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  • risk
  • Decreased ICV may be a useful radiographic sign of ipsilateral acute ischemic stroke and a marker of a large cerebral territory at risk of infarction. (ahajournals.org)
  • angiogram
  • The history of cerebral angiography is discussed, extending from the first human angiogram in 1927 to the present time. (springer.com)
  • Darren B. Orbach, MD, PhD, Neurointerventional Radiologist at Children's Hospital Boston , explains the process of a cerebral angiogram and the role of image guidance and catheters. (wn.com)
  • All patient charts were retrospectively evaluated for brain MR imaging performed within the first 30 days after the angiogram to assess for silent emboli potentially related to angiography. (ajnr.org)
  • In the next set of trials, he achieved success using 25% sodium iodide solution on three patients, developing the first cerebral angiogram. (wikipedia.org)
  • arteries
  • The first part of the book describes the normal anatomy of the cerebral arteries and veins, with attention to morphological aspect, embryological development, function, and vascular territories. (springer.com)
  • A cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cerebral AVM, CAVM, cAVM) is an abnormal connection between the arteries and veins in the brain-specifically, an arteriovenous malformation in the cerebrum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cerebral arteries describe three main pairs of arteries and their branches, which perfuse the cerebrum of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • seizures
  • Along with hemangiomas, the malformations result in severe headaches, cerebral hemorrhages, vomiting, meningism, seizures, acute strokes or progressive neurological deficits due to acute or chronic ischaemia caused by arteriovenous shunting. (wikipedia.org)
  • vascular
  • citation needed] Prior to the advent of modern neuoroimaging techniques such as MRI and CT in the mid-1970s, cerebral angiographies were frequently employed as a tool to infer the existence and location of certain kinds of lesions and hematomas by looking for secondary vascular displacement caused by the mass effect related to these medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • AVMs
  • The extent of the central nervous system (CNS) features/symptoms of Bonnet-Dechaume-Blanc syndrome is highly dependent of the location of the cerebral AVMs and the extent of the malformation. (wikipedia.org)
  • A common method of grading cerebral AVMs is the Spetzler-Martin (SM) grade. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lateral
  • The MCA arises from the internal carotid and continues into the lateral sulcus where it then branches and projects to many parts of the lateral cerebral cortex. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Aim of this clinical study is to establish a novel technique, the so called intraoperative fluorescence angiography, for kidney graft perfusion visualization during the transplant procedur. (bioportfolio.com)
  • subarachnoid
  • Dandy also observed that air introduced into the subarachnoid space via lumbar spinal puncture could enter the cerebral ventricles and also demonstrate the cerebrospinal fluid compartments around the base of the brain and over its surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • catheters
  • Microscopic studies of the tips of two widely used 5-F polyethylene catheters have revealed a difference in configuration resulting in one of the catheters becoming markedly damaged during angiography. (osti.gov)
  • veins
  • The test involves injection into a vein (usually in the arm) of a radioopaque substance, and time is allowed for the bloodstream to carry it to the cerebral veins - at which point the scan is performed. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • In the subgroup of patients ( n = 40) who serendipitously underwent DWI within the first 30 days after cerebral angiography, the presence of new DWI hyperintensities found in territories explored during angiography was tabulated. (ajnr.org)
  • investigators
  • Investigators conduct a monocentric pilot study with the objective to determine the hemodynamic parameter of fluorescence angiography (slope, amplitude, saturation time ) best correlated w. (bioportfolio.com)
  • blood
  • Suspected mechanisms of seizure were a cerebral blood flow change induced by BTO and neurotoxicity of accumulated contrast medium. (scirp.org)
  • Intraoperative Fluorescence Cerebral Angiography by Laser Surgical Microscopy: Comparison With Xenon Microscopy and Simultaneous Observation of Cerebral Blood Flow and Surrounding Structures. (bioportfolio.com)
  • commonly
  • This segment is not identified in some earlier classifications, and lies between the commonly used Cavernous portion and Cerebral or Supraclinoid portion Ophthalmic, or supraclinoid segment, or C6 Communicating, or terminal segment, or C7 C6 and C7 together constitute the commonly used Cerebral or Supraclinoid portion Mnemonic for branches in skull: Please Let Children Consume Our Candy (first letter for each branch, in order). (wikipedia.org)
  • Fluorescein angiography is commonly used to diagnose the syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Decreased ICV may be a useful radiographic sign of ipsilateral acute ischemic stroke and a marker of a large cerebral territory at risk of infarction. (ahajournals.org)
  • posterior cerebr
  • In the case of occipitoparietal ischemia owing to occlusion of elements of either posterior cerebral artery, patients may display cortical blindness (which, rarely, can involve blindness that the patient denies having, as seen in Anton's Syndrome), yet display sparing of the macula. (wikipedia.org)
  • infarction
  • Cerebral edema and venous infarction may be apparent on any modality, but for the detection of the thrombus itself, the most commonly used tests are computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), both using various types of radiocontrast to perform a venogram and visualise the veins around the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, brain tissue (in cerebral infarction) does not store glycogen, and the heart (in myocardial infarction) is so specialized on aerobic metabolism that not enough energy can be liberated by lactate production to sustain its needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • arteries
  • 2D TOF techniques were applied to mouse lemurs because 3D techniques (that could be used for rodents) displayed only few arteries, probably because of the relatively low cerebral flow velocity in these animals. (ismrm.org)
  • A composite display of the circle of Willis is created with computer assistance, allowing accurate vessel identification and optimal data documentation of blood flow velocity and direction in the basal cerebral arteries. (ahajournals.org)
  • Fedor Krause attempted to surgically eliminate an arteriovenous malformation by ligating its feeding arteries in 1908 but Olivecrona appear, to have been the first to actually completely excise a cerebral arteriovenous malformation (AVM) in 1932 and later a cerebellar AVM in 1938. (vascularneurosurgery.com)
  • In human anatomy, the anterior communicating artery is a blood vessel of the brain that connects the left and right anterior cerebral arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • The anterior communicating artery connects the two anterior cerebral arteries across the commencement of the longitudinal fissure. (wikipedia.org)
  • Angiography or arteriography is a medical imaging technique used to visualize the inside, or lumen, of blood vessels and organs of the body, with particular interest in the arteries, veins and the heart chambers. (wikipedia.org)
  • cavernous
  • Cerebral cavernous malformations. (wikipedia.org)
  • This segment is not identified in some earlier classifications, and lies between the commonly used Cavernous portion and Cerebral or Supraclinoid portion Ophthalmic, or supraclinoid segment, or C6 Communicating, or terminal segment, or C7 C6 and C7 together constitute the commonly used Cerebral or Supraclinoid portion Mnemonic for branches in skull: Please Let Children Consume Our Candy (first letter for each branch, in order). (wikipedia.org)
  • aneurysms
  • This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918) Beck J, Rohde S, Berkefeld J, Seifert V, Raabe A. Size and location of ruptured and unruptured intracranial aneurysms measured by 3-dimensional rotational angiography. (wikipedia.org)
  • several
  • The technique was first developed in 1927 by the Portuguese physician and neurologist Egas Moniz at the University of Lisbon to provide contrasted x-ray cerebral angiography in order to diagnose several kinds of nervous diseases, such as tumors, artery disease and arteriovenous malformations. (wikipedia.org)
  • taken
  • For all structures except the heart, the images are usually taken using a technique called digital subtraction angiography or DSA. (wikipedia.org)