• pathogens
  • The most common pathogens in bighorn sheep are respiratory bacteria Pasteurella haemolytica or Pasteurella multocida, and Mycoplasma ovipneumonia but respiratory viruses like Infectious Bovine Rhinovirus, Parainfluenza virus, Bovine Respiratory Syncytial Virus, or parasites like lungworms can contribute to pneumonia in bighorns and other ruminants. (idaho.gov)
  • anaerobic
  • Clostridium botulinum Clostridium perfringens Bacillus cereus The rare but potentially deadly disease botulism occurs when the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium botulinum grows in improperly canned low-acid foods and produces botulin, a powerful paralytic toxin. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacterial
  • The genus Corynebacterium was created by Lehmann and Neumann in 1896 as a taxonomic group to contain the bacterial rods responsible for causing diphtheria. (wikipedia.org)
  • Furthermore, we modeled the PhoP of C. pseudotuberculosis and our docking results showed that several natural compounds including Rhein, an anthraquinone from Rheum undulatum, and some drug-like molecules may target PhoP to inhibit the TCS of C. pseudotuberculosis, and therefore may facilitate a remarkable attenuation of bacterial pathogenicity being the CLA. (jove.com)
  • Toxins from bacterial infections are delayed because the bacteria need time to multiply. (wikipedia.org)
  • Staphylococcus aureus Staphylococcal enteritis Streptococcus Vibrio cholerae, including O1 and non-O1 Vibrio parahaemolyticus Vibrio vulnificus Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Less common bacterial agents: Brucella spp. (wikipedia.org)
  • mucous membranes
  • The bacteria lives in soil and usually enters the horse's body through wounds, broken skin or through mucous membranes. (equimed.com)
  • Horses contract the disease through an open wound or fly bite, with bacteria entering through these abrasions or wounds and, sometimes, mucous membranes. (oregonvma.org)
  • Humans
  • Humans can also carry the bacteria on their boots, hands, and tools. (oregonvma.org)
  • It can cause bronchopneumonia in immunodeficient humans, especially those with AIDS. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It occurs mainly in cooked and processed foods due to competition with other biota in raw foods, and humans are the main cause of contamination as a substantial percentage of humans are persistent carriers of S. aureus. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also capable to cause diseases in cattle and humans. (biomedcentral.com)
  • abscess
  • In most cases, the immune system functions properly to destroy the bacteria and infected or inflamed tissue, and the abscess is either resorbed or breaks through the skin to the outside. (dawog.net)
  • In order to select an appropriate treatment or offer a prognosis, the cause of the abscess should be determined by bacteriologic culture. (dawog.net)
  • Ideally, an abscess should only be lanced after it has matured well and has an obvious soft spot, or the procedure should be guided with ultrasound to find the best site for drainage that avoids important structures. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • This causes intense vomiting including or not including diarrhea (resulting in staphylococcal enteritis), and staphylococcal enterotoxins (most commonly staphylococcal enterotoxin A but also including staphylococcal enterotoxin B) are the most commonly reported enterotoxins although cases of poisoning are likely underestimated. (wikipedia.org)
  • horses
  • Horses should be examined daily for wounds or abrasions that could become portals of entry for bacteria. (equimed.com)
  • In 2008, an Oregon veterinarian who was treating horses with pigeon fever contracted the bacteria. (oregonvma.org)
  • goat
  • CLA is prevalent worldwide and causes considerable economic losses to the sheep and goat industries. (uzh.ch)
  • Furthermore
  • Furthermore, foodborne illness can be caused by pesticides or medicines in food and natural toxic substances such as poisonous mushrooms or reef fish. (wikipedia.org)
  • lungs
  • The cysts are usually found in the lungs but can also occur in the liver or other organs. (idaho.gov)
  • deer
  • Carotid Artery Worm is caused by a parasitic nematode (Elaeophora schneideri) found in white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. (idaho.gov)
  • Carotid artery worms are native parasites of mule deer, but have been found in white-tailed deer, mule deer, elk and moose. (idaho.gov)
  • Giant liver flukes are found in mule deer, white-tailed deer, elk, and moose in many parts of North America. (idaho.gov)
  • incubation period
  • The incubation period ranges from hours to days, depending on the cause and on how much was consumed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The incubation period tends to cause sufferers to not associate the symptoms with the item consumed, and so to cause sufferers to attribute the symptoms to gastroenteritis for example. (wikipedia.org)
  • liver
  • In animals that are not definitive hosts for giant liver flukes, the flukes can cause significant liver damage and ill thrift or death in severely affected individuals. (idaho.gov)
  • potentially
  • An overly tight bandage should not be applied, as swelling may continue, decreasing circulation through the limb, and potentially causing a bandage-bow. (wikipedia.org)
  • North America
  • The current distribution of CWD in North America can be found in various links provided here. (idaho.gov)
  • Hydatid disease is found around the world including North America where it exists in two forms - a domestic form involving domestic dogs and domestic sheep and a sylvatic form involving wolves or coyotes and ungulates. (idaho.gov)
  • Pneumonia in bighorn sheep has been found throughout North America. (idaho.gov)
  • cysts
  • In definitive hosts, flukes are found in yellowish-white fibrous cysts that 1-2 inches across that contain pairs of flukes. (idaho.gov)
  • A reddish brown liquid is found inside the cysts with the flukes. (idaho.gov)