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  • Supplier
  • HPMC, Construction Additive, Tile Glue Admixture manufacturer / supplier in China, offering HPMC Hydroxypropyl Methyl Cellulose Tile Glue Admixture Mhpc, Rd Powder for Hardend Mortar Surface Providing Excellent Abrasion Resistance, Interior Flooring Leveling Mortar HPMC 400 Mhpc and so on. (made-in-china.com)
  • plant
  • Trichoderma longibrachiatum uses cellulases to digest cellulose from decaying plant biomass, and chitinases to digest the chitinous walls of other fungi. (wikipedia.org)
  • lignin
  • The percentage of each component varies for each different type of fiber, however, generally, are present around 60-80% cellulose, 5-20% lignin, and until 20% of moisture, besides hemicellulose and a small percent of residual chemical components. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemistry
  • This includes the chemistry, biochemistry, physics and materials science of cellulose and its sources, including wood and other biomass resources, and their derivatives. (springer.com)
  • hydrolysis
  • Direct bioconversion of cellulose to ethanol is a process in which the same microorganism carries out both hydrolysis and fermentation of cellulose to ethanol in one operation. (rroij.com)
  • Simultaneous hydrolysis of cellulose to ethanol improves the kinetics and economics of biomass conversion by minimizing accumulation of hydrolysis products that are inhibitory. (rroij.com)
  • cellulosic
  • Conversion of cellulose from energy crops into biofuels such as cellulosic ethanol is under investigation as an alternative fuel source. (wikipedia.org)
  • polysaccharide
  • Cellulose is an organic compound with the formula (C 6H 10O 5) n, a polysaccharide consisting of a linear chain of several hundred to many thousands of β(1→4) linked D-glucose units. (wikipedia.org)
  • Viscose
  • This process, patented by the founders of the Viscose Development Company, is the most widely used method for manufacturing regenerated cellulose products. (wikipedia.org)
  • hydrophilic
  • In human nutrition, cellulose is a non-digestible constituent of insoluble dietary fiber, acting as a hydrophilic bulking agent for feces and potentially aiding in defecation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellulose has no taste, is odorless, is hydrophilic with the contact angle of 20-30 degrees, is insoluble in water and most organic solvents, is chiral and is biodegradable. (wikipedia.org)
  • membranes
  • While the first application of regenerated cellulose was as a clothing textile, this class of materials is also used in the production of disposable medical devices as well as fabrication of artificial membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • sodium
  • Aqualon™ cellulose gum, or sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), is widely used as an economical thickener and stabilizer in foods and beverages. (ashland.com)
  • Aquasorb™ cellulose gum, or sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), is a high-purity, powdered super-absorbent that offers increased bake stability, extended shelf life, freeze/thaw stability and water binding. (ashland.com)
  • Sodium cellulose phosphate is a drug used to treat hypercalcemia and hypercalciuria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Working off of this effect, sodium cellulose phosphate will bind with divalent intestinal cations. (wikipedia.org)
  • By a study done at the University of Texas, it was found that sodium cellulose phosphate inhibited calcium absorption through three separate techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sodium cellulose phosphate reduces the renal excretion of magnesium and calcium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The major US dosage form of sodium cellulose phosphate is Calcibind, which was developed and brought to market by Mission Pharma. (wikipedia.org)
  • insoluble
  • Cellulose, dextran, agarose and other insoluble complexes are unaffected because they compose inert matrices, hence why they are so often derivatized with strong and weak cation and anion exchangers in chromatography. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecules
  • The OH groups form strong hydrogen bonds between cellulose molecules, with the result that cellulose structures cannot be loosened by heat or solvents without causing chemical decomposition. (britannica.com)
  • The difference between cellulose and other complex carbohydrate molecules is how the glucose molecules are linked together. (wikipedia.org)
  • microbiology
  • S. Williams and R. Cannon, "Alternative Environmental Roles for Cellulose Produced by Acetobacter xylinum," Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 55, pp. 2448-2452, Oct. 1989. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1838
  • Cellulose was discovered in 1838 by the French chemist Anselme Payen, who isolated it from plant matter and determined its chemical formula. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a material, cellulose was first discovered in 1838 by Anselme Payen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sarcina
  • Other researchers reported the formation of cellulose by other various organisms such as the Acetobacter pasteurianum, Acetobacter rancens, Sarcina ventriculi, and Bacterium xylinoides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bacteria that produce cellulose include Gram-negative bacteria species such as Acetobacter, Azotobacter, Rhizobium, Pseudomonas, Salmonella, Alcaligenes, and Gram-positive bacteria species such as Sarcina ventriculi. (wikipedia.org)
  • fermentation
  • The filamentous fungus FusariumOxysporum is known for its stability to produce ethanol by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of cellulose. (rroij.com)
  • substrate
  • Such an interaction called mutualism may help increase the yield of the product.The results are presented for the systematic analysis of the influence of various parameters that control substrate utilization, microbial growth and product formation.The models developed for the bioconversion of cellulose. (rroij.com)