• toxins
  • This includes assessing health and environmental risks from: Carcinogens Reproductive toxins Air pollutants Pesticides Chemical contaminants in food and water Chemical exposures in the workplace Climate change in California In May 2009, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger proposed to "eliminate and transfer the functions" of OEHHA (and other agencies) as part his May Revise for the 2009-2010 budget. (wikipedia.org)
  • The information also shows that the lower-income and minority groups emit a greater percentage of toxins and pollutants than others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gaussian
  • It is a refined point source Gaussian air quality model for use in all stability conditions (i.e., all conditions of atmospheric turbulence) for complex terrain. (wikipedia.org)
  • roadway
  • In seeing the need to develop a line source model to approach the study of roadway air pollution, Michael Hogan and Richard Venti developed a closed form solution to integrating the point source equation in a series of publications. (wikipedia.org)
  • gases
  • This is because in such environments, workers are exposed to extreme temperatures, dust, volatile chemicals and invisible, explosive gases. (environmental-expert.com)
  • Massachusetts v. Environmental Protection Agency, 549 U.S. 497 (2007), is a 5-4 U.S. Supreme Court case in which twelve states and several cities of the United States brought suit against the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to force that federal agency to regulate carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) as pollutants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Petitioners argued that the use of 'including' automatically means greenhouse gases are part of the first group, 'any air pollution agent' which was not separately defined. (wikipedia.org)
  • Soil
  • As the industrial revolution gathered momentum in the middle of the 19th century, human activities of many sorts added more and more substances to those that circulate naturally among the air, water, soil, and all living things. (berkeley.edu)
  • Other abiotic factors Nutrient imbalances: deficiencies, chemicals (toxic salts, herbicides, air pollutants) Stemflow which can concentrate dry deposits which via soil acidification can kill surrounding plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathways
  • Regulatory agencies are under increased pressure to consider broader public health concerns that extend to multiple pollutant exposures, multiple exposure pathways, and vulnerable populations. (mdpi.com)
  • Acetaldehyde
  • Acetaldehyde (systematic name ethanal) is an organic chemical compound with the formula CH3CHO, sometimes abbreviated by chemists as MeCHO (Me = methyl). (wikipedia.org)
  • exposures
  • The integration of non-chemical stressors into a cumulative risk assessment framework has been largely driven by evidence of health disparities across different segments of society that may also bear a disproportionate risk from chemical exposures. (mdpi.com)
  • biological
  • A better understanding of the biological underpinnings of social stress on disease and implications for chemical-based dose-response relationships is needed. (mdpi.com)
  • Environmental issues almost always include an interaction of physical, chemical, and biological processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indoor
  • 2. Which of the following best describes the relationship between energy efficient buildings and indoor air pollution? (tamu.edu)
  • toxic chemicals
  • The right-to-know is one's right to receive information about the annual releases of toxic chemicals by industrial facilities across the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Homeowners in New York emit a larger percentage of toxic chemicals into the environment than renters do, since those who own homes require more energy use. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a publicly available database maintained by the EPA's TRI Program that tracks the management in the U.S. of certain toxic chemicals that may pose a threat to human health and the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Water
  • n water-insoluble, saturated hydrocarbon compound, with the general chemical formula C n H 2n+2 . (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The rise in global environmental issues such as air and water pollution, climate change, overflowing landfills and clearcutting have all lead to increased government regulations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pulp and paper mills contribute to air, water and land pollution and discarded paper and paperboard make up roughly 26% of solid municipal solid waste in landfill sites. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States the pulp and paper industry released about 79, 000 tonnes or about 5% of all industrial pollutant releases in 2015 Of this total waste released by the pulp and paper industry in the U.S., 66% was released into the air, 10% into water and 24% onto land whereas in Canada, most of the waste (96%) was released into the air. (wikipedia.org)
  • transport
  • 2015) The history of ragweed in the world (co-author, 2015) Modelling the introduction and spread of non-native species: International trade and climate change drive ragweed invasion (co-author, 2016) Biogeographical estimates of allergenic pollen transport over regional scales: common ragweed and Szeged, Hungary as a test case (co-author, 2016) International Journal of Environment and Pollution, Special Issue: „Air Pollution" (2007-2009). (wikipedia.org)
  • dust
  • Dust-laden gas or air enters the baghouse through hoppers (large funnel-shaped containers used for storing and dispensing particulate) and is directed into the baghouse compartment. (wikipedia.org)
  • The gas is drawn through the bags, either on the inside or the outside depending on cleaning method, and a layer of dust accumulates on the filter media surface until air can no longer move through it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bags are cleaned by injecting clean air into the dust collector in a reverse direction, which pressurizes the compartment. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemists
  • Taking the example of the global warming phenomena, physicists create computer models of atmospheric circulation and infra-red radiation transmission, chemists examine the inventory of atmospheric chemicals and their reactions, biologists analyze the plant and animal contributions to carbon dioxide fluxes, and specialists such as meteorologists and oceanographers add additional breadth in understanding the atmospheric dynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • risks
  • Specifically, cumulative risk assessment initiatives have stressed the importance of considering both chemical and non-chemical stressors, such as socioeconomic status (SES) and related psychosocial stress, in evaluating health risks. (mdpi.com)
  • The Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, commonly referred to as OEHHA (pronounced oh-EEE-ha), is a specialized department within the cabinet-level California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) with responsibility for evaluating health risks from environmental chemical contaminants. (wikipedia.org)
  • example
  • Additionally, we present a summary of studies of potential interactions between social stressors and air pollutants on health as an example of current research that supports the incorporation of non-chemical stressors into risk assessment. (mdpi.com)
  • Ecology could be considered a subset of environmental science, which also could involve purely chemical or public health issues (for example) ecologists would be unlikely to study. (wikipedia.org)
  • An example of a regional air pollution problem is a multi-state area where ozone or fine particulate levels exceed the US health standards. (wikipedia.org)
  • for example, the pollutant sulfur dioxide in air can be measured using its infrared absorption characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • section
  • There are 188 HAPs specified in Section 112 of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. (environmental-expert.com)
  • The fugitive air pollutant emission factors from relief valves, piping valves, open-ended piping lines or drains, piping flanges, sample connections, and seals on pump and compressor shafts are discussed and included the report EPA-458/R-95-017, "Protocol for Equipment Leak Emission Estimates" which is included in the Chapter 5 section of AP 42. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • NECESSITY, FUNCTION, AND CONFORMITY: KRS 224.10-100(5) authorizes the cabinet to promulgate administrative regulations for the prevention, abatement, and control of air pollution. (ky.gov)
  • By Chemisch Thermische Prozesstechnik GmbH / CTP Air Pollution Control based in Graz, AUSTRIA . (environmental-expert.com)
  • By ERG (Air Pollution Control) Ltd based in Horsham, UNITED KINGDOM . (environmental-expert.com)
  • Significant quantities of air pollutants are emitted from each plant, although considerable resources are expended in applying Best Available Control Technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Earth Metrics study found, in particular, that requirements of the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District would be met by the proposed facility design. (wikipedia.org)
  • A baghouse (BH, B/H), bag filter (BF) or fabric filter (FF) is an air pollution control device that removes particulates out of air or gas released from commercial processes or combustion for electricity generation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Power plants, steel mills, pharmaceutical producers, food manufacturers, chemical producers and other industrial companies often use baghouses to control emission of air pollutants. (wikipedia.org)
  • quality
  • OBODM - A model for evaluating the air quality impacts of the open burning and detonation (OB/OD) of obsolete munitions and solid propellants. (wikipedia.org)
  • CMAQ may also refer to the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program, a program of the United States Department of Transportation. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also has air quality services. (wikipedia.org)
  • The air quality activities conducted by the Institute include: Research, testing and development of air quality measuring methods and equipment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surface
  • Go, multiply, and subdue the earth and take dominion over every bird of the air and every fish of the sea and every living thing that moves on the surface of the earth. (berkeley.edu)