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  • kilns
  • Even in ancient times, charcoal was manufactured in kilns. (wikipedia.org)
  • The process took six to eight days - in large kilns several weeks - during which time the charcoal burner had to control the draught (by piercing small holes and resealing them), being careful neither to allow the pile to go out nor let it go up in flames. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Frisco Charcoal Kilns are remnants of silver mining in the Utah ghost town of Frisco. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charcoal-fueled smelting in both pits and kilns had been used in Utah since at least 1872. (wikipedia.org)
  • The five granite beehive-shaped charcoal smelting kilns that have survived in Frisco were created by the Frisco Mining and Smelting Company under the supervision of Benjamin Y. Hampton, primarily for the Horn Silver Mine, between 1877 and 1880 for $500-$1000 apiece. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2016
  • As of January 2016, Kingsford Charcoal contains the following ingredients: Wood char - Fuel for heating Mineral char - Fuel for heating Mineral carbon - Fuel for heating Limestone - Binding agent Starch - Binding agent Borax - Release agent Sawdust - Speed up ignition The raw materials, primarily wood waste from regional sawmills, are delivered to the factory. (wikipedia.org)
  • conical
  • Historically, the production of wood charcoal in locations where there is an abundance of wood dates back to a very ancient period, and generally consists of piling billets of wood on their ends so as to form a conical pile, openings being left at the bottom to admit air, with a central shaft to serve as a flue. (wikipedia.org)
  • absorption
  • There are few studies to support these uses and there are also concerns that frequent use of charcoal may decrease absorption of essential nutrients, especially in children. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Absorption of moisture from the humidity of the air itself is rapid and there is, with time, a gain of moisture which even without any rain wetting can bring the moisture content to about 5 to 10%, even in well-burned charcoal. (fao.org)
  • Active charcoal binds the poison and prevents its absorption by the gastrointestinal tract. (wikipedia.org)
  • medicinal
  • Vegetable Charcoal: Its Medicinal and Economic Properties with Practical Remarks on Its Use in Chronic Affections of the Stomach and Bowels, published in 1857, recommends charcoal biscuits as an excellent method of administering charcoal to children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vegetable Charcoal: Its Medicinal and Economic Properties with Practical Remarks on Its Use in Chronic Affections of the Stomach and Bowels. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxins
  • Activated charcoal is a potent natural treatment used to trap toxins and chemicals in the body, allowing them to be flushed out so the body doesn't reabsorb them. (draxe.com)
  • The porous surface of activated charcoal has a negative electric charge that causes positive charged toxins and gas to bond with it. (draxe.com)
  • Barbecue charcoal is loaded with toxins and chemicals, and should never be consumed. (draxe.com)
  • In addition to being a safe and effective treatment for poisonings and the removal of toxins from the system, additional activated charcoal uses include deodorizing and disinfecting, and it's an important step to cure Lyme disease. (draxe.com)
  • Activated charcoal removes these toxins. (draxe.com)
  • However, charcoal was almost forgotten until 15 years ago when it was rediscovered as a wonderful oral agent to treat most overdoses and toxins. (encyclopedia.com)
  • made
  • It's made from a variety of sources, but when used for natural healing, it's important to select activated charcoal made from coconut shells or other natural sources. (draxe.com)
  • countable ) A drawing made with charcoal. (wiktionary.org)
  • Saxelby Cheesemongers' new Bone Char Pearl is made in Maine, aged in Brooklyn, and coated in animal-bone charcoal from Blue Hill at Stone Barns. (nymag.com)
  • Activated charcoal is a fine black odorless and tasteless powder made from wood or other materials that have been exposed to very high temperatures in an airless environment. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Wicked Good Charcoal is super dense carbonized lump wood made from five different kinds of Brazilian timber certified by the Forest Stewardship Council. (treehugger.com)
  • made at higher temperatures it is hard and brittle, and does not fire until heated to about 700 °C (1,292 °F). In Finland and Scandinavia, the charcoal was considered the by-product of wood tar production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charcoal has been made by various methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • In modern times charcoal biscuits are made in the form of crackers to accompany cheeses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artists' charcoal is a form of dry art medium made of finely ground organic materials that are held together by a gum or wax binder or produced without the use of binders by eliminating the oxygen inside the material during the production process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Raw bamboo charcoal is made of bamboo plant parts such as culms, branches, and roots. (wikipedia.org)
  • ingredient
  • Burger King is using bamboo charcoal as an ingredient in its cheese for a new promotional burger in Japan called the Kuro Pearl and Kuro Ninja burgers. (wikipedia.org)
  • lump
  • Cooking with this lump charcoal is about the closest you'll get to chopping down your own tree. (nymag.com)
  • gastric
  • Research shows that activated charcoal works better than stomach pumping (gastric lavage) in some situations. (draxe.com)
  • accidental
  • It is virtually impossible to prevent some accidental rain wetting of charcoal during transport to the market but good practice is to store charcoal under cover even if it has been bought on a volume basis, since the water it contains must be evaporated on burning and represents a direct loss of heating power. (fao.org)
  • chefs
  • As restaurants move toward techniques that are ever more heritage-focused, many chefs are taking a long hard look at their charcoal and coming up with some serious alternatives. (nymag.com)
  • Charcoal Chefs is a Canadian cooking television series which aired on CBC Television from 1976 to 1978. (wikipedia.org)
  • furnace
  • Efficiency in use normally means transferring the maximum amount of the heat content of the charcoal to the object to be heated, be it water for cooking, the air of a room, or the charge in a blast furnace. (fao.org)
  • There is evidence that charcoal with a high moisture content (10% or more) tends to shatter and produce fines when heated in the blast furnace, making it undesirable in the production of pig iron. (fao.org)
  • The traditional Japanese tatara furnace uses charcoal and ironsand to produce a mixture of iron and steel. (wikipedia.org)
  • particles
  • The advantage of using charcoal instead of just burning wood is the removal of the water and other components, which allows charcoal to burn to a higher temperature, and the fact that the product of its combustion is mainly carbon dioxide, resulting in very little smoke (regular wood gives off a good amount of steam and unburnt carbon particles - soot - in its smoke). (wikipedia.org)
  • page needed] In the renaissance, Charcoal was widely used, but few works of art survived due to charcoal particles flaking off the canvas. (wikipedia.org)
  • Barbecue
  • When charcoal is exported, buyers tend to make use of these industrial quality specifications even though the main outlet of the imported charcoal may well be the domestic cooking or barbecue market. (fao.org)
  • suitable
  • This factor should be borne in mind since industrial and domestic requirements are not always the same and an intelligent appraisal of actual market quality requirements may allow supply of suitable charcoal at a lower price or in greater quantities beneficial to both buyer and seller. (fao.org)
  • often
  • One activated charcoal use often overlooked is to alleviate uncomfortable gas and bloating. (draxe.com)
  • Charcoal holds heat longer than wood, and you can also light it when it is still slightly damp, so it often functions as a good backup when you are camping in wet conditions with a lack of dry wood to burn. (ehow.com)
  • Where charcoal is sold by weight, keeping the moisture content high by wetting with water is often practised by dishonest dealers. (fao.org)
  • These charcoals are often used by artists for their versatile properties, such as the rough texture that leaves marks less permanent than other art media. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fixatives are often used with charcoal drawings to solidify the position to prevent erasing or rubbing off of charcoal dusts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Designed to be similar to graphite pencils while maintaining most of the properties of charcoal, they are often used for fine and crisp detailed drawings, while keeping the user's hand from being marked. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charcoal was often a key component of Cave painting, with examples dating back to at least 28,000 years ago. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • Whenever you take activated charcoal, it's imperative to drink 12-16 glasses of water per day. (draxe.com)
  • Activated charcoal can cause dehydration if adequate amounts of water aren't consumed in tandem. (draxe.com)
  • Follow with an additional glass of water immediately thereafter to help get the charcoal into your system, where it can bind with gas-producing elements. (draxe.com)
  • Even before the discovery of America by Europeans, Native Americans used powdered charcoal mixed with water to treat an upset stomach. (encyclopedia.com)
  • If a piece of charcoal be thrown into putrid water, the putrid taste or.flavor will b" destroyed, and the water be rendered completely fresh. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The volume and appearance of charcoal is hardly changed by addition of water. (fao.org)
  • The volatile matter other than water in charcoal comprises all those liquid and tarry residues not fully driven off in the process of carbonization. (fao.org)
  • black
  • Bone black , also called Bone Char , or Bone Charcoal , a form of charcoal produced by heating bone in the presence of a limited amount of air. (britannica.com)
  • Charcoal Charlie, is an album by Pablove Black originally released in 1986. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charcoal can produce lines that are very light or intensely black, while being easily removable, yet vulnerable to leaving stains on paper. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many artists use charcoal because of its unique dark black strokes. (wikipedia.org)
  • coal
  • The first part of the word is of obscure origin, but the first use of the term "coal" in English was as a reference to charcoal. (princeton.edu)
  • With the increasing use of stone coal from the 18th century, the charcoal burning industry declined. (wikipedia.org)
  • powder
  • Effects of dietary bamboo charcoal powder including vinegar liquid on growth performance and histological intestinal change in aigamo ducks" (PDF). (wikipedia.org)
  • form
  • On the other hand, large users such as the charcoal iron industry know from their operating experience and research, the properties they seek in charcoal and have the means in the form of concentrated buying power and control over at least a part of their own charcoal production, to ensure that the charcoal they use conforms to their specification and produces pig iron at minimum overall cost. (fao.org)
  • usually
  • Charcoal quality can be specified and measured in various ways which are usually derived from the various end use requirements. (fao.org)
  • Quality specifications for charcoal usually limit the moisture content to around 5-15% of the gross weight of the charcoal. (fao.org)
  • Menu
  • Charcoal was the default menu font in Apple Computer's Mac OS 8 and 9, replacing the relatively harder-to-read Chicago as part of the new Platinum interface. (wikipedia.org)
  • Properties
  • The quality of charcoal is defined by various properties and though all are interrelated to a certain extent, they are measured and appraised separately. (fao.org)
  • uses
  • One of the most popular activated charcoal uses is for the safe and effective treatment of poisoning and drug overdoses. (draxe.com)
  • The reasons are that performance cannot be measured easily, the power of consumers as individuals to specify and obtain good quality charcoal is minimal and there is a certain trade-off possible between price and quality which the household consumer uses to obtain satisfactory results. (fao.org)
  • production
  • The massive production of charcoal (at its height employing hundreds of thousands, mainly in Alpine and neighbouring forests) was a major cause of deforestation, especially in Central Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • wood
  • A person who manufactured charcoal was formerly known as a collier (also as a wood collier). (princeton.edu)
  • Provided it does not become unwieldy and bureaucratically counterproductive, a system of quality guidelines for household charcoal is a worthwhile step in ensuring maximum yield from the wood resource, nevertheless giving adequate household performance. (fao.org)
  • More than 1 million tons of wood scraps are converted into charcoal briquets annually. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ford suggested that all wood scraps were to be processed into charcoal. (wikipedia.org)
  • The type of wood material and preparation method allow a variety of charcoal types and textures to be produced. (wikipedia.org)
  • Charcoal pencils consist of compressed charcoal enclosed in a jacket of wood. (wikipedia.org)
  • A charcoal pile is a carefully arranged pile of wood, covered by turf or other layer, inside which a fire is lit in order to produce charcoal. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Charcoal Filter (チャコールフィルター), also known as Charcofil or Chakofiru (チャコフィル) to their fans, is a Japanese male rock band. (wikipedia.org)
  • Activated charcoal, also known as activated carbon, is a medication used to treat poisonings that occurred by mouth. (wikipedia.org)