical exposures. (mdpi.com)
  • refineries
  • ExxonMobil says Harvey has damaged at least two of its refineries, causing thousands of pounds of chemicals to be released into the air. (democracynow.org)
  • That report includes the emission factors developed by the EPA for petroleum refineries and for the synthetic organic chemical industry (SOCMI). (wikipedia.org)
  • Oil refineries are typically large, sprawling industrial complexes with extensive piping running throughout, carrying streams of fluids between large chemical processing units, such as distillation columns. (wikipedia.org)
  • In many ways, oil refineries use much of the technology of, and can be thought of, as types of chemical plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • pounds
  • According to the Environmental Defense Fund, more than 1 million pounds of air pollution have been released into the air as petrochemical plants were forced to shut down by the storm. (democracynow.org)
  • toxic chemicals
  • However, the pollution information site Scorecard provides data of the health of the counties in New York, revealing that the release of hazardous air pollutants, lead or other toxic chemicals into the air varies depending on categories such as race/ethnicity, income, poverty, education, job, and home ownership. (wikipedia.org)
  • The right-to-know is one's right to receive information about the annual releases of toxic chemicals by industrial facilities across the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Homeowners in New York emit a larger percentage of toxic chemicals into the environment than renters do, since those who own homes require more energy use. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a publicly available database maintained by the EPA's TRI Program that tracks the management in the U.S. of certain toxic chemicals that may pose a threat to human health and the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • reactions
  • Completely revised and updated to include new analytical techniques as well as additional chemical structures and reactions, this second edition retains the features - clarity of prose, pertinent examples, and authoritative coverage of a wide range of toxic pollutants - that made the first edition a bestseller. (pdf.to)
  • Taking the example of the global warming phenomena, physicists create computer models of atmospheric circulation and infra-red radiation transmission, chemists examine the inventory of atmospheric chemicals and their reactions, biologists analyze the plant and animal contributions to carbon dioxide fluxes, and specialists such as meteorologists and oceanographers add additional breadth in understanding the atmospheric dynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • methodologies
  • The main objective of the book is to contribute to the existing knowledge and practical application of modern technologies for exposure and risk assessment of chemical environmental pollution with emphasis on methodologies and the models used for environm. (pdf.to)
  • risk assessment
  • Specifically, cumulative risk assessment initiatives have stressed the importance of considering both chemical and non-chemical stressors, such as socioeconomic status (SES) and related psychosocial stress, in evaluating health risks. (mdpi.com)
  • Overall, while there have been significant advances, further developments across all of the risk assessment stages ( i.e. , hazard identification, exposure assessment, dose-response, and risk characterization) are necessary to provide a scientific basis for regulatory actions and effective community interventions, particularly when considering non-chemical stressors. (mdpi.com)
  • section
  • Section 111(c)(1) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) authorizes EPA to delegate authority to any state agency which submits adequate regulatory procedures for implementation and enforcement of the NSPS program. (epa.gov)
  • The fugitive air pollutant emission factors from relief valves, piping valves, open-ended piping lines or drains, piping flanges, sample connections, and seals on pump and compressor shafts are discussed and included the report EPA-458/R-95-017, "Protocol for Equipment Leak Emission Estimates" which is included in the Chapter 5 section of AP 42. (wikipedia.org)
  • example
  • Ecology could be considered a subset of environmental science, which also could involve purely chemical or public health issues (for example) ecologists would be unlikely to study. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scorecard has documented that the risk of cancer from New York County hazardous air pollutants in each category was almost always the same for each side of the spectrum (kids below poverty and kids above poverty, for example). (wikipedia.org)
  • An example of a regional air pollution problem is a multi-state area where ozone or fine particulate levels exceed the US health standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • for example, the pollutant sulfur dioxide in air can be measured using its infrared absorption characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • carcinogen
  • As part of her research, Kyungyeon found that although styrene - suspected to be a carcinogen - was the chemical most often reported in the 13 incidents studied, acetone, benzene, trimethylbenzenes, among others, were also sometimes found. (purdue.edu)
  • Of the releases to air by the pulp and paper industry, 60% were methanol which is not a persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic (PBT) chemical and is not a carcinogen. (wikipedia.org)
  • risks
  • The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, commonly referred to as OEHHA (pronounced oh-EEE-ha), is a specialized department within the cabinet-level California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) with responsibility for evaluating health risks from environmental chemical contaminants. (wikipedia.org)
  • quality
  • This comes as state officials shut off air quality monitors to protect them from storm-related damage, and are relying on facilities to self-report any toxic fumes they release. (democracynow.org)
  • Iowa Department of Natural Resources Air Quality Bureau, Wallace State Office Building, 502 E. 9th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50319. (epa.gov)
  • OBODM - A model for evaluating the air quality impacts of the open burning and detonation (OB/OD) of obsolete munitions and solid propellants. (wikipedia.org)
  • CMAQ may also refer to the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program, a program of the United States Department of Transportation. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also has air quality services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The air quality activities conducted by the Institute include: Research, testing and development of air quality measuring methods and equipment. (wikipedia.org)
  • health
  • Linda Schenk, "Risk Perception and Its Foundation among Swedish Individuals Occupationally Exposed to Air Pollutants and Chemicals: A Comparison of 1975 and 2011," ISRN Public Health , vol. 2013, Article ID 469714, 8 pages, 2013. (hindawi.com)
  • Essential information about the health and environmental hazards associated with more than 25 chemicals, materials and products commonly found in the home. (mass.gov)
  • To estimate the effects of aerosols on health and climate, it is essential to know their chemical composition. (environmental-expert.com)
  • The AP 42 Compilation of Air Pollutant Emission Factors, was first published by the US Public Health Service in 1968. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surface
  • Go, multiply, and subdue the earth and take dominion over every bird of the air and every fish of the sea and every living thing that moves on the surface of the earth. (berkeley.edu)
  • The gas is drawn through the bags, either on the inside or the outside depending on cleaning method, and a layer of dust accumulates on the filter media surface until air can no longer move through it. (wikipedia.org)
  • emissions
  • WASHINGTON, D.C. - January 21, 2010) The United States today filed two major Clean Air Act settlements to reduce air emissions from container glass and Portland cement plants throughout the country, announced Cynthia Giles, assistant administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance and Ignacia S. Moreno, Assistant Attorney General for the Environment and Natural Resources Division. (epa.gov)
  • organic
  • In that same article, I discuss that beyond the chemical toxins mold produces (mycotoxins) to lay claim on that piece of decaying matter, there are a whole host of other inflammagens that mold and bacteria emit that make a person with CIRS sick - Beta Glucans, Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC), Lipopolysaccharides (LPS), etc. (biotoxinjourney.com)
  • The key to the design of an ultra selective chemical sensor requires the recognition of an organic or inorganic substrate by an immobilized receptor molecule generating a surface host-guest product. (ox.ac.uk)
  • A polar organic chemical integrative sampler (POCIS) is a passive sampling device which allows for the in situ collection of a time-integrated average of hydrophilic organic contaminants developed by researchers with the United States Geological Survey in Columbia, Missouri. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the global emission of bioconcentratable persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was shown to result in adverse ecological effects, industry developed a wide range of increasing water-soluble, polar hydrophilic organic compounds (HpOCs) to replace them. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 1995 analysis of the air from a new Lincoln Continental found over 50 volatile organic compounds, which were identified as coming from sources such as cleaning and lubricating compounds, paint, carpeting, leather and vinyl treatments, latex glue, and gasoline and exhaust fumes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A more recent study in Japan found that the volatile organic chemicals in a new minivan were over 35 times the health limit the day after its delivery. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast to many persitent organic pollutants, TPHP has limited affinity for lipids. (wikipedia.org)
  • fuels
  • The geography of Cubatão prevented rapid dispersal of air pollutants released from the burning fuels. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, its low energy content of 19.7 MJ/kg and stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratio of 6.42:1 mean that fuel consumption (on volume or mass bases) will be higher than hydrocarbon fuels. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • Chung Y, Dominici F, Wang Y, Coull BA, Bell ML. Associations between long-term exposure to chemical constituents of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mortality in Medicare enrollees in the eastern United States. (springer.com)
  • For residents of the Aral sea region living there has led to high "exposure to industrial pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) compounds and heavy metals but also to pesticides. (wikipedia.org)
  • compounds
  • Researchers tested more than 200 U.S. vehicles of model years 2011-2012 for chemicals such as organobromine compounds (associated with brominated flame retardants, or BFRs), organochlorine compounds (e.g., polyvinyl chloride, or PVC), and heavy metals that off-gas from various parts such as the steering wheel, dashboard, armrests and seats. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over sixty chemical compounds were identified inside the interiors of the four vehicles in this study. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxic
  • In 1998, nearly all aquatic life for seven miles was killed when over 1,300 gallons of a toxic chemical were spilled. (fws.gov)
  • Chemicals found in the cars included the carcinogen benzene, two other possible carcinogens cyclohexanone and styrene, and several other toxic chemicals. (wikipedia.org)
  • The European Chemicals agency considers TPhP to be "very toxic" to aquatic life, with potentially long-lasting effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2014, the United States Environmental Protection Agency added TPhP to its list of Toxic Substance Control Act Work Plan for Chemicals on the basis that the compound has exhibited "acute and chronic aquatic toxicity," "moderate bioaccumulation potential," and "moderate environmental persistence. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxygen
  • Air is the source of the oxygen that is necessary for normal existence of the overwhelming majority of living organisms. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Due to its electronegativity, oxygen forms stable chemical bonds with almost all elements to give the corresponding oxides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though solid magnesium and aluminium react slowly with oxygen at STP-they, like most metals, burn in air, generating very high temperatures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finely
  • Finely grained powders of most metals can be dangerously explosive in air. (wikipedia.org)
  • Into the air thus compressed is then gradually introduced from the exterior finely divided fuel, which ignites on introduction, since the air is at a temperature far above the igniting-point of the fuel. (wikipedia.org)
  • surface
  • Because the amount of chemical sampled is directly related to the sample surface area, it is sometimes necessary to combine extracts from multiple POCIS disks into one sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • As the sea dries up the contaminants become exposed on the surface and enter into the soil while also being blown into the air. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduce
  • A good integrated pest management system as well as an HVAC system that filters for common pollutants have been known to reduce the damage woodblock prints receive. (wikipedia.org)
  • fuel
  • Mankind has long obtained the heat necessary for life and productive activity by burning fuel in air. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • This contrasts with spark-ignition engines such as a petrol engine (gasoline engine) or gas engine (using a gaseous fuel as opposed to petrol), which use a spark plug to ignite an air-fuel mixture. (wikipedia.org)
  • School
  • 3 Decomposer Ecosystem Population Community Niche Pollutant Storm Drain Prey Decay Competition Balance in Ecosystems School (of fish) Stormwater Activities Lake Ecosystems 1. (docplayer.net)
  • International Civil Engineering Symposium (ICES), is an annual technical fest by SCALE(School of Civil and Chemical Engineering) of the Vellore Institute of Technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • HealthDay News) -- Women who live where the air is thick with pollutants may be more likely to have dense breasts, a known risk factor for breast cancer, new research suggests. (kctv5.com)
  • Solid state chemical sensors represent an exciting and innovative research area which has developed rapidly in the past 10 years. (ox.ac.uk)
  • risk
  • The German sociologist Ulrich Beck used the case of Vila Parisi ("The dirtiest chemical town in the world") as an example of the "destructive powers of the developed risk industry. (wikipedia.org)
  • further
  • Many traditions of Wicca apply Air to the East and further associate it with the color yellow and the elementals known as Sylphs. (thefreedictionary.com)