• inner ear
  • This happens when the brain receives conflicting signals from the eyes, which are trying to focus on constantly moving scenery, and the inner ear, which monitors the direction of any motion. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Balance problems (vertigo) are often caused by a conflict between what is seen and how the inner ear perceives it, leading to confusion in the brain. (healthofchildren.com)
  • The chamber of the inner ear known as the vestibular labyrinth (ves-TIB-u-lar LAB-e-rinth) consists of fluid-filled, interconnected tubes called semicircular canals that monitor the direction of motion. (humanillnesses.com)
  • Conflicting signals from motion-sensing organs of the body, including the inner ear and eyes, are typically generated by movement such as riding in a car, airplane, or on a boat. (drweil.com)
  • When feeling motion but not seeing it (for example, in a ship with no windows), the inner ear transmits to the brain that it senses motion, but the eyes tell the brain that everything is still. (wikipedia.org)
  • The inner ear is particularly important in the maintenance of balance and equilibrium because it contains sensors for both angular (rotational) and linear motion. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are sometimes also used to treat motion sickness or vertigo caused by problems with the inner ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • Any cause of inflammation such as common cold, influenza, and bacterial infections may cause transient vertigo if it involves the inner ear, as may chemical insults (e.g., aminoglycosides) or physical trauma (e.g., skull fractures). (wikipedia.org)
  • Extrapyramidal
  • Toxicology also manifests in the autonomic nervous system, primarily at the neuromuscular junction, resulting in ataxia and extrapyramidal side-effects and the feeling of heaviness in the legs, and at sympathetic post-ganglionic junctions, causing urinary retention, pupil dilation, tachycardia, irregular urination, and dry red skin caused by decreased exocrine gland secretions, and mucous membranes. (wikipedia.org)
  • alcohol
  • Whether the cause is seasickness or the flu, pregnancy or food poisoning, too much alcohol or a drug reaction, eventually we all feel the sweaty waves of nausea, a sour signal that we may be about to lose our lunch. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Too much rich food or alcohol can also cause queasiness and vomiting. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Other causes may include toxin exposures such as to carbon monoxide, alcohol, or aspirin. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • EVAs are consequently not usually scheduled for the first days of a mission to allow the crew to adapt, and transdermal dimenhydrinate patches are typically used as an additional backup measure. (wikipedia.org)
  • travelers
  • Often viewed as a minor annoyance, some travelers are temporarily immobilized by motion sickness, and a few continue to feel its effects for hours and even days after a trip. (healthofchildren.com)
  • Travelers should sit wherever there is the least motion. (humanillnesses.com)
  • Space adaptation syndrome (SAS) or space sickness is a condition experienced by around half of space travelers during adaptation to weightlessness. (wikipedia.org)
  • pregnancy
  • Elevated hormone levels during pregnancy--particularly in the first trimester--cause nausea for many women. (wholehealthmd.com)
  • Nausea or "morning sickness" is common during early pregnancy but may occasionally continue into the second and third trimesters. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pregnancy should therefore be considered as a possible cause of nausea in any women of child bearing age. (wikipedia.org)
  • also a 5-HT3 receptor antagonists NK1 receptor antagonist Aprepitant (Emend) is a commercially available NK1 Receptor antagonist Casopitant is an investigational NK1 receptor antagonist Rolapitant (Varubi) another recently approved drug from this class Antihistamines (H1 histamine receptor antagonists) are effective in many conditions, including motion sickness, morning sickness in pregnancy, and to combat opioid nausea. (wikipedia.org)
  • antiemetics
  • Antiemetics, though previously thought to cause birth defects, have been proven safe for use by pregnant women in the treatment of morning sickness and the more serious hyperemesis gravidarum. (wikipedia.org)
  • onset of nausea
  • Commonly, the first symptom of motion sickness is a feeling of uneasiness, leading to the onset of nausea (a queasy, wave-like feeling in the stomach and head). (drweil.com)
  • Food poisoning usually causes an abrupt onset of nausea and vomiting one to six hours after ingestion of contaminated food and lasts for one to two days. (wikipedia.org)
  • injection
  • In adults, 50 mg to 100 mg of dimenhydrinate may be given as a suppository or injection, 30 to 60 minutes before receiving radiation therapy. (canada.com)
  • However, they can also cause constipation or diarrhea, dry mouth, and fatigue.Dolasetron (Anzemet) can be administered in tablet form or in an injection. (wikipedia.org)
  • infections
  • Amoxicillin is a synthetic penicillin-type antibiotic effective against a range of infections caused by gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. (vcahospitals.com)
  • people
  • Research also suggests that some people inherit a predisposition to motion sickness. (healthofchildren.com)
  • People who have COPD or diseases that can cause low oxygen levels may need in-flight oxygen supplementation even if they don't use oxygen at home. (tampabay.com)
  • Other people get seasick from the rocking motion of a boat on rough water. (humanillnesses.com)
  • There is considerable variation in the tendency to become motion sick - some people are incapacitated by it, others seem completely immune to it (pilots term these lucky individuals "lead heads. (drweil.com)
  • All three are also notorious for causing gastric upset in some people. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Most people can expect some relief of nausea and vomiting within one hour of taking any form of dimenhydrinate. (canada.com)
  • There is some evidence that people with Asian ancestry get motion sickness more frequently compared with people of European ancestry, and there are situational and behavioral factors, such as whether a passenger has a view of the road ahead, and diet and eating behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Other CNS effects occur within the limbic system and hippocampus, causing confusion and temporary amnesia due to decreased acetylcholine signaling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Second is the operation of Sherrington's Law describing reciprocal inhibition between agonist-antagonist muscle pairs, and by implication the stretching of extraocular muscle that must occur whenever Sherrington's Law is made to fail, thereby causing an unrelaxed (contracted) muscle to be stretched. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physiologic vertigo may occur following being exposed to motion for a prolonged period such as when on a ship or simply following spinning with the eyes closed. (wikipedia.org)
  • receptors
  • For example, when reading a book in the back seat of a moving car, the inner ears and skin receptors sense the motion, but the eyes register only the stationary pages of the book. (healthofchildren.com)