• Sudden Cardi
  • Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) and sudden cardiac death (SCD) occur when the heart abruptly begins to beat in an abnormal or irregular rhythm (arrhythmia). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cases have shown that the most common finding at postmortem examination of sudden cardiac death (SCD) is chronic high-grade stenosis of at least one segment of a major coronary artery, the arteries that supply the heart muscle with its blood supply. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Another school of thought focuses on hypothermia's ability to prevent the injuries that occur after circulation returns to the brain, or what is termed reperfusion injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • occurs
  • There is a theory that unconsciousness occurs when different regions of the brain inhibit one another. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, cardiac arrest outside hospital occurs in about 13 per 10,000 people per year (326,000 cases). (wikipedia.org)
  • In hospital cardiac arrest occurs in an additional 209,000. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the arrest occurs, the most obvious sign of its occurrence will be the lack of a palpable pulse in the person experiencing it (since the heart has ceased to contract, the usual indications of its contraction such as a pulse will no longer be detectable). (wikipedia.org)
  • Four types of cerebral edema have been identified: Vasogenic edema occurs due to a breakdown of the tight endothelial junctions that make up the blood-brain barrier. (wikipedia.org)
  • focal
  • In a minority there may be seizures, papilledema, sixth nerve palsy, or other focal deficits corresponding to focal venous infarction or hemorrahage. (thecardiologyadvisor.com)
  • Thrombotic and embolic are generally focal or multifocal in nature while hypoperfusion affects the brain globally. (wikipedia.org)
  • cerebral edema
  • Cerebral edema is excess accumulation of fluid in the intracellular or extracellular spaces of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain changes in morphology are associated with cerebral edema: the brain becomes soft and smooth and overfills the cranial vault, gyri (ridges) become flattened, sulci (grooves) become narrowed, and ventricular cavities become compressed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cerebral edema from brain cancer Cancerous glial cells (glioma) of the brain can increase secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which weakens the junctions of the blood-brain barrier. (wikipedia.org)
  • pediatric
  • Some facilities also have specialized pediatric cardiac intensive care units, where patients with congenital heart disease are cared for. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pediatric cardiology - Heart - Chordae tendinae - Right atrium - Right ventricle - Tricuspid valve - Left atrium - Left ventricle - Mitral valve - Endocardium - Myocardium - Pericardial cavity - Transverse pericardial sinus - Pericardium - The cardiac physical exam focuses on portions of the physical exam that elucidate information about diseases and disorders outlined below. (wikipedia.org)
  • oxygen
  • It has been found to offer some protection to the brain when brain cells are deprived of their normal oxygen supply causing cells to die or be impaired. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The kidney receives 20% of the cardiac output and utilizes 10% of body oxygen consumption to accomplish its primary function, regulating the body fluid composition through filtering and reabsorbing materials. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • when the brain is completely deprived of oxygen, it is called cerebral anoxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The brain requires approximately 3.3 ml of oxygen per 100 g of brain tissue per minute. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially the body responds to lowered blood oxygen by redirecting blood to the brain and increasing cerebral blood flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • the oxygen level in the brain tissue will depend on how the body deals with the reduced oxygen content of the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • trauma
  • Mechanisms contributing to blood-brain barrier dysfunction include physical disruption by arterial hypertension or trauma, and tumor-facilitated release of vasoactive and endothelial destructive compounds (e.g. arachidonic acid, excitatory neurotransmitters, eicosanoids, bradykinin, histamine, and free radicals). (wikipedia.org)
  • aortic
  • A study of aortic cross-clamping, a common procedure in cardiac surgery, demonstrated a strong potential benefit with further research ongoing. (wikipedia.org)
  • outcomes
  • Targeted temperature management (TTM) previously known as therapeutic hypothermia or protective hypothermia is an active treatment that tries to achieve and maintain a specific body temperature in a person for a specific duration of time in an effort to improve health outcomes during recovery after a period of stopped blood flow to the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • hypothermia
  • Is Therapeutic Hypothermia Beneficial in All Patients Following Cardiac Arrest? (liebertpub.com)
  • This procedure is called therapeutic hypothermia, and it has been shown by a number of large, high-quality randomised trials to significantly improve survival and reduce brain damage after birth asphyxia in newborn infants, almost doubling the chance of normal survival. (wikipedia.org)
  • survival
  • Despite early support for endotracheal tube insertion, the American Heart Association acknowledges the lack of conclusive evidence demonstrating improved survival resulting from advanced airway insertion for adult victims of cardiac arrest. (boundtreeuniversity.com)
  • In an evaluation of over 3,300 patients who suffered an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, researchers in Japan could not demonstrate statistically significant differences in neurologically intact survival rates between patients managed with an endotracheal tube or an SGA. (boundtreeuniversity.com)
  • These recommendations were largely based on two trials from 2002 which showed improved survival and brain function when cooled to 32-34 °C (90-93 °F) after cardiac arrest. (wikipedia.org)
  • characteristic
  • Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a heart-shaped region of diffusion abnormality, characteristic of BMP infarction. (springermedizin.de)
  • Changes on diffusion-weighted MRI of the brain showed the characteristic heart-shaped BMP infarction, indicating occlusion of a unilateral ASA. (springermedizin.de)
  • It is this swelling of the individual cells of the brain that is seen as the main distinguishing characteristic of cytotoxic edema, as opposed to vasogenic edema, wherein the influx of fluid is typically seen in the interstitial space rather than within the cells themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • Cardiology can be described as all of the following: An academic discipline Branch of science Branch of applied science Branch of medicine Branch of internal medicine Adult cardiology - Cardiac electrophysiology - study of the electrical properties and conduction diseases of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • First, the head-impact causes immediate damage to the brain. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • An interruption of blood flow to the brain for more than 10 seconds causes unconsciousness, and an interruption in flow for more than a few minutes generally results in irreversible brain damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, if a significant amount of time passes before restoration, brain damage may be permanent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Damage to the left hemisphere of the brain has been explicitly implicated in the associative form of visual agnosia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Goldberg suggested that the associative visual form of agnosia results from damage to the ventral stream of the brain, the occipito-temporal stream, which plays a key role in object recognition as the so-called "what" region of the brain, as opposed to the "where," dorsal stream. (wikipedia.org)
  • herniation
  • Isolated dilation of a pupil and loss of the pupillary light reflex may reflect brain herniation as a result of rising intracranial pressure (pressure inside the skull). (wikipedia.org)
  • airway
  • A link between what we now know as the sympathetic system and the lung was shown in 1887 when Grossman showed that stimulation of cardiac accelerator nerves reversed muscarine-induced airway constriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • adequate
  • Without organized electrical activity in the heart muscle, there is no consistent contraction of the ventricles, which results in the heart's inability to generate an adequate cardiac output (forward pumping of blood from heart to rest of the body). (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetics
  • Regardless of genetics, mental health or traumatic experiences, social factors play a large role in exposure to and availability of certain types of drugs and patterns of drug use. (wikipedia.org)
  • cognitive
  • The etiology of the cognitive impairment, as well the areas of the brain affected by lesions and stage of recovery are the primary determinants of the pattern of deficit. (wikipedia.org)