• embryonic stem cel
  • Professor Alison Murdoch, chair of the British Fertility Society and leader of the study, said that it helped when couples were given information on embryonic stem cell research and the issues it raises. (ivf.net)
  • Abortion rights advocates, advocates of embryonic stem cell research, and members of the fertility industry object to referring to the transfer as an "adoption" because they feel it gives an embryo the same status as a child. (wikipedia.org)
  • In May 2005, the House of Representatives voted 238-194 to loosen the limitations on federally funded embryonic stem-cell research - by allowing government-funded research on surplus frozen embryos from in vitro fertilization clinics to be used for stem cell research with the permission of donors - despite Bush's promise to veto if passed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Senate passed the first bill, 63-37, which would have made it legal for the Federal government to spend Federal money on embryonic stem cell research that uses embryos left over from in vitro fertilization procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • eggs
  • According to the charity Breast Cancer Care, 88 per cent of women under 45 were not referred to a fertility clinic to discuss the possibility of freezing eggs or embryos ahead of cancer treatment. (scotsman.com)
  • Not all eggs are capable of becoming healthy embryos. (org.in)
  • Distinguishing good eggs from the bad ones is a difficult task for fertility doctors. (org.in)
  • Studies conducted on mice revealed healthy eggs accumulate a large amount of zinc-50 per cent more than other important metals like iron-in healthy women to attain maturity and be ready for fertilisation. (org.in)
  • The main developments in ART have focused on manipulating the production of a woman's eggs through the admin istration of fertility drugs. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Currently around 50 per cent of fertilised eggs do not develop properly and experts believe that faulty genetic code could be responsible. (thenewamerican.com)
  • Indeed, at one of Europe's biggest fertility centres - the Brussels Centre for Reproductive Medicine in Belgium - only 7.6% of women have returned to thaw their eggs and try for a pregnancy. (ivf.net)
  • De Vos reported that these results in Brussels are in line with others from large fertility centres, of which one (in Valencia) recorded an ongoing pregnancy rate of 21%, and reflect the limitations of social egg freezing for women freezing eggs after the age of 35. (ivf.net)
  • But he warned that - as with any fertility treatment - egg quality declines markedly with age, and success rates will be lower than 33% in women freezing their eggs beyond this age. (ivf.net)
  • The PGD allows studying the DNA of eggs or embryos to select those that carry certain mutations for genetic diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • couples
  • Between 1991 and 2005, 1.2 million embryos were not used, from a total of more than two million embryos (2,137,924) created by specialists while assisting infertile couples in the UK to have babies. (ivf.net)
  • A survey of British couples undergoing IVF treatment suggests that many of them would be prepared to donate embryos not used in their own treatment for stem cell research purposes. (ivf.net)
  • In the survey, couples attending the Newcastle Fertility Centre were asked whether they would be prepared to donate their surplus embryos for stem cell research. (ivf.net)
  • Fifty-seven per cent of the couples, who were all provided with 'written information on the needs, uses and benefits of embryonic stem cells in medical research', said that they would donate their left-over IVF embryos. (ivf.net)
  • Despite the lower fertilization rates in cycles using aspirated sperm (fresh or frozen), this retrospective analysis also showed that most couples had sufficient embryos to reach embryo transfer. (infertile.com)
  • In 2003, Germany announced that it would be cutting its generous reimbursement of fertility treatment by 50% and in that year there was a sudden surge in the number of procedures from 84,819 in 2002 to 102,426 as couples rushed to take advantage of the existing funding arrangements. (medindia.net)
  • The availability of ART as measured by number of cycles per one million inhabitants is highest in Denmark, where couples are entitled to at least three free cycles of fertility treatment, with 2,128 cycles per million in 2004. (medindia.net)
  • In 1997, the agency created the first program in the United States to arrange for couples to adopt frozen embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • Female embryos were selectively transferred in five couples at risk of X-linked disease, resulting in two twins and one singleton pregnancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • oocytes
  • Analysis of 14 cases in which there was complete absence of spermatogenesis (Sertoli-cell-only spermatozoa) treated by TESA and CS revealed that 43 per cent of oocytes injected with sperms extracted from testicular tissue reached the two-pronuclei stage. (infertile.com)
  • PGD thus is an adjunct to assisted reproductive technology, and requires in vitro fertilization (IVF) to obtain oocytes or embryos for evaluation. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1991
  • The German embryo protection law, passed in 1991, stipulates that no more than three embryos can be created per cycle of IVF and all three, regardless of their quality, must be transferred to the patient's womb at one time, and cannot be frozen or discarded. (medindia.net)
  • Researchers
  • Researchers also questioned breast cancer oncologists, surgeons and nurses, and found that 35 per cent are not telling younger breast cancer patients at diagnosis how treatment could affect their fertility, leaving them completely unaware of the risks. (scotsman.com)
  • Researchers in the U.S. say that the common practice of storing fertilized embryos can provoke genetic changes that may develop into mental and behavioral disorders later in life. (bio-medicine.org)
  • implant
  • Lord Winston, a leading UK fertility expert, tempered the debate with a reminder that even nature is highly inefficient and 'pretty well all of us' have created embryos through unprotected intercourse that do not implant and develop. (ivf.net)
  • Many experts estimate that only half of naturally-conceived embryos successfully implant and women commonly discard microscopic unviable embryos without detection. (ivf.net)
  • frozen storage
  • The group is expected to highlight the costs - in both financial and medical terms - of twin births and to recommend that only one embryo at a time be transferred into women aged 35 or under - other embryos can be placed in frozen storage to be used at another time or if pregnancy is not achieved on the first attempt. (ivf.net)
  • Although embryos can, theoretically, survive indefinitely in frozen storage, as a practical reality someone must eventually decide on a permanent disposition for them. (wikipedia.org)
  • ICSI
  • The data confirms that the proportion of ICSI to IVF procedures has continued to move in favour of ICSI, with 166,711 ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) procedures (60 per cent) versus 114,512 IVF (in vitro fertilisation) procedures (40 per cent). (medindia.net)
  • parliamentary
  • Lord Alton of Liverpool, an anti-abortion Independent peer, requested the data provided by the Department of Health's minister whilst challenging the permitted creation and uses of unwanted embryos particularly for research during recent parliamentary debates on the Human Fertilisation and Embryology (HFE) Bill 2007, a bill designed to revise and modernise its 1990 predecessor. (ivf.net)
  • Last month, the parliamentary committee set up to examine the Bill gave its approval , recommending that the government relax the current ban on creating hybrid embryos. (theregister.co.uk)
  • stem
  • The third bill would encourage research that would isolate pluripotent, i.e., embryonic-like, stem cells without the destruction of human embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fishel demonstrated for the first time that human embryos secrete the pregnancy hormone hCG in a 1984 publication with Edwards and Chris Evans in Science that has been cited 196 times and identified by Outi Hovatta as the first description of the potential of IVF and stem cell technology in terms of medicinal benefit. (wikipedia.org)
  • decline
  • The United Nations Population Fund states that "Local fertility restrictions and spontaneous rapid fertility decline below replacement levels tend to compel parents who want both a son and a small family size to resort to sex selection. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • ONLY one in ten women diagnosed with breast cancer is being offered the chance to have fertility treatment, despite treatment for the disease leaving them potentially unable to have children, a study has found. (scotsman.com)
  • Samia al Qadhi, Breast Cancer Care chief executive, said: "Our research shows that too many younger breast cancer patients are being denied the chance to preserve their fertility before they start cancer treatment. (scotsman.com)
  • For the majority of younger women diagnosed with breast cancer, healthcare professionals are not discussing their fertility options before treatment. (scotsman.com)
  • Despite having a nursing background, I didn't fully realise the damaging impact treatment would have on my fertility. (scotsman.com)
  • Breast Cancer Care also found that 60 per cent of women are unaware that infertility is a possibility after chemotherapy treatment for breast cancer. (scotsman.com)
  • She added: "I would say to other women with breast cancer to take fertility treatment if it's offered - it's scary because you don't know what's going to happen to you but [it] offers you a wee bit piece of mind. (scotsman.com)
  • While many women undergoing fertility treatment feel that twins is desirable and cost effective as they can complete their family in one go, they don't realize all the risks to families, mother and baby associated with a multiples pregnancy," explains Yuzpe. (prweb.com)
  • Around 20 per cent of women going through Chemo Stage 4 will never be able to have children after treatment. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • In Britain, ART accounts for 1.4 per cent of all births every year 10,242 in 2004 while many more women undergo treatment unsuccessfully (the success rate among women under 35 is 28.2 per cent, falling to 10.6 per cent for those aged 40-42). (bio-medicine.org)
  • I'd suffered a clot caused by the fertility treatment I had undergone. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The research, published in the journal Human Reproduction, showed that imposing a single embryo limit on all women undergoing fertility treatment - irrespective of their age or embryo quality - would halve the pregnancy rate per cycle of IVF. (ivf.net)
  • According to new figures presented at the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology, Instead of preserving life, Germany's embryo protection law has had the unintended consequence of increasing the number of foetuses killed after fertility treatment. (medindia.net)
  • However, since they must be derived from early human embryos their production and use in research has been a hotly debated topic as the emt introduce new cells into adult bodies for possible treatment of cancer, diabetes, neurological disorders and other medical conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • women
  • We urgently need all healthcare professionals to talk to women about their fertility options at the point of diagnosis. (scotsman.com)
  • At Genesis we have achieved a 65%-per-cent pregnancy rate for women under 35, and we. (prweb.com)
  • This is an important study as it makes the case for why we need to encourage women under 35 who have good quality embryos to have just one embryo transferred. (prweb.com)
  • At Genesis we have achieved a 65%-per-cent pregnancy rate for women under 35, and we are confident that we can provide women with an excellent chance of getting pregnant without the higher risk of miscarriage or health problems associated with multiple pregnancy," says Dr. Yuzpe, who sits on the Healthy Singleton Births committee of Assisted Human Reproduction Canada. (prweb.com)
  • The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada (SOGC) and the Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS) have recently released guidelines recommending e-SET for women under 35 who are considered to have a good prognosis to conceive. (prweb.com)
  • Rules governing IVF mean that women under 40 in Britain can have two embryos implanted, while those over 40 are allowed three. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Analysis of the series of MESA and TESA revealed an ongoing pregnancy rate of 59 per cent in women under 30, but of only 5 per cent in women over 39. (infertile.com)
  • Women over 35 must have the opportunity to have 2 and women over 40 should still have the chance of having 3 embryos transferred. (ivf.net)
  • human
  • The Bill paves the way for the creation of embryos composed of 99.9 per cent human, 0.1 per cent animal DNA. (theregister.co.uk)
  • It prohibits "true" human-animal hybrids, but allows for so-called chimeras and cytoplasmic hybrid embryos. (theregister.co.uk)
  • Others are concerned about the moral implications of research on any embryos at all: that the proposed research subjects are part animal, part human just compounds an already untenable position. (theregister.co.uk)
  • President Martin Rees is quoted as saying: "It is heartening that the wider public agree with the scientific community that human-animal embryos offer the potential to better understand incurable illnesses such as Parkinson's and Motor Neurone Disease. (theregister.co.uk)
  • These developments prompted the federal government to create regulations barring the use of federal funds for research that experimented on human embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the 1980s, human IVF embryos were exclusively transferred on day two of development as the culture medium used was incapable of reliably growing embryos past this stage. (wikipedia.org)
  • cycles
  • At the time, over 90 per cent of IVF cycles in the UK involved the transfer of two or three embryos. (ivf.net)
  • In Rome, Fishel and his team reported the first birth from SUZI in 1990, which was televised by Italian television station Rai Uno, and described a clinical pregnancy rate of 15 per cent from 225 SUZI cycles a year later. (wikipedia.org)
  • genetic
  • The standard response here is that Mengele used the already born, whereas today's genetic adventurers are using "embryos. (thenewamerican.com)
  • The term preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) is used to denote procedures that do not look for a specific disease but use PGD techniques to identify embryos at risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transfer
  • The transfer of two to three embryos was possible in almost all patients. (infertile.com)
  • Since the biopsy was to be performed on day three, the first diagnoses were all performed in one day, with transfer of the embryos late on day three. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • You can take six weeks out and create embryos but I simply don't have time and there is no guarantee that would work either. (huffingtonpost.co.uk)
  • A careful reading of the 1983 clinical report often cited as the first instance of embryo donation reveals that the donated embryo was actually created for the recipient at the same time that four embryos were made for the donor couple's own use. (wikipedia.org)
  • rate
  • In 2005, the live birth rate statistics improved to approximately 21.6 per cent, resulting in 11,262 children through IVF but still involving the creation of around 191,000 embryos. (ivf.net)
  • Lord Alton expressed surprise at the 'incredible rate' of unwanted embryos created in order to achieve successful pregnancies. (ivf.net)
  • Today, the twin birth rate is 23.6 per cent for IVF mothers, compared with between one per cent and two per cent in the general population. (bio-medicine.org)
  • However, in 2004 this rate of increase had slowed to just two per cent. (medindia.net)
  • potentially
  • If scientists knew which genes were crucial for healthy cell division, then they could screen out embryos where their DNA was not working properly, potentially preventing miscarriages and aiding fertility. (thenewamerican.com)
  • procedure
  • Specialists create multiple embryos to increase the efficacy of IVF, an invasive, emotionally-taxing and expensive procedure. (ivf.net)
  • Others use the terms synonymously because regardless of whether the arrangement is open or anonymous, the donation of embryos and a clinical assisted reproduction procedure is involved, and the recipient couple is preparing to raise a child not genetically related to them. (wikipedia.org)
  • good
  • Donating embryos for research may be a good alternative when patients receive proper, honest and clear information about the research project, the procedures and the scientific value of the research. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientists
  • The measure aims to reduce risky multiple-birth pregnancies and thereby encourage scientists to discover IVF methods that require fewer embryos. (ivf.net)
  • twins
  • Currently around 40 per cent of IVF babies are twins, and therefore three times more likely than single babies to be stillborn. (ivf.net)
  • year
  • After much discussion Nicole and her fiancĂ© Dave decided to have embryos frozen in February 2013, a year before they were due to get married. (scotsman.com)
  • The following year, when the new reimbursement rules were implemented, total activity dropped by nearly 50 per cent to 60,425. (medindia.net)
  • It costs up to $1,200 a year to store frozen embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • million
  • With relatively small provision of IVF on the NHS, the fertility business has developed into a multi-million-pound industry charging up to 5,000 for a single cycle. (bio-medicine.org)
  • transfers
  • The number of frozen embryo transfers has continued to increase, rising from around 18 per cent when the consortium first started collecting data to 26 per cent in 2004. (medindia.net)
  • The worry of embryos arresting was so high that some transfers took place in the early hours of day four so that the embryos were removed from culture as soon as possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • Over the past 14 years, over half of the total number of embryos created for use in IVF in the UK have not been used, according to government statistics. (ivf.net)
  • It aims to reduce the number of multiple births to ten per cent over three years. (ivf.net)
  • babies
  • The aforementioned controversy surrounds the idea, as the paper also reported, "that allowing embryos to be edited opens the door to designer babies and genetically modified humans. (thenewamerican.com)
  • days
  • Any hybrid embryos would be allowed to divide for 14 days before being destroyed, and would not be allowed to be implanted into a womb. (theregister.co.uk)
  • often
  • Most often, the embryos are donated after the woman for whom they were originally created has successfully carried one or more pregnancies to term. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • The charity said this is leading to an estimated 5,000 younger breast cancer patients across the UK missing out on fertility care. (scotsman.com)
  • He reports that "Twenty-five per cent of patients want to donate their [spare] embryos - not as many as I'd like. (wikipedia.org)