• Calcium
  • When used properly in response to a diagnosis of harm from metal toxicity, side effects of chelation therapy include dehydration, low blood calcium, harm to kidneys, increased enzymes as would be detected in liver function tests, allergic reactions, and lowered levels of dietary elements. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemotherapy
  • Some people have a history of exposure to chemotherapy (especially alkylating agents such as melphalan, cyclophosphamide, busulfan, and chlorambucil) or radiation (therapeutic or accidental), or both (e.g., at the time of stem cell transplantation for another disease). (wikipedia.org)
  • arsenic-based chemical warfa
  • citation needed] Its original name reflects its origins as a compound secretly developed by British biochemists at Oxford University during World War II as an antidote for lewisite, a now-obsolete arsenic-based chemical warfare agent. (wikipedia.org)
  • metals
  • clarification needed] There are a variety of common chelating agents with differing affinities for different metals, physical characteristics, and biological mechanism of action. (wikipedia.org)
  • lead
  • Following World War II, chelation therapy was used to treat workers who had painted United States naval vessels with lead-based paints. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 1950s, Norman Clarke, Sr. was treating workers at a battery factory for lead poisoning when he noticed that some of his patients had improved angina pectoris following chelation therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a provider is performing a provocative excretion test, or "chelation challenge", a measurement obtained from urine rather than blood is likely to provide a more accurate representation of total lead burden to a skilled interpreter. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mainstays of treatment are removal from the source of lead and, for precious animals who have significantly high blood lead levels or who have symptoms of poisoning, chelation therapy with a chelating agent. (wikipedia.org)
  • relaxation
  • Gadolinium salts are of primary interest for relaxation agents in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). (wikipedia.org)
  • To generate the relaxation agents, Gd3+ sources such as GdCl3∙6H2O are converted to coordination complexes. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Chelation therapy has a long history of use in clinical toxicology and remains in use for some very specific medical treatments, although it is administered under very careful medical supervision due to various inherent risks. (wikipedia.org)
  • side
  • Barbara Sonnenburg asked Peggy Adkins whether the treatments were chelation treatments and whether there were any side effects from those treatments. (cdc.gov)
  • No side effects from the chelation were reported with the exception of feeling ill immediately after the "BAL" shot. (cdc.gov)
  • Chelation therapy must be administered with care as it has a number of possible side effects, including death. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapy to remove
  • After a portion of the videotape had been viewed the Subcommittee heard discussion from members of the Subcommittee and the public regarding their personal experiences with chelation therapy to remove contaminants from their bodies. (cdc.gov)
  • View
  • 2) The growth of the bacterium was supported also by autoclaving glucose in the medium, and the active factor produced in the medium was speculated to be a chelating agent in view of other literature reports. (go.jp)
  • patients
  • Clarke subsequently administered chelation therapy to patients with angina pectoris and other occlusive vascular disease and published his findings in The American Journal of the Medical Sciences in December 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • The chelation therapy began approximately a year and a half after exposure. (cdc.gov)
  • MDS after exposure to radiation or Alkylating agents such as busulfan, nitrosourea, or procarbazine, typically occurs 3-7 years after exposure and frequently demonstrates loss of chromosome 5 or 7. (wikipedia.org)
  • administration
  • However, no such evidence supporting their use for these condition has yet been found and in 2010 the United States Food and Drugs Administration announced that over the counter chelation products are unapproved and that their sale is a violation of federal law. (news-medical.net)
  • The academy trains and certifies physicians in the safe administration of chelation therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Uses
  • Fe3+ chelation with the Dopa residues in mussel foot protein-1 to improve the strength of the threads that it uses to secure itself to surfaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • contrast
  • Chelation to the conjugate base of this ligand increases the solubility of the Gd3+ at the body's neutral pH and still allows for the paramagnetic effect required for an MRI contrast agent. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • Many microbial species produce water-soluble pigments that serve as chelating agents, termed siderophores. (wikipedia.org)
  • GdCl3∙6H2O can not be used as an MRI contrasting agent due to its low solubility in water at the body's near neutral pH. (wikipedia.org)